5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Anything related to legal issues, immigration, problems, regulations, tax issues, or any other law or legal related problem in Chile. Moderated By A Chilean Attorney.

Moderator: Zvalenzuela

Will you vote in Chile?

Yes
16
70%
No
2
9%
Maybe
2
9%
Had No clue I could
3
13%
 
Total votes: 23

tomtomuk
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby tomtomuk » Wed Jun 27, 2012 1:23 am



Anyone who believes that someone who decides not to vote is not entitled to have an opinion is very stupid. It is a ridiculous notion and unfortunately it is one of those cliched phrases that get used all too often.

There are many considered and intelligent reasons why someone may choose not to vote.

griffin
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby griffin » Wed Jun 27, 2012 10:41 am

admin wrote:You have not had residency for 5 years?


Of course we have, it's just weird diplomatic frequently renewed temp residency. We are among the blue-plate license folk, we have a whole different subset of rules that apply just to us, all handled by the foreign ministry. (Lucky us...) :roll:

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admin
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby admin » Wed Jun 27, 2012 11:11 am

sorry, forgot about that. It is obviously the colour of your license plate that is keeping you down and disenfranchised. A can of spray paint will fix that.
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griffin
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby griffin » Wed Jun 27, 2012 1:06 pm

admin wrote:It is obviously the colour of your license plate that is keeping you down and disenfranchised.


No blue plate voters! We could have our own micro-demonstration. Banging on blue license plates instead of pots. Or throw them on a pile of burning tires. :lol:

jehturner
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby jehturner » Wed Jun 27, 2012 11:28 pm

You see, that's why astronomers are prohibited from engaging in Chilean politics. Imagine the carnage...

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zer0nz
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby zer0nz » Wed Jun 27, 2012 11:33 pm

jehturner wrote:You see, that's why astronomers are prohibited from engaging in Chilean politics. Imagine the carnage...



another blue plater? i would have to say, i saw more blue plats in la serena than anywhere else...

except hash house harriers. im sure that is there free ticket to drive after drinking :)

jehturner
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby jehturner » Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:01 am

'Fraid so. Actually I had white plates until I finally bought a new truck and the permiso was going to cost 200k...

Hmmm... it's hassle for the pacos but everyone is pretty cautious about the drinking thing nowadays. It would be pretty ironic if they got us for that after years of behaving responsibly when you could pretty much get away with anything (plus or minus a limited fine).

Your drinking & running club brings back college days...

Donnybrook
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby Donnybrook » Fri Jun 29, 2012 10:22 pm

We went over to the Municipalidad de Vitacura (simply because they have covered parking and it was raining) and changed our ancient Viña address which was on the Servel website. We will get a letter to say where we can vote. You just tell them which comuna you want to vote in. They fill in a form for you and you just sign. You don't have to take anything to prove where you live, you can choose anywhere you want to vote, but you will have to vote in the comuna you stipulate. They send you the name of the voting center by post.

Donnybrook
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby Donnybrook » Fri Aug 03, 2012 12:41 pm

We got our letters today telling us at which mesa we will vote. We both have the same table, which is 'nueva', so it seems that at least some tables will be mixed gender, perhaps just newly registered voters.

JFT
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby JFT » Thu Jun 20, 2013 7:06 pm

I know this topic is a bit old, but with the election coming up...

When I went to the registro civil recently to renew my carnet after getting PD they asked if I wanted to register to vote. I told them that I thought I needed to wait 5 years but the guy said no and went through with the sign up process. Maybe the changed the 5 year rule recently? Or he was just misinformed?

IndDes
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby IndDes » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:07 pm

admin wrote:In Chile, if you have seen a presidential election, your vote will not only be counted but often on national TV in front of a bunch of cameras, or at least witnessed by all the people gathered at the public polling places around the country (presidential elections are like a national party). The "volunteers" that run the stations, are drafted right out of line as help at a table is needed. No hanging chad or George bushes, no secret backroom voting counts, mysterious election reviews by mysterious groups, or nullifications of the individual vote counts with mysterious "electoral college" crap, or simply dumped in the garbage as the supreme court thinks might best fit them.


Your comment spurs two thoughts in my mind.

First of all, are you saying that everyone sees who you vote for when you vote in Chile? If so, I find that frightening. The reason for secret voting is not so that the votes can be manipulated behind closed doors (which certainly could happen), but so that a person does not feel pressured to vote a certain way out of fear of retribution. Time and time again history has shown that when less-than-scrupulous leaders come into power, it's not unheard of them rounding up and imprisoning or executing those who did not support them. And let's not forget, politics is a business where psychopaths line up with delight.

Heck, even talking politics with neighbors or one's own family can often cause an unmendable situation. So, let's not even think of the unspeakable things a stranger might do to someone whose opinions they don't care for or flatly despise.

Now as far as the Electoral College, it is not what it was originally designed to be. In its original form and meaning, it makes a lot of sense. The first important fact to realize is that the President of the United States did not represent the people, but instead represented the individual states (which technically, were individual countries). Each state's government would chose two people who would vote for the Presidential candidate that would best fulfill its interests. So, if your state was agricultural, it would pick two electors who would vote for a pro-agricultrual President. If your state was industrialized, they would want two electors who would pick a pro-industrial President. And so on and so forth.

Because the President was not democratically elected, the founding fathers did add a popular vote as a tell-tale, to make sure the states were not completely out of line with the interests of their citizens. But, in reality, because the President did not represent the interests of individual citizens, their votes were really nothing more than a public opinion poll.

Unfortunately, over the years the electoral college has been altered quite a bit, so that the number of electors is now based on the population of a state rather than each state having an equal number of two. What that means is that, whereas before each state had equal say no matter what their size, now a Presidential candidate need only win certain highly-populated states to become President. Thus, candidates don't even bother to go to some states any more when campaigning because it doesn't suit their purpose. And, as a result, only the citizens of certain states are represented by the President (i.e. has his ear).

The other big change is that the electors are now picked by the candidates, and that their are several sets of electors, one for each candidate. When Americans go to vote now, they, rather than state officials, elect the electors, who in turn vote for the Presidential candidate who chose them.

The same democratization happened with the US Senate. Originally, Senators were chosen by the state governments, not the people. So, if 150 years ago you contacted your Congressional Senator about a problem, he would tell you that he doesn't work for you, but rather for your state, and that you need to contact your democratically-elected representative in the House of Representatives. The two sides of Congress, one being democratic (for the people), and the other representing a state's interests, were supposed to provide a balance in government. Now both sides are elected by the people, leaving a state's interest out of the process.

Donnybrook
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Re: 5+ year residents, will you vote in Chile?

Postby Donnybrook » Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:59 pm

First of all, are you saying that everyone sees who you vote for when you vote in Chile?


No, the votes are anonymous. Once the voting station closes, the votes are taken out and counted publicly. Political parties can have a witness at each table if they want and some people stick around to watch the votes being counted just out of interest. Once they are counted, the totals are filled in on a form and they go off to be counted all over again by the Servicio Electoral. But no one knows who each voter chose.


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