rural wifi options?

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hugeh2o
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rural wifi options?

Post by hugeh2o » Fri Aug 26, 2011 4:56 pm

I own a small hostel outside of Pucon and would like to setup wifi this season. Cable internet does not extend to my location on the Trancura River approximately 10 KM from Pucon.

With a moviestar laptop plugin modem I can get reception and Internet. But it's preferred to have wifi for all guests. What are my options?

Thank you for any suggestions.

David

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by admin » Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:45 pm

There are companies in the 9th region that do "microwave". In our experience, with our clients that have contracted it, it was pretty unreliable because of the lack of technical skills of the people running it. Other option our clients around the lake there have tried is satilite. But sat is sat. In chile they will tell you all about the great speeds, but they still can not get the laws of physics to move any faster.

If you are 10 k from Pucon, you might look in to long distance wireless relay (essentially regular wireless, focused to push a signal over a long distance). The hardware has come down in price. If you are not a do it yourself computer hacker, you will likely want to track down someone that understands what they are doing. If you get lucky, geographically, it can be done with one relay point on a hill or line of site to downtown pucon if you are really lucky.

Telsur, in certain locations, offers microwave service also. Not sure if they cover pucon. Frutillar has it, but only handful of people can afford it. Expect microwave to run about 100,000-200,000 pesos a month.
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rust
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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by rust » Fri Aug 26, 2011 11:07 pm

hugeh2o wrote:With a moviestar laptop plugin modem I can get reception and Internet. But it's preferred to have wifi for all guests. What are my options?
First of all, stay away from a MICROLAB router, they are CRAP. You can get a nice DLINK router CHEAP.

Second... ouch! You don't have a Huwaei POC Wireless Internet GPRS router? These are now available through ENTEL. Similar to one of those stupid Pendrive-style modems in how they work, they look like a regular router except that they have the GPRS transceiver built in.

OK, so they aren't available for you, OR they want a TON of money to rent one per month. Here's how to do it.

1. Purchase a regular WiFi router from your local computer store/multitienda/Superstore whatever. Stay away from the JUNK! Linksys or DLink are your friends. Encore and others are POCs. Here's a link to a CHEAP DLink that looks good. http://www.wei.cl/catalogue/product.htm ... HUDLI00600

2. You are going to connect your PC to the router via the LAN cable. Connect it to one of the LAN ports, not the WAN port. Boot up the router and let it assign an address to your PC. It will probably be something like 192.168.0.11 or similar.

3. Go into the Router, usually as user/password admin/admin. Change that immediately to something ELSE. Investigate what the LAN interface is set to. It is usually something like 192.168.0.1 or similar. If it IS 192.168.0.1 you WILL HAVE TO CHANGE it. Change it to something like 192.168.0.101 -- unless it is set to 192.168.100.1 -- only change it if it's 192.168.0.1 -- have a guru standing by to help if necessary. You will also have to set up the Access Point parameters (SSID, encryption, password and so on). You are going to do something more advanced a little later.

4. Plug in your Wireless Modem. Your modem came with dialling software and all kinds of useless stuff. Let it install its stuff. Now, you will have to set up Connection Sharing on the PC to allow the computer to share the Modem with the WiFi router. Dead-brained windows will probably make your LAN connection default to 192.168.0.1 -- this is why you have to change the WiFi router in the previous step, UNLESS the router uses a DIFFERENT base address, like 192.168.1.100 or similar.

5. Your computer is probably going to need to be rebooted. Start it all up again and connect to the Internet by using the Dialup manager program that came with the modem. Now, if you are lucky, you will have another device handy that has a Wireless adapter built in, like a notebook, or an iPhone, or iPod Touch, or LG with WiFi or whatever. Connect via WiFi to your router and you should be navegating.

6. Secure the entire SHEBANG by enabling MAC filters. And here, MAC does not refer to Apple products, but to the Media Access Control address which is a hexadecimal (numbers and letters ABCDEF) string that UNIQUELY identifies the device. For example, it may be similar to 00-1E-8C-85-03-F8 -- which is an address for a Realtek Ethernet adapter. If you enable MAC filters, you can set your router up for NO PASSWORD and still control the connection through MAC Address filtering. This is good for people who come and go. In order for them to connect to your router, they have to give you their MAC address. When they leave, you remove it from the list of allowed addresses on the router. Of course, you can always have the addresses of your LG phone with WiFi, or iPad or Netbook in the list for convenience.

7. A Guru is indispensable for this whole process. Twenty lucas would be acceptable payment for setting the thing up for you. Maybe a little more if you feel generous. NOTE: there is NO NEED for a WIRELESS card on your PC, and NO NEED for it to be opened up. Your PC should have a LAN adapter built in already.

Note that when VTR finally comes with CABLE MODEMS into your area, you will be able to change over to that system VERY EASILY. Also be advised that your PC absolutely MUST be running AND connected via the Wireless Modem in order for your guests to have access to the Internet.

Another alternative is WiMax. It is slower usually than GPRS and uses different hardware. These networks are not very usual outside of North America but very useful in cottage country. I have a friend, Alex in Canada that has a business doing this http://www.conxcom.ca/ <-- visit that site to see more about it.

Satellite has been mentioned. In very rare cases you can have TWO-WAY communication, but it is VERY expensive. Usually Satellite consists of a DOWNLINK from the bird, and the uplink goes via POTS plain Old telephone service. It's at least a 45,000 mile trip up to the satellite (greater when you consider the legs of the triangle) and back down to earth, but it can be very efficient in the sense that you usually RECIEVE more data than you transmit. That is, a browser request can be a very small packet versus the response from the server. VoIP applications are virtually useless, although the downlink can supply a huge amount of data, the propagation from server to your device takes FOREVER. Well, not forever forever, but the delay is quite pronounced. Think of at least 10,000 ms or more as normal.
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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by hugeh2o » Sat Mar 17, 2012 10:20 am

Wow! Super helpful info. Thank you thank you thank you.

Let me restate my specs:

[*]Location has weak cell service at 10 km from Pucon next to Trancura River. Moviestar is best reception with average of two bars for the internet card.
[*]Hostel guests- upto 30 guests at a time, often with more than 12 using internet at same time including downloads.

Here is what I have definitely learnt:
A. My internet knowledge is too basic to do without help.
B. satellite is out for my purposes.
C. Telsur or Frutillar are microwave options in area.
D. Huwaei POC Wireless Internet GPRS router- What are the advantages of this router? Is this the hands down recommended product?

Does this sound like a best plan:

Entel or Frutillar microwave service + Huwaei POC Wireless Internet GPRS router

Thank you.

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by admin » Sat Mar 17, 2012 11:21 am

Frutillar is a town in southern chile, not a service. Telsur is an internet service provider.

the GPRS modem, is just the same as a cell phone modem used split the signal for computers to share. So, if you have a bad signal, it is really not going to matter.

Most high end iphones and android phones now have an option to turn them in to adhoc wife routers for computers to share.

I really think you need someone to evaluate your situation where you are at.
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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by fraggle092 » Sat Mar 17, 2012 11:53 am

The simplest solution would be the one from Entel.
The Huawei B260 comes with an inbuilt wifi router, so setting up a wifi network would be done by the Entel installer. It also has an ethernet connection which could be used with an external router if desired although this would involve a lot of configuration of the kind you clearly want to avoid. It also has provision for an external 3G antenna which you would probably need in a low signal strength area, but I would guess that this wouldn't be available through Entel.
The only problem I foresee is that the unit they supply will come locked to their service, and with a maximum of 5 simultaneous users, but that's probably enough for a small place - for most of the time, anyway.
Entel's sale price for this device is actually quite reasonable at CLP $69.000; they have plans as well.

Here's a link

That would be the first option I would look at.
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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by Groschi » Sat Mar 17, 2012 1:19 pm

We use the D-Link 412 and it works fine with our Entel stick.
Image
I even use it daily with my voip hardware conected to it for voip phone calls, even for that its fast enough.
I think we paid CLP 28.000 for the D-Link412.

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by Groschi » Sat Mar 17, 2012 7:02 pm

Why are you all coming up with either terribly complicated or expensive solutions?????

Here is the link of the WIFI Router that works well with the stick he already has and will only cost him once 29.990 at Ripley:

http://www.ripley.cl/webapp/wcs/stores/ ... 335-130000

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by mlightheart » Sat Mar 17, 2012 7:41 pm

Groschi wrote:Why are you all coming up with either terribly complicated or expensive solutions?????

Here is the link of the WIFI Router that works well with the stick he already has and will only cost him once 29.990 at Ripley:

http://www.ripley.cl/webapp/wcs/stores/ ... 335-130000
:lol:

Groschi I am using the same set up that you are and it is working fine for me too. I am using VOIP too with Vonage. My wifi modem is a Huawei E367. I also have a E173 that I plan on using as a backup. The E367 is on a plan and the E173 is a prepay.

PC Factory has the DLink Dir-412 too. Here is a link along with two other routers for use with the modem. The Dir-412 is more expensive at PC Factory. I will have to see about getting one at Ripley, since the one I am using I borrowed from a friend to try out.

http://pcfactory.cl/?buscar=+Inalambrico+3G

The first speed test I did when I got the setup was 2075 kbs down and 300kbs. I just did a speed test at Entel (http://www.entelpcs.cl/speedtest/) and the results were 3130 kbps down and 591 kbps up. Oh, the reason for the difference might have been that Entel thought the modem number was on a limited plan. It was weird, but I got it straightened out yesterday.

I am thinking about getting a Cantenna (with a CRC9 adapter) for the modem. I could make my own, but I saw this rather inexpensive one on ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/BilcoWifi-20-db ... 5add3ca598

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by hugeh2o » Sat Mar 17, 2012 8:18 pm

Thank you again everyone.

Here are my thoughts on the suggestions:

A. Card + Router- My worry is too many users doing too many video uploads. This hostel is host to niche market whitewater kayakers. They are always watching, downloading and uploading blogs and videos. The hostel really needs to solve this problem.


** I agree with admin that local consult may be needed.

B. el Pueche's point, Buy a bunch of cards- Yes. I am considering this one. These guests want internet and will pay for it or take buses to Pucon to get it. While, I wanted to have a strong strong solution for everyone it may be best, most economical and easiest just to string up some cards.

**INternet location - is in a geodesic dome with tent type cover. My theory is this structure seems to boost reception.

C. Given there is secure reception via antenna- What would be the best case option for delivery to 10-ish users at same time?

Thank you.

David

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by zer0nz » Sat Mar 17, 2012 8:27 pm

you need to look at a uncapped data system via a business provider.. Claro, Entel, TelSur, anyone else who might work in the area

cards wont cut it for your operation, they will just piss off your customers and get them angry

you need quality and unlimited band width rather than speed........

a 1 or 2 meg Internet with a decent bandwidth sharing firewall/device to spread the load evenly amongst your connections so hoggers don't swamp the others.....

also as most will want international traffic, you would want 1:1 ration on your internet, that means the 2 meg you get, is your 2 meg, other companies do 1:3 others 1:6, imaging sharing that 2 meg with 6 other clients, and then your 10 users.... that could be 60 people fighting for that 2meg.....

its not going to be cheap, i would say you would pay about $250,000 per month if there is technology in your area... if not, then your out of luck!

the hostels i have stayed in with any type of shared 3g service were a joke, lots of pissed off back packers! :)

so start contacting all the business operators... if that fails, then microwave or wifi options, but not 3g...

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Re: rural wifi options?

Post by fraggle092 » Sun Mar 18, 2012 12:13 am

hugeh2o wrote: ......A. Card + Router- My worry is too many users doing too many video uploads. This hostel is host to niche market whitewater kayakers. They are always watching, downloading and uploading blogs and videos. The hostel really needs to solve this problem.
Most internet users don't care´how much bandwidth they occupy, so you will never have enough, no matter how much you get.
To sort that issue out, you need to control the service, which means learning a bit about networking, don´t expect to find many people here that can do that for you.

I have good connectivity through ADSL (6Mb/s), but I still use a traffic shaper in my router to limit the maximum allowable bandwidth per user in both directions, and also have a Captive Portal that logs them out after a few hours, just to gently discourage the bittorrenters. I don´t charge for the service, although I could if I wanted to as a time report per user is available, I wouldn't even consider trying this manually..
In the attached log, note user carlos, a wannabe freeloader who didn't get to use my wifi....
cportal.png
cportal.png (18.04 KiB) Viewed 1169 times
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