The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:42 pm

Interesting thing about the Chino stores, they seem to have been spared direct looting targeting vs. the big supermarket chains, the banks, the AFPs, VTR, the news outlet offices...
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One is to believe what isn't true;

the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by admin » Wed Dec 04, 2019 4:50 pm

the rating agencies seem to be taking the increase in debt in stride:

https://www.df.cl/noticias/economia-y-p ... 31555.html
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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by admin » Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:32 pm

the central bank is holding interest rates at 1.75%

https://www.emol.com/noticias/Economia/ ... l-175.html

I kind of suspected they were out of amo on the interest rate cuts when the last cut actually resulted in mortgage rates increasing.
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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by admin » Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:15 pm

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by hlf2888 » Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:23 pm

Jamers41 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:32 pm
hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:04 pm
Today, feria day, the owner of the Chinese store (like a Walmarts but smaller and more variety) was standing outside his store telling passersby "todo barato" over and over again and handing out candies. ????? He seemed so earnest, I remembered I needed the metallic folding car window shades 1 luca cada una, clothespins, 500 pesos, stainless steel pasta strainer, 1 luca and almost bought ramen noodles until my awareness of Chinese food standards forbade me. The cashier gave more candy. What is going on???

At the internet cafe, hours have become more humane. Now they actually close for 1.5 hours for lunch and open later and close earlier on Saturday. My favorite person there is happy. She used to eat lunch in a corner behind the counter. Things are changing in my little town. And we have had no crises, no vandalism, no breakins/robberies, no violence since day one. The only almost inconvenient incident was when the ninos closed the bridge for an hour on week two.
Out of curiosity, what town is this (if you don't mind stating)? Sounds pretty heavenly compared to Santiago Centro.
Sorry, I want it to stay off the radar. But it is probably typical for any small town not in a tourist area or near a large city. You cannot compare small towns with Santiago.

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by admin » Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:22 am

hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:23 pm
Jamers41 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:32 pm
hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:04 pm
Today, feria day, the owner of the Chinese store (like a Walmarts but smaller and more variety) was standing outside his store telling passersby "todo barato" over and over again and handing out candies. ????? He seemed so earnest, I remembered I needed the metallic folding car window shades 1 luca cada una, clothespins, 500 pesos, stainless steel pasta strainer, 1 luca and almost bought ramen noodles until my awareness of Chinese food standards forbade me. The cashier gave more candy. What is going on???

At the internet cafe, hours have become more humane. Now they actually close for 1.5 hours for lunch and open later and close earlier on Saturday. My favorite person there is happy. She used to eat lunch in a corner behind the counter. Things are changing in my little town. And we have had no crises, no vandalism, no breakins/robberies, no violence since day one. The only almost inconvenient incident was when the ninos closed the bridge for an hour on week two.
Out of curiosity, what town is this (if you don't mind stating)? Sounds pretty heavenly compared to Santiago Centro.
Sorry, I want it to stay off the radar. But it is probably typical for any small town not in a tourist area or near a large city. You cannot compare small towns with Santiago.
yea, there are thousands of small towns in chile that absolutely nothing happened in the middle of all this.

If you are living in a city, any city in the world, you are living in an illusion of civilization.
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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by Dosedmonkey » Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:46 am

admin wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:22 am

yea, there are thousands of small towns in chile that absolutely nothing happened in the middle of all this.

If you are living in a city, any city in the world, you are living in an illusion of civilization.
Sadly what happens in the cities eventually effects everyone out in the civilised places, whether it's exchange rates, change in law or collapse of the economy.

I was just thinking about how recent it is things have become urban. I don't know about Chile statistics, but the Industrial revolution in the UK was mad. In 1750 only 15% of the population lived in towns (not cities, just towns) by 1900 the population had increased by over double and 85% lived in towns.

Santiago populations; 383,587 inhabitants in 1907; 1,010,102 in 1940; 2,009,118 in 1960; 3,899,619 in 1982; and 4,729,118 in 1992

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by 41southchile » Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:51 am

Dosedmonkey wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:46 am
admin wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:22 am

yea, there are thousands of small towns in chile that absolutely nothing happened in the middle of all this.

If you are living in a city, any city in the world, you are living in an illusion of civilization.
Sadly what happens in the cities eventually effects everyone out in the civilised places, whether it's exchange rates, change in law or collapse of the economy.

I was just thinking about how recent it is things have become urban. I don't know about Chile statistics, but the Industrial revolution in the UK was mad. In 1750 only 15% of the population lived in towns (not cities, just towns) by 1900 the population had increased by over double and 85% lived in towns.
I can't remember the exact stats but its something very similar for Chile between 1960 and 2010 , it flipped from 20 to 80 percent urban versus rural to 85 to 15 urban versus rural, I think from memory was something like that.
Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge: it is those who know little, not those who know much, who so positively assert that this or that problem will never be solved by science. - Darwin

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by tiagoabner » Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:32 am

There are lots of reasons why people live in cities, though. Access to more job opportunities, better healthcare, culture. Although yeah, shit blows up in the cities when it comes to that.
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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by Jamers41 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:52 am

hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:23 pm
Jamers41 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:32 pm
hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:04 pm
Today, feria day, the owner of the Chinese store (like a Walmarts but smaller and more variety) was standing outside his store telling passersby "todo barato" over and over again and handing out candies. ????? He seemed so earnest, I remembered I needed the metallic folding car window shades 1 luca cada una, clothespins, 500 pesos, stainless steel pasta strainer, 1 luca and almost bought ramen noodles until my awareness of Chinese food standards forbade me. The cashier gave more candy. What is going on???

At the internet cafe, hours have become more humane. Now they actually close for 1.5 hours for lunch and open later and close earlier on Saturday. My favorite person there is happy. She used to eat lunch in a corner behind the counter. Things are changing in my little town. And we have had no crises, no vandalism, no breakins/robberies, no violence since day one. The only almost inconvenient incident was when the ninos closed the bridge for an hour on week two.
Out of curiosity, what town is this (if you don't mind stating)? Sounds pretty heavenly compared to Santiago Centro.
Sorry, I want it to stay off the radar. But it is probably typical for any small town not in a tourist area or near a large city. You cannot compare small towns with Santiago.
Fair enough. I'm not really trying to compare any small town to downtown Santiago, that would be absurd, just pointing out how nuts Santiago Centro is since that's where I currently work.

I am aware that you are in the Maule region and I have a friend who lives in Hualañé, so I was just curious if it was close to there.

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by hlf2888 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:28 am

Jamers41 wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:52 am
hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:23 pm
Jamers41 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:32 pm
hlf2888 wrote:
Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:04 pm
Today, feria day, the owner of the Chinese store (like a Walmarts but smaller and more variety) was standing outside his store telling passersby "todo barato" over and over again and handing out candies. ????? He seemed so earnest, I remembered I needed the metallic folding car window shades 1 luca cada una, clothespins, 500 pesos, stainless steel pasta strainer, 1 luca and almost bought ramen noodles until my awareness of Chinese food standards forbade me. The cashier gave more candy. What is going on???

At the internet cafe, hours have become more humane. Now they actually close for 1.5 hours for lunch and open later and close earlier on Saturday. My favorite person there is happy. She used to eat lunch in a corner behind the counter. Things are changing in my little town. And we have had no crises, no vandalism, no breakins/robberies, no violence since day one. The only almost inconvenient incident was when the ninos closed the bridge for an hour on week two.
Out of curiosity, what town is this (if you don't mind stating)? Sounds pretty heavenly compared to Santiago Centro.
Sorry, I want it to stay off the radar. But it is probably typical for any small town not in a tourist area or near a large city. You cannot compare small towns with Santiago.
Fair enough. I'm not really trying to compare any small town to downtown Santiago, that would be absurd, just pointing out how nuts Santiago Centro is since that's where I currently work.

I am aware that you are in the Maule region and I have a friend who lives in Hualañé, so I was just curious if it was close to there.
Sorry you have to work in Santiago, aren't things equally peaceful in Hualane, as here? I have always avoided touristy places. Tourists erode the social fabric of the small towns and communities with their big-city values, their need for instant gratification, their need to celebrate their brief stints of freedom by partying, drugging and drinking, and making lots of noise, and their sense of entitlement (try driving slowly in front of a tourist) and their value system of money over family. Guess that's how they get the money to be tourists and buy those second homes. I understand their frustration but really do my best to avoid them.

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Re: The Economic Impact of the Social Crisis

Post by Jamers41 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:04 am

Hualañé is just some little town between Curicó and the coast (Iloca/Duao) along a river valley. I assume that it's pretty peaceful, I myself have just driven through it once and have not been to my friend's house (I found out she was from there well after having driven through the area several years ago).

Hualañé is not what I would call a tourist trap by any means, it's just a little town. The reason your town sparked my interest more than anything was the anecdote about the Chinos, I was surprised there would be any Chinese in such a small place, so hence the curiosity. Then again, I remember going to Villarrica 3+ years ago and being surprised to see multiple large Chinese warehouses there (and the Chinese workers had pretty bad Spanish too xD ).

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