running electrical in both 220 and 110?

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Kel
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by Kel » Thu Jun 28, 2012 12:51 pm

MikieO wrote:I haven't bothered to read the entire thread but the gist of what Px said is correct. I have however, done what the original poster asked about and
have found it to be a very valuable feature in my house.
While we were in the framing stages (back in 09) of my place in region V I told my Chilean electrician to get an upgraded drop from the pole (25amps instead
of the usual 16Amps) it had to be done twice and we paid more but there yah go, it's Chile. :roll: I brought a 4kw step up/step down transformer in my hand
luggage (44lbs) and had the electrician size a dedicated outlet in the garage to service it. I also brought (from Home Depot) a couple of boxes of
outlets, nail on boxes, a 6X6 junction box, twist connectors and one 20amp heavy duty switch.
I had him run the 220v through the US switch to the transformer outlet below. From there, I used 12Ga locally sourced romex (sort of...it has no ground)
that I ran myself, (I am a GC)
Long story short, I have a US outlet in every room in the house and several in the garage. Trying to find certain things in Chile takes so long that it just isn't
worth it. I was able to do a better job, faster, using US voltage tools than had I just tried to muddle through in the Chilean way.
Example:
I brought a silent Panasonic duct fan and put it in the attic with some ductwork for redistribution of the Bosca's heat, taken from the peak in
the living room to the bedrooms etc in the other end of the house. Works beautifully. Chilean equivalent? sounds like a jet engine.
IMO one can simply produce a higher standard home with this option, it certainly worked for me and that's what I do for a living. :mrgreen:

BTW, the TSA gal who looked askance at the transformer.... priceless. The Chilean customs guy? Another one.... :roll:
I know I could have gotten one in Chile but in the US, a click of a mouse and it was delivered. I regard time spent on site
as the equivalent of diver's "bottom time", use it to max effect.
:!: Yes! Thats how it should be done :!: You Said it with perfect Clarity :!:

:!: Thanks :!:
Taking aim from the grassy knoll...

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GOTI
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by GOTI » Thu Jun 28, 2012 8:14 pm

Kel wrote:
MikieO wrote:I haven't bothered to read the entire thread but the gist of what Px said is correct. I have however, done what the original poster asked about and
have found it to be a very valuable feature in my house.
While we were in the framing stages (back in 09) of my place in region V I told my Chilean electrician to get an upgraded drop from the pole (25amps instead
of the usual 16Amps) it had to be done twice and we paid more but there yah go, it's Chile. :roll: I brought a 4kw step up/step down transformer in my hand
luggage (44lbs) and had the electrician size a dedicated outlet in the garage to service it. I also brought (from Home Depot) a couple of boxes of
outlets, nail on boxes, a 6X6 junction box, twist connectors and one 20amp heavy duty switch.
I had him run the 220v through the US switch to the transformer outlet below. From there, I used 12Ga locally sourced romex (sort of...it has no ground)
that I ran myself, (I am a GC)
Long story short, I have a US outlet in every room in the house and several in the garage. Trying to find certain things in Chile takes so long that it just isn't
worth it. I was able to do a better job, faster, using US voltage tools than had I just tried to muddle through in the Chilean way.
Example:
I brought a silent Panasonic duct fan and put it in the attic with some ductwork for redistribution of the Bosca's heat, taken from the peak in
the living room to the bedrooms etc in the other end of the house. Works beautifully. Chilean equivalent? sounds like a jet engine.
IMO one can simply produce a higher standard home with this option, it certainly worked for me and that's what I do for a living. :mrgreen:

BTW, the TSA gal who looked askance at the transformer.... priceless. The Chilean customs guy? Another one.... :roll:
I know I could have gotten one in Chile but in the US, a click of a mouse and it was delivered. I regard time spent on site
as the equivalent of diver's "bottom time", use it to max effect.
:!: Yes! Thats how it should be done :!: You Said it with perfect Clarity :!:

:!: Thanks :!:
GREETINGS TO KEL/PATAGONIAX/ AND MIKEIO >> Sorry for my late followup in this forum...been in travel. I appreciate the details of each of your input and speculation on my goal. Actually, MikeiO was closest to my objectives. First, I explain my Site setting and services available: My tract of land is approximately 600 meters from a public service line with enough power to service my proposed buildings; the other 3-sides of adjoining land are public mountain-side land. There is a closer retired native lady neighbor with an insufficient two-line extension from primary service but only enough to carry 15amp max. Secondly, I plan to build three structures on my vacant Land tract: House, machine shop, and utility garden/studio (wife's). The house to have all new wiring with some leads for AC 110 60hZ to operate some U.S. appliances too expensive to replace /A machine shop to operate a wood planer - 8.5 hp Milwaukee Drill press (12amp) / and a Miller Arc-Welder and Compressor (60hZ). / the Studio for smaller compressor-- marble grinder and multiple outlets (50 hz) standard Chilean products. To add, power to operate a well pump to elevate 60 ft/19m to storage tank 25ft/85m away from well crevice (quebrada). The Generator Plant I described herein meets most of those needs. Third, to bring in the necessary public service power, I would have to have proper gauged conduit and transformer. At this time, I have no estimate of cost that it would take and schedule-time for installation. The Generator would be ready upon my arrival. Therein, is my Task. It looks as if I am trying to develop a little LAND-OF-OZ (anyone have guinea hens :?:
From the homeland of the infamous Dorothy; we found the Land of Oz

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MikieO
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by MikieO » Fri Jun 29, 2012 2:48 pm

AWG 12 in conduit: 32 amps
outside of conduit, in air 40 amps
While I'll take it as true, those specs do seem sketchy, I am surprised.
I noted that my 25Amp service drop was in 12 Ga though, go figure.
“Now, a lifetime of experience has left me bitter and cynical.” ~ Calvin & Hobbes

HybridAmbassador
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Jun 29, 2012 4:55 pm

Why is low Amperage used in Chile house electricity? My house came with 100 Amp wired electrical system.. The older US house were rigged with 60 Amp,
the newer houses has 100 Amp or even 200 Amps. I remember that in Japan,
a normal house can be had with 20 Amp~65 Amps..
So why does Chileans house construction use such low Amperage? I believe it is so easy to overload the circuit with a such puny low Amperage?
HybridAmbassador. Toyota Hybrid system for helping climate change.

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MikieO
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by MikieO » Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:38 pm

HybridAmbassador wrote:Why is low Amperage used in Chile house electricity? My house came with 100 Amp wired electrical system.. The older US house were rigged with 60 Amp,
the newer houses has 100 Amp or even 200 Amps. I remember that in Japan,
a normal house can be had with 20 Amp~65 Amps..
So why does Chileans house construction use such low Amperage? I believe it is so easy to overload the circuit with a such puny low Amperage?
You now hail from SF or Japan?
The standard US drop/panel in my experience is now 200Amp.
In my more "power hungry" clients' homes I am regularly seeing 400Amp services.
Why? It costs money to buy the gear to use those panels, wire the home etc.
Why 16Amps? Chileans don't usually have the $ so 16 Amps, two breakers is the norm,
I mean really, this afternoon I was packing and saw that I have 4 smoke alarms....
Standard? Why am I bringing them from Home Depot? Because Sodimac didn't have
them in store (YMMV) and it's more efficient to just bring them!
There's more to const in Chile than just shitty work.
“Now, a lifetime of experience has left me bitter and cynical.” ~ Calvin & Hobbes

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MikieO
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Re: running electrical in both 220 and 110?

Post by MikieO » Sat Jun 30, 2012 11:01 pm

Aha, thankee! I noticed nobody nodding when I said "Romex". No matter, I think that for now I am past that.
I'd imagine that NW diver will have a lot of fun with his PV setup, conductors and DC unless he is flying in a PV crew too.
One can just see how that could turn out, from the missing PV panels down to the undersized conductors.... :roll:
“Now, a lifetime of experience has left me bitter and cynical.” ~ Calvin & Hobbes

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