Where Should I Start?

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fraggle092
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by fraggle092 » Mon Oct 07, 2019 4:17 pm

Sr. El Puelche wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 2:24 pm
Have never heard mention of carnet with a clipped corner on a carnet-------what do you mean when you say non-militant? and why would it matter and to who would it matter?
By "militant" I actually meant a member of the Communist or Socialist parties. Militante is just the generic description for a paid-up member of any political party.
An intact carnet supposedly was clandestine identification, like the folded-up banknote you mentioned.
Sr. El Puelche wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 2:24 pm
Any background on this, like where you heard about it. This is very interesting.
I heard it first-hand some years ago from a member of my wife's family who was travelling on an intercity bus on the day of the coup. The bus was stopped by armed troops, in Concepción, I believe. Passengers were roughly ordered off the bus and herded into the bus terminal, where their carnets were scrutinized. The ones that had intact carnets were separated from the other passengers and taken away, the others were eventually allowed to resume their journeys after questioning.

That's the only time I have ever heard of this practice, and was curious to know if in fact it was true..

Note in the attached pic that this example has two distinct cuts, with the text referring to the RH one only.
(click to expand)
Memorias del Siglo XX - Archivo Nacional de Chile.png
https://www.memoriasdelsigloxx.cl/601/w ... 90756.html
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Sr. El Puelche
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Tue Oct 08, 2019 4:46 pm

Okay had to read and re-read your post Fraggle------while i understand your core question and pondering over a clipped carnet, I don't understand the back story on it----not doubting or scrutinizing what you are saying----just don't understand, and it's a couple things-----

So to start-----someone has a clipped carnet
How would this identify them and to whom?----what is the signal the cut corner is designed to hold?
The photo post write up indicates the bearer voted in the plebiscite----so it proof---but also, think of it, the bearer maybe did not vote and clipped the corner himself to avoid issues.

Would this be done by the bearer or an official?
What would be the advantage of it?------The bearer themselves could cut the corner off for an advantage?-----if there were issues, the bearer could say their carnet was lost and apply for a new one.

In your intercity bus situation on the day of the coup-----so if the cuts indicate a militant bearer, why would the intact carnet holders be held and the "others"-----with cut carnets be allowed to continue on? Militants would logically be held for investigation?

I am thinking that if there is something to it------A carnet was clipped after the coup by authorities in the aftermath of an investigation or questioning with the bearer as a signal to any authority in the future in reviewing the carnet and could take appropriate measures.

And again, the bearer could also just "loose" their carnet and apply for a new one------yes a total hassle to do, but better than being marked.

Gonna ask around in regard to this----very curious what the logic and situation would be for all of this----thank you for posting it----The interesting is that generally there all kinds of addendum stories out of it.


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fraggle092
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by fraggle092 » Tue Oct 08, 2019 11:33 pm

Fuller answer below.
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fraggle092
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by fraggle092 » Tue Oct 08, 2019 11:55 pm

Sr. El Puelche wrote:
Tue Oct 08, 2019 4:46 pm
Okay had to read and re-read your post Fraggle------while i understand your core question and pondering over a clipped carnet, I don't understand the back story on it----not doubting or scrutinizing what you are saying----just don't understand, and it's a couple things-----

So to start-----someone has a clipped carnet
How would this identify them and to whom?----what is the signal the cut corner is designed to hold?
It meant that the bearer is not an "insider" with links to the UP. So no preferential treatment.

The photo post write up indicates the bearer voted in the plebiscite----so it proof---but also, think of it, the bearer maybe did not vote and clipped the corner himself to avoid issues.
The text also mentions a validatory stamp as further proof of voting

Would this be done by the bearer or an official?
Could have been done at any level of the infiltrated bureaucracy, from the JAP and municipalities all the way up to the Registro Civil itself.

What would be the advantage of it?------The bearer themselves could cut the corner off for an advantage?-----if there were issues, the bearer could say their carnet was lost and apply for a new one.
It was a disadvantage for reasons that are hopefully obvious.

In your intercity bus situation on the day of the coup-----so if the cuts indicate a militant bearer, why would the intact carnet holders be held and the "others"-----with cut carnets be allowed to continue on? Militants would logically be held for investigation?
Cut Carnet = NON-militant

I am thinking that if there is something to it------A carnet was clipped after the coup by authorities in the aftermath of an investigation or questioning with the bearer as a signal to any authority in the future in reviewing the carnet and could take appropriate measures.
Not the situation I described at all.

And again, the bearer could also just "loose" their carnet and apply for a new one------yes a total hassle to do, but better than being marked.
Not if the Registro Civil was doing it in the first place!
Gonna ask around in regard to this----very curious what the logic and situation would be for all of this----thank you for posting it----The interesting is that generally there all kinds of addendum stories out of it.


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Sorry to sidetrack your interesting saga, will try asking around some more.
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Sr. El Puelche
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Wed Oct 09, 2019 4:50 pm

Hey Fraggle, No problem------this is an interesting aspect of that time and will ask around about it.


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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by mlightheart » Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:52 pm

Welcome back El P! I will have to start reading from the beginning of this thread.

Sr. El Puelche
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:41 am

Thank you might heart, enjoy the reading and please comment on anything as we go.

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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:43 am

Also, that summer, I made friends and started hanging out with a Chilean guy that worked as a manager at a downtown shop in La Serena. We hung out at the beach, took day trips with other friends as well as went out to eat and generally had a good time.

We were set to go out one evening and to meet up at his apartment at around 10 pm. I got there a little early and sat down in the living room. His roommate was there and getting ready to go out but not with us. I can’t remember his name but he was taking forever to get ready and I was hungry. I went to check on him as he was acting a little strange and generally harass him for taking so long. Entering his bedroom I noticed several cookie trays laid out with what looked like dried cilantro but of course it wasn’t——it was mota, pot. I stared for a moment and said to him, “Is that pot?” He smiled and said yes and said he had coke too if I wanted it.

Ahhhh, it became clear to me at that moment. When I first met him, he was a little to shiny, too well dressed and a little to slick. So it figured he was dealing drugs.

I immediately told him I was not into being friends with anyone that had anything to do with drugs. In hanging out with any number of young Chileans, this was the first time anything with drugs had come up———it just was not anything anyone talked about or was remotely involved with from my experience. He protested, and I told him not to contact me for any reason in the future.

At that time, any amount of pot was a minimum 20 year sentence. Chile and Pinochet were very serious about drugs at the time. I was never into any drugs anyway and was not going to get hauled in for being around it——absolutely not worth it.

Pinochet started getting headaches over Col. Manuel Contreras starting about 2004 I think?——Contreras and Pinochet had been friends——Contreras had been head of the DINA where it was thought he was involved in the Pratts assassination as well as the Otelier assassination as well as the overall executions of militant communists and others———I don’t know anything about it but probably true and the courts handled it and he is dead now anyway——not what I am talking about anyway. Contreras stated in public he had proof Pinochet, along with his son was running drugs and it how he came to have the 30 odd million dollars in overseas banks—Pinochet that is.

Now, I heard this from a military person and was not there so can’t say more than that as to the truth of it all——At the time, as it was explained to me, in the early 70’s Peru was the major source for cocaine, growing and manufacturing the base——the primary export point was Chile via Bolivia. Pinochet took over in 1973 and was not digging the whole gig. According to what I was told cocaine was pushed out through Chile in the north (not so now after the death of Escobar and the rise of the Arellano Felix Sinoloa cartel in Mexico but more on that later)——probably, on the thought from cocaine producers that it would not be a pinpoint concern for cocaine to come out of Chile——Pinochet spent his early military career in the north of Chile and he most likely knew and had all the intel on it———you could consider it a back country assignment but really with Peru and Bolivia and the war of the pacific——still politics rule hard for that region——the southern border with Argentina was and is a given deal——but not the north——get the pope talking and on your side and you could be on the wrong end of the stick——so the north was a critical assignment and Pinochet got it when he started out——SIDE NOTE: Pinochet was part of the comandtura for leftists sent to camps in the north when the government in the 40’s and 50’s wanted to send them away to calm down——he knew all of them and they knew him.

Its a fine line now——the US government, as well as northern south america jungle democracies were allowing informal drug levies on passage of goods to fund anti-communist militias with support including weapons etc——For south america it was the early to mid 70’s and for the US, from what we know, it was not until the early 80’s——kind of an Iran/contra affair going on but on the same continent and within the same country. Governments were allowing things to go on where officials made a little scratch and other monies were allowed to buy what they had to in order to allow personnel, weapons and support to put down the militant left.——Everybody has a budget——your own remodel, a business start up, a wedding, a round the world trip——the money has to come from somewhere and if/when everyone is having a good time, no one asks who bought the champagne.

In this time I was told the Chilean Army had the information a meeting of drug traffickers was going to take place just over the border from Peru in the north——this would have been in the mid 70’s. The Chilean Army was there and had all of them together with which they executed somewhere over a hundred in one initial swipe. From what I was told it was done with extreme prejudice. Pinochet was serious about drugs.

Back to Pinochet’s Riggs bank money———I don’t think they uncovered other monies either in Chile or outside other than the 30 odd million, For the amount of money cocaine brought in during that time, 30 million does not seem like the amount that would be remotely congruent with what cocaine was bringing in——A dirty dictator is gonna settle for just 30 million?----it does not seem likely and would/should have been more in the realm of a billion at least.

More up next time on how, I think Pinochet, made the money he had in the bank.

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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Sun Oct 13, 2019 11:30 pm

Completely forgot about this aspect of the military governance in Chile during my first summer there and then later on in 1986 up to 1989-----Reviewing the situation in Ecuador in recent days, it came back.

Acuartelamiento------A condition in Chile whereby all troops are confined to barracks in the anticipation of a major action.

The military would declare it and with it cut off all communication with the public and media in all aspects. Typically in Chile the families of Carabineros and military at the time lived with the confines of the base in what would be described as "base housing." Troops and families would be forbidden to leave the base or the barracks. Typically it would be after major "attentados" on the part of the communists and usually after a spate of several, close together in time and critical to the function of daily life.

A declared "Acuartelamiento" did not mean major action on the part of the military but it meant the military was more than very serious about taking aggressive action----In Chile, it never came to that but it there were very tense days as everyone waited it out-----Not specifically knowing what the action would be but most likely tanks in the street, massive road blocks, wholesale searches of poblaciones as well as individual homes everywhere and very limited public movement. The saber rattling was meant, I think, to motivate the troops to pending action and to broadcast to the general public the seriousness of current issues----it was very effective. News anchors would report and comment on the status of the acuartelamiento in a grave tone, measuring their words so as not to alarm viewers nor maybe giveaway what they knew to be the true situation.

Apart from the military announcement done on tv and radio as well as in print----all communication was cut off----apart from the condition of a curfew, there was no military on the street. Military buildings as well as regional and municipal building were sandbagged at entrances and up above the first floor-----like London during the blitz in WWII. Soldiers were on guard in full battle gear around the clock-----the attitude was they would not talk to you on approach for any reason----One day, two days, three days and everyone was nervous. I don't remember it going on beyond 6 or 7 days.

I think an acaurtelaminento was done primarily to isolate and inure troops to the action that would take place. Mostly on any given day there were military trucks on the street here and there on normal business-----military officers toting briefcase in regular grey street dress were abundant in Santiago-----during this time Pinochet had placed military officers in regional to municipal positions all over the country that would normally be held by civil servants-----I took my drivers license test in La Serena from an army lieutenant that was placed in charge of that department. I got my retail sales license from an army lieutenant in charge of licensing----all regional governors were army officers at the level of colonel. And it was everything in between------An acuartelamiento called them all back to barracks and effectively grinding Chile to a halt for anything to be done in the normal course of life and business.

Secondly,inside the barracks, troops were drilled for action with the intent by the high command to leech out any softness they might have in the action to come. The Chilean public new this and they were scared for it. Part of the security as well was that military families were protected within compounds and barracks-----officers usually had homes outside the confines of a base but they were brought in as well.

Thirdly, I think it was, on the part of the military, to chill everyone down-----no one knew what was going to happen and it somehow it conveyed to the public, the seriousness of the situation------maybe a little harsh to say it this way but it was the military's way, in action not words, that it would be total war on the Chilean public if they were ordered to----a very simple and more than strong warning where nothing was held back and people were going to die.

Ecuador has not announced an acuartelamineto at this point from what I have read about it---most likely, they did not have time as the protests have been very strong in the street and the president ordered the military to make order in the street. For what I experienced in the street in Chile with protests----it was never that bad across the board----In small confined areas it approached it but not really----approaching what I have seen in photos in Ecuador as of late and as well in Venezuela over the last years------in Chile it would have been an all out confrontation and people would have been shot with out any compunction on the part of Carabineros or the army-----aggressive, brutal and without hesitation during Pinochet-----not a half dozen dead but hundreds----no doubt about it. People knew this by all means so while protests and atentados on the part of communists where there, it was always very directed and everyone knew where to let it all calm down way before it got to anything going on like what it is in Ecuador or Venezuela.

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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Mon Oct 14, 2019 11:03 pm

**************
No one can live for very long without getting a nickname in Chile. Usually very descriptive and pretty accurate——sometimes not very flattering so you hoped you got a good one. Don’t think that as tourist visiting Chile for a few days you don’t get a nickname but as just a passerby, you won’t know or hear what it is———kitchen staff, maids, and any regulars you come across for your few days will have one for you.

I got mine pretty quick and the amazing thing honestly was that through out my years in Chile, and from one end to the other it was the same nickname——its not like anyone called ahead of where I was going to tell Chileans there, like some underground network, that “El Joven” was coming. I think its a universal gift of observation and a common vision they have for who people are at their core———maybe similar for how the italian mafia name each other for traits they show up with. Always very accurate if not pretty clever and direct you in what that person is about without knowing too much from who they are. Unfortunately, if you are called out with whatever nickname you get, there is no changing it——you just get what you get and its forever.

Gordo or “fatty” if you are a little plump, Napo or “Napoleon” for someone that is bossy, Pecos or “freckles” if you have them, if you personify someone that appears as someone famous, you will be “Sammy” for “Sammy Davis Jr.” or flaco if you are skinny, or nubes or “clouds” if you are tall, maybe Pelota or “ball” if your head is round, Pelado if you are bald, Piernas if you have nice legs or have long legs, Palo if you have a funny or unusual face———you get the idea.

Now there are other non-directed nicknames for Chilean to Chilean where they want to communicate not knowing the person directly and someone you are unlikely to come across again, Loco, guevon, jefe, mi cabo or mi sarjento——usually while talking with a carabinero——when done effectively, my ccorporal or my sargeant, is purposely assigning a rank higher than they are in an attempt to acknowledge the carabinero’s “obvious” superiority----and get out of a ticket or other issue.

There are generalized nicknames or maybe better called, a moniker, to describe social types across Chilean society——so say you buy jewelry, scarf or hat off the street and some asks where you got it——“Esa artesa por alli en la equina——it really means more than “hippie” and is for women only. A quico or quica would be an entitled wealthy snob of a person, male or female of any age——usually also identified by that special accent they have. Carabineros are “Pacos” but never to their place——named I think by Condorito comic book character as very Carabinero depicted goes by the name of “Paco.” el viejo and la vieja are obvious. “Negro” was for anyone with a dark complexion and not taken in anyway as an affront——would be common for a wife to refer to her husband as “Negro.” “Jubilado” (retired) would be any middle aged guy, well dressed and while not poor, but common in slacks, a buttoned shirt and sweater with a knitted cap——somebody sitting on a park bench in this case or ambling about and in no hurry to get anywhere.

Of course “Milico” was common during this time to describe not a Carabinero but army guy——no difference in conscript, sergeant or officer——could be used for anyone in military dress or “andandando como civil” or in civilian dress——a certain type of clothes, all pressed, and a severe haircut and shaved. If you went to a barbershop and they asked what you wanted you could say “como malico” and you would have very short hair. Women carabineros were called “tortugas maquilladas” because with their stylized caps they looked like a turtle. “Me frego esa tortuga maguillada con un parte, guevon, como lo voy a pagar?"

There was fleto and maricon----now these could be controversial in today’s world but in Chile at the time, no big deal——fleto, literally meaning gay but would be referenced as an effeminate male and maricon as “fag” or “queer”——typically it would be in reference to someone you had an issue with——so a salesmen that caused you trouble or a slow walker in the crosswalk——a maricon would be shouted out to someone that cut you off or almost crashed into you——fleto, not so much fighting words but maricon definitely would be if it was heard or they could get at you. Puto and Puta———not really used alone in this sense of a moniker----unless combined in the instance of "puto marion!"-----apart from that, Puto or Puta, more of a profession so not really a moniker. Can’t think of any other social nicknames right now, can anyone else?——there was the typical “ladron, lanza, and others but again more of a profession.

Now “flaite” is a more recent word and references what in modern Chile had been a “roto.” To be clear a “roto” would be someone like a hobo and unemployed and came about I think in the 20’s and solidified in the 30’s with the social unrest and unemployment. Mostly harmless, the roto was poor and typically in groups would be on strike and kind of mobbish——not necessarily criminal. The flaite came about as a result of time spent in jail. Not only an accent in identifying them but also a code of dress, jewelry, grooming (the soccer mullet) as well as their own vocabulary——really it comes down to something they could display to others in order to illustrate (in an obvious way and at first unspoken) their criminal background. Developed mostly in jail and then on the street, once free——maybe it could be compared to the cockney accent in London although not all cockneys were criminals for sure——so as flaites returned to street life, maybe returning to jail and bringing with them street cred——a definite advantage in jail and separating them apart from lesser non-career criminals——over a short time it has become a regular low class accent, criminal or not, that helps them make their way.

On to “Gringo!”———now with my experience in Mexico, Gringo was an insult——in Chile, not at all. Took me awhile to adjust to it but after awhile I knew it was not necessarily something to be upset about——Now “Gabacho” which essentially meant “Whitey” or maybe “Invader” was a term not used except for an insult——have to be careful with that one especially “Gabacho Culiado” which translates to “f**king Whitey”———this was bad. Now in terms of people close to you, it changed to something affectionate at times and spoken say if you won a bet or scored a goal over a Chilean-----maybe an off way of saying "good job or you got me asshole!"

“Lukas” a cartoonist of the time, published a daily cartoon on the third page of “El Mercurio” at the time———mostly social commentary with observations on everything from the curfew, food prices, carabineros, driving, married life, boyfriend & girlfriend, crime, family time, holidays, the international scene, money issues, sports, work life in all aspects. An Italian immigrant, he lived in Vina or Valpo, had a gift for not only capturing the Chilean character in a drawing but also in language and commentary but also the view of all Chileans——good source and fun read for understanding Chile——after his death, a cartoonist by the name of “Jimmy Smitts” (I think that was his name?) took over and while good, not as good as Lukas——maybe hard to find Lukas cartoons on the internet but he did publish books with his cartoons, so a second hand book shop would be a good spot if not extended editions and compilations of his work.

In the word of piropos——traditionally a comment made on the street, almost exclusively said by a man to a woman, as a form of flirting with no real hope of reaction on the part of the woman and nearly certain with no reaction or any kind of receptive attitude. Usually pretty clever and made up on the spot, they are generally pretty funny and while it may only be a covered smile the flirter will never see it. Many Chilean women told me it was common for them to share with other Chilenas the piropos of the day. Many Chilean woman I knew would actually be a little down if they didn’t get a piropo in the day——maybe a certain pride they garnered someone’s attention. Sometimes very suggestive and on occasion even vulgar but mostly just clever and seemed to be composed on the spot inspired by some aspect of the woman’s appearance at that moment.

I have to reiterate that a piropo is not meant as a pick-up line as you would find in the United States but just a one or two line poem meant just for that woman at that time and on that day. I have never uttered a piropo because just not my thing but also I think a piropo on the part of a non-chilean would be taken as an offense and would most likely generate a quick worded response by a Chilean woman. I’d say there is a range of Chilean men socially that are allowed the convenience of using the piropo. Its important to point out as well, piropos are best delivered where only the target can hear it and not shouted across the street———meant not to embarrass directly but to show appreciation and vent a secret naughty desire the male is wishing to express and not able to do officially and unpunished anywhere else.

I can only think of one that I heard on the street right now “If you were a piece of candy, I’d eat you up,” and pretty innocent at that. There are dozens of classic ones and adjusted for the moment which made it pretty comical to overhear.

Edited 10-15-19------Thought of another nickname and a good one------Chascon or Chascona, which roughly translates to "scruffy"----maybe a little because the person is just taking care of themselves but mostly their general look----a girl or boy student at the best of Chilean schools could be called Chascon or Chascona for their overall unkept appearance.

Thought of another one-----lolo and lola-----a young guy or gal maybe between the ages of 17 to 24----youthful and say dressed in moderately fashionable clothes to very fashionable-----probably comes from pololo or polala which means "boyfriend or girlfriend. Definitely a general term or moniker for describing someone not known to you and not an individual nickname.

****I will often add points and edit posts----so readers might not go back and read a post and will miss details-----from now on when I edit a post I will note it with several "********" at the top of the entry-----which will probably mean all of them before I am done!


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Sr. El Puelche
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Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by Sr. El Puelche » Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:54 pm

So was thinking about nicknames……”Gatito…”

Gatito was a native of La Serena and born in 1884 which made him about 103 when I met him. I have no idea his actual name, he was just Gatito because…..he looked like a cat of course. Little round head, little whiskers he never shaved and always up to something like a cat would be. He was hard to understand because he would giggle between sentences and words. Gatito lived in old La Serena along the Elqui River just a block or two down from the bridge to Compania Alta on the ocean side. There was a small street there parallel to the river with a simple row of homes that made the northern edge of La Serena. Every block of course there were streets with just three or four homes on each side on that slope that led down the berm to the Elqui but were only dirt and rock. Gatitio lived in one of the last homes on one of those streets and just maybe just a meter above the riverbed.

An adobe home, it was really the end of the line, with walls slightly buried in the silt left by the Elqui when it rose high and wide enough. It did not happen every year but when the Elqui spread her waters high and wide his house would be half submerged with water pulling through the windows and doors. I asked Gatito about how he coped with the current plowing through the house and he explained long ago he had put his bed on stilts and got a good wash when he jumped out of bed. Also he explained, he could sit at his dining room table and fish and his catch right to cooking, could not fresher than that he said.

I met Gatito when I rented a shop for my business just in old Serena just a few blocks from where he lived——he happened to be the maintenance man for the “complex if you could call it that. Another story about how I found it and the landlord I leased from——Basically, in those days, old Serena was maintained as mostly low slung adobe buildings. The Spanish laid it out close to the river for water I am sure and there it was.

A typical Spanish city in the Americas was a hundred meters by a hundred meters with streets in between. The adobe homes were continuous with just a shared adobe wall in between separating families. Typically in the middle of the block on all sides was an open carriage way for bringing in courts. The middle area of the block was for tying up animals, storing of carts at night as well as a wash area for laundering as well as a place for children to play as each home had a back access to this interior area——in its design it probably served as defense against anything from indians or marauders. The area was communal in a respect but as Chile modernized and land/home ownership, things had to be lined out for who owned what.

The shop I rented was an open area like this but all that remained of what had been a larger area——now all filled with homes except for our small open area maybe 50 meters by 40 meters. The original carriageway, a large metal gate at the street, led to this open area. The main Reten de Carabineros was just two blocks up so the owner had made closed in garages along the perimeter for officers with cars to park them there. A large courtyard remained with a single apartment he rented to a woman that was a school teacher by day and lets just say special activities after school. The landlord had a small shed he stored things in and apart from that a sheet metal shop and the shop I rented.

Not going into my business venture——cost me thousands, a total failure but I learned my lesson about doing business in Chile——another story. Still I went every day, had an employee and an office downtown.

Now back to Gatito——He’d come most days if not all to repair the shaggy doors on the garages, sweep the dirt and repair the adobe walls we worked within. Always busy, he had a small transistor radio he played at full volumn with music or the game as he religiously played “Polla Gol.” Gatito would come in for tea at once time and we’d hang out with him telling me stories and we became good friends. The school teacher, ojalatero as well as the landlord and myself kept an eye on him——the landlord did not really need anybody but had him working anyway. Gatito would come by for all my sawdust every week as well as bottle caps. The saw dust he would pack into a tennis ball can which had no top or bottom. He had a bar he would set in the middle and pack sawdust into after wetting it. When dry he’d push out the “log” and use it in his stove. The bottle caps he would pound out to make washers to repair the mud stucco on our adobe walls. He would pierce the bottle caps to nail up “lathe” as a wire mesh to help hold the mud in place——his lathe he got from the cerveceria just a few blocks down—basically the metal sheets they cut bottle caps out of and barely holding together.

So here was Gatito repairing some stucco one day with his radio blasting. Now Gatito might have all of feet tall but more like 4’8”, wiry and tan like a saddle bag. He would mix up the mud stucco mix in a wheelbarrow and get it close to the wall where he was working. He’d start on the high parts and work his way down by simply placing a board on top of the wheel barrow so he could reach and as well he had his mix right at his feet. So Gatito is singing along with the radio and then I didn’t hear him for a bit so I went to check on him. I found him face up in the wheelbarrow and barely breathing. His pulse was barely there, it was obvious he needed a doctor and a hospital. I ran out to the street to a deli across the street to use the phone but realized on the sidewalk it was rush hour going into to lunch and those oneway streets were packed with cars, trucks, buses and collectivos———an ambulance was not going to make it.

I ran back wondering what I was going to do——no one else around. Simply I would have to take him myself but without a car (not that it would have mattered) I pondered carrying him and finding a Carabinero to requisition a taxi or collectivo. Gatito was really pale now and frothing at the mouth——but I had the wheel barrow. I took off to the hospital with gatito in the wheel barrow the 20 odd blocks to the hospital. Weaving in between traffic and pedestrians we made and I got him into emergency. Gatito came around a little on the way waving his arms around, moaning for people to get out of the way. He was still alive and the doctors and nurses immediately plucking him out of his stucco mix and into the ER.

Gatito had no family——probably long dead all of them——we were it so we went to visit the next day and found it was type of a heart issue. In good spirits he had his color back and was giggling in between his words and sentences——a good sign. Doctors sent him home and we brought food to him but he was back at work on the same wall 5 days later. He finished it.

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fraggle092
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Location: In Chile

Re: Where Should I Start?

Post by fraggle092 » Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:05 am

Sr. El Puelche wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:54 pm
..A typical Spanish city in the Americas was a hundred meters by a hundred meters with streets in between. The adobe homes were continuous with just a shared adobe wall in between separating families. Typically in the middle of the block on all sides was an open carriage way...
Serena was laid out in the 1500s by the Spanish in a typical rectangular grid. Unfortunately, they weren't very good at surveying, so there isn't a square block in the whole town, they are all skewed to form quadrilateral polygons. Inside the blocks, the houses were built to conform to the perimeter. The result is that those old houses don't have two walls at right angles to one other, (neither external nor internal ones). Mentioned here.
The old measurement, still used colloquially defining a block length was the cuadra, around 125 metres.

The old town centre still conforms to this map dated 1713, although most of the construction from that era is long gone. Adobe construction doesn't withstand earthquakes, fires, termites or even rain very well.
.
Planche_XIX.jpg
This map, being French, was scaled in Toises. Who thought that life was simpler back then....
Also, the Latitude is displayed, but not the Longitude. That's because at that time, they had no way to determine it.
Bienvenidos a Chaqueteo City.

Après moi, le déluge

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