Philanthropy Starting In Chile

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by admin » Wed Dec 26, 2018 12:54 pm

You know my first thought about this thread was, 'let them be, someone will take their money'.

Then I realized it was me.

On behalf of the shareholders of Sodimac, I thank you for your donation.

:lol:

Just in case you are not able to reinvent the wheel (or the house), you might want to do some homework about Chile.

These nice people actually have a well known track record. I have actually seen them building houses, every place you listed and beyond. We use to coordinate logistics together after the 2010 earthquake. They are fast, efficient, and know how to get things done.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TECHO

and guess what?

It is a Chilean organization, now building houses all over latin america.

My advice. Send those nice people a check. They will know what to do with it.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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tiagoabner
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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by tiagoabner » Wed Dec 26, 2018 5:15 pm

Britkid wrote:
Mon Dec 24, 2018 1:32 pm
It's a commendable attitude to want to help others. Good for you.

One thing I would like to say is that Chile is not that poor a country and therefore the community and the government will already be able to take care of themselves to a large extent.

So if you want to spend a few thousand dollars to improve the life of a poor Chilean you might say give them a new roof and now they have better insulation and don't have a leaky roof. But if you spend the same few thousand dollars in sub-saharan African on malarial bednets, you might save a person's life. If you spend a few thousand dollars on handing out medications in a very poor country, you might greatly reduce the suffering a person has.

In Chile, it's going to be much harder to find examples of where you can save a life or massively improve a person's life for a few thousand dollars. Most such opportunities will already have been taken care of by the government, family members, or communities.

I do give money to local charities, but I give the majority of my modest donations to the most effective (known) global ones.

https://www.givewell.org/charities/top-charities

Of course, any charity donations are commendable.

If you're rich, and especially if you are very rich, it may be more helpful to give money than time.
Assuming OP isn't trolling, this is the correct answer. Sure to how diminishing returns work, you're better off donating to a poorer country in order to get the most benefit for your buck.

Chile is arguably the most solid country in Latin America and Chileans have lots of "bonos' to back them up in case things go bad.
I'm NOT your lawyer, accountant or financial planner. All information at this post should be considered for your entertainment only. Consult a professional before making a decision regarding whatever topic was mentioned in this post.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by mem » Thu Dec 27, 2018 11:02 am

Questionsasked - I am just curious why you are targeting chile? Is it because you happened to have visited Chile? Is that the only reason?
If you had visited Ecuador or Paraguay would you be targeting those countries for philanthropy?

You do realize Chile is the richest nation per capita in South America right?

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by questionsasked » Thu Dec 27, 2018 8:50 pm

admin wrote:
Wed Dec 26, 2018 12:54 pm
You know my first thought about this thread was, 'let them be, someone will take their money'.

Then I realized it was me.

On behalf of the shareholders of Sodimac, I thank you for your donation.

:lol:

Just in case you are not able to reinvent the wheel (or the house), you might want to do some homework about Chile.

These nice people actually have a well known track record. I have actually seen them building houses, every place you listed and beyond. We use to coordinate logistics together after the 2010 earthquake. They are fast, efficient, and know how to get things done.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TECHO

and guess what?

It is a Chilean organization, now building houses all over latin america.

My advice. Send those nice people a check. They will know what to do with it.
TECHO looks good. Thanks for the information. I appreciate it.

questionsasked
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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by questionsasked » Thu Dec 27, 2018 10:13 pm

I just looked into TECHO and found this written about it on the internet:


--------------------------

Hi Diego:

I am interested in what Techo is doing, but I have issues with your approach.  Why would wealthier Americans think that by spending a couple of days with a family in an underdeveloped part of the world -- that they would be significantly helping that family?

Techo is building shacks and calling them homes.  I find that very offensive.  Why?  Because when a volunteer group spends $50,000 USD on getting to the underdeveloped location for home building -- the family that receives the shack building services doesn't get that money at all.  

Instead, tell the volunteers from Akron, Ohio to stay home and be a part of a Techo building team and they can DONATE the money they would have spent on GOING to a Techo site -- to build a house 5 times better than the shacks that you are throwing up in various countries.

To stand up for people living in poverty, you have to give them more than just particle board homes and wealthy volunteers who pat themselves on their backs for building a crappy dwelling for some poverty-stricken people in a foreign country.

Techo could and should do better.

- Alexis Rodriguez, Los Angeles

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by Julito » Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:07 am

Interesting thread, philanthopy "starting" in Chile.

It's been happening in Chile for years and being done by Chileans. For example my stepson for the last 3 plus years has worked for a group of philanthropic Santiago architects who fund parks, playgrounds and community gardens in poor areas in the South including an effective scheme for ongoing funding from local corporate sponsers. The communities are thus provided with local support to further develop what they've been provided.

One recent project the tentative corporate sponsor decided to fund the entire deal.

As to people being "too poor" to patch a hole in the roof, have a decent chimney or insulation, they can invariably afford to feed 2 or more dogs. It's a simple matter of priorities as they see them. Culture....

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by nwdiver » Fri Dec 28, 2018 3:00 am

50k to get there? What's that 10 first class tickets......I don't get it, the review is flawed so why put it up?
It's all about the wine.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by admin » Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:15 am

well first, that is not how techos primarily works. most of their money is localy sourced from chileans and chilean companies. most the labor is local volunteers (mostly highschool and university students, local community members, etc). they build low cost emergency type houses, and they also build entire perment communitiies in track home fashion. think i also seen them building apartment buildings a few years ago in urban areas. it is literally about getting a roof over people's head first.

that said, bringing potential donors to spend some time seeing what an organization does is a very tried and true method of raising funds. they come to latin america, smash their fingers with hammer for week or two, go home, send more money, tell their friends. yea, typicaly not very productive as far as directly building houses, but made up for in confidence among donors that their money is going somewhere usefull.

i always loved an answer that jimmy carter gave in an interview about habitat for humanity. he was asked if he was concerned about amitures building houses. he said, "where a professional might put in one nail, we put in two".

but your missing the point. what would cost a foriegner just arriving millions of dollars to stand-up an effective organization to do something from scratch, and probably not be very effective in the end, the local organizations already have the infrastructure to put the money to work.

more importantly, do no harm.

do you know how the goverment subsidized housing and social services point system works?

because if you don't, you can cause people to loose their benfits. worse the people you are trying to "help" could be charged with fraud (they regularly prosecute people for housing subsidy fraud)?

do you know that most activities that a 501c(3) in the united states is allowed to do (e.g. own and operate for profit buisnesses), is actualy a criminal offence in chile?

do you know about the audits for none-profits? you make one mistake and you are wrong side of the tax authority and money laundering laws.

I was on the board of directors of a u.s. 501(c)3 in the u.s. many years ago. one of our members set it up over the phone with the u.s. IRS in an hour.

In chile your looking at about $50,000 u.s. and 6 months to a year, at a minum. that is just sufficient paperwork to get you in a lot of trouble. there are strictly enforced rules and regulations about the type of activities, sotrce of funds, yearly audits, and much more.

why?

because in the united states ( especially), and much of the world, historically, NGO's have been little more than tax evasion, money laundering, and just outright scams (e.g. Trump foundation, american red cross).

chile does not play that game.

why?

Do you see the neighborhood we are in?

i am sure the Pablo Escobar family foundation would love to help you fix some roofs in chile. i am also sure their are many "family" foundations out of places like Panama and Uruguay that would also help. Are you prepared to drop a million dollars a year just vetting sources of donations?

it is not an accident that Douglas Tompkins, after all his years in chile, and the millions of dollars he invested in his enviromental project, still mostly used private corporations.

so, think long and hard about how much it costs to put a nail in a roof in chile first.

If you are still asking what a temporary RUT number is good for, your not even remotely in the game. so go fix a hole in a roof in the united states. for everyone's sake. otherwise you are just a tourist draining resources and doing more damage than good.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by admin » Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:29 am

oh, almost forgot.

forget speaking Spanish. as an american, trying to bring a bunch of donated american money, you better get fluent in FATCA first.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foreign ... liance_Act


https://www.irs.gov/businesses/corporat ... -act-fatca

i am very sure the u.s. irs is wize to using none profits to off shore and hide money.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:04 am

There are two ways to be fooled.

One is to believe what isn't true;

the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by questionsasked » Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:50 am

Julito wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 12:07 am
Interesting thread, philanthopy "starting" in Chile.

It's been happening in Chile for years and being done by Chileans. For example my stepson for the last 3 plus years has worked for a group of philanthropic Santiago architects who fund parks, playgrounds and community gardens in poor areas in the South including an effective scheme for ongoing funding from local corporate sponsers. The communities are thus provided with local support to further develop what they've been provided.

One recent project the tentative corporate sponsor decided to fund the entire deal.

As to people being "too poor" to patch a hole in the roof, have a decent chimney or insulation, they can invariably afford to feed 2 or more dogs. It's a simple matter of priorities as they see them. Culture....
good point, thanks for the information.

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Re: Philanthropy Starting In Chile

Post by questionsasked » Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:54 am

admin wrote:
Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:15 am
well first, that is not how techos primarily works. most of their money is localy sourced from chileans and chilean companies. most the labor is local volunteers (mostly highschool and university students, local community members, etc). they build low cost emergency type houses, and they also build entire perment communitiies in track home fashion. think i also seen them building apartment buildings a few years ago in urban areas. it is literally about getting a roof over people's head first.

that said, bringing potential donors to spend some time seeing what an organization does is a very tried and true method of raising funds. they come to latin america, smash their fingers with hammer for week or two, go home, send more money, tell their friends. yea, typicaly not very productive as far as directly building houses, but made up for in confidence among donors that their money is going somewhere usefull.

i always loved an answer that jimmy carter gave in an interview about habitat for humanity. he was asked if he was concerned about amitures building houses. he said, "where a professional might put in one nail, we put in two".

but your missing the point. what would cost a foriegner just arriving millions of dollars to stand-up an effective organization to do something from scratch, and probably not be very effective in the end, the local organizations already have the infrastructure to put the money to work.

more importantly, do no harm.

do you know how the goverment subsidized housing and social services point system works?

because if you don't, you can cause people to loose their benfits. worse the people you are trying to "help" could be charged with fraud (they regularly prosecute people for housing subsidy fraud)?

do you know that most activities that a 501c(3) in the united states is allowed to do (e.g. own and operate for profit buisnesses), is actualy a criminal offence in chile?

do you know about the audits for none-profits? you make one mistake and you are wrong side of the tax authority and money laundering laws.

I was on the board of directors of a u.s. 501(c)3 in the u.s. many years ago. one of our members set it up over the phone with the u.s. IRS in an hour.

In chile your looking at about $50,000 u.s. and 6 months to a year, at a minum. that is just sufficient paperwork to get you in a lot of trouble. there are strictly enforced rules and regulations about the type of activities, sotrce of funds, yearly audits, and much more.

why?

because in the united states ( especially), and much of the world, historically, NGO's have been little more than tax evasion, money laundering, and just outright scams (e.g. Trump foundation, american red cross).

chile does not play that game.

why?

Do you see the neighborhood we are in?

i am sure the Pablo Escobar family foundation would love to help you fix some roofs in chile. i am also sure their are many "family" foundations out of places like Panama and Uruguay that would also help. Are you prepared to drop a million dollars a year just vetting sources of donations?

it is not an accident that Douglas Tompkins, after all his years in chile, and the millions of dollars he invested in his enviromental project, still mostly used private corporations.

so, think long and hard about how much it costs to put a nail in a roof in chile first.

If you are still asking what a temporary RUT number is good for, your not even remotely in the game. so go fix a hole in a roof in the united states. for everyone's sake. otherwise you are just a tourist draining resources and doing more damage than good.
Are you always such a negative person? I came onto the forum asking how to set up a legal entity to do philanthropy work in Chile.

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