TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

In Chile, when the old, crazy, and infirm are institutionalized and set out in a wheelchair on the patio to drool all over each other they are referred to as “locos de patio”. This is where we keep our locos de patio on the All Chile Forum.

Registration required to read, 200 posts and 1 year to post in this forum. A work in progress.
Forum rules
Only members with 200 posts and 1 year on the forum are allowed to post. Must register to read. Work in progress.
Post Reply
User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 15868
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by admin » Mon Jun 20, 2011 2:47 pm

This one is just strange.

O.k., so my wife and I are watching TVN morning show this morning. They are talking about this investigative report that TVN news did about the rumored gringos building a bunker in a rural part of the 5th region.

The story, as I understand it, is that some locals started gossiping about these gringos that had bought a property and were building a house with a bunker for the end of the world in 2012. Which, really in the context of some of the foreigners that are attracted to Chile, not all that surprising ( perhaps one for the you know you have have been in Chile too long thread), if it was true.

So I guess local media picked up the rumor, and then the tabloids, and so on. Well TVN, finally decided to investigate to see if the rumors were true.

They said it started because at some point the owner had a conversation with some locals about 2012 or whatever. Which may or may not be true.

So they finally tracked down the owner, and the poor lady relented and gave a limited tour of the property.

They are just building a really big house, and bringing in outside labor on buses. It was way beyond what a local maestro could build, and looked like they hired a big construction company. They were also starting some sort of organic farm and whatever.

On the one hand I thought I would be really pissed, needing to give a tour of a new house so all the little ladrones could see first hand where to rob. Beyond the privacy issues. On the other hand, Chile is a little paranoid about strange foreign compounds after some of the really weird cases involving the German nazi compounds.

I guess the moral to that story is don't let the locals imaginations run away on their own. Better to at least give them something to gossip about. Never under estimate the campo grapevine in Chile.

Funny thing is, we have heard all kinds of strange rumors like this across Chile from locals gossiping about various gringos building mysterious things in the woods, on a mountain, or whatever.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
eeuunikkeiexpat
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 7093
Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:38 am
Location: Megalith of unknown origin near my digs, south V Region coast

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:11 pm

I saw it the same time you did.

Near Olmue.
Generally, just a SPAM KILLER. You are on your own in this forum. My personal mission here is done.

BUT when necessary, by way of ridicule and truth revelation we shalt do war.

--eeuunikkeiexpat

User avatar
gato
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:40 pm
Location: IX Región de la Araucanía

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by gato » Mon Jun 20, 2011 4:42 pm

During one of my walks in the Cochiguaz valley back in 2008, I noted a couple of buildings, not to say that they were really "mysterious" buildings, yet -- their shape and location was a bit unusual. Though such "unusual" construction should be rather "usual" there.

Also, had a couple of talks with locals about "communities" awaiting certain events like the "end of the world". Still -- again in the Valley, where such craziness is (or was) common.

Those seeking to build some kind of structure noted in the OP should simply go there -- then this would not attract much attention. IMO.
The time that you spend reading this sentence could be employed to better advantage in almost any other way.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 15868
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by admin » Mon Jun 20, 2011 5:57 pm

We know a bunch of people that are in the country, particularly in remote parts of Chile, that are here for "hedging" their bets. My guess, just from the conversations with foreigners and their plans I have had over the years, there is likely something better than 10,000 - 20,000 foreigners in Chile on that Chile travel plan. Some are here for religious, some for political, some for financial reasons, some for environmental reasons, or whatever. What they all share in common is some sort of belief that the other part of the World is a mess in the making in a catastrophic sense of mess (perhaps to varying degrees, but catastrophic).

You don't need to necessarily believe in some sort of divine end of the World or have a tin foil hat, to believe the something bad could happen or is going to happen. The incredibly fragile nature of our modern society is pretty much a historical fact, and denying that fact would run somewhere between pure ignorance to outright delusion. Especially now that over half of the World's population lives in urban areas.

Anyone here recall the earthquake? I sure recall spending a few days in the dark without internet. So I bought a generator at sodimac when I had the chance this year ( I seem to use it more because my electric company sucks, than natural disasters). I bought some wireless dongles for internet (again, ISP sucks, not disaster). Lesson learned.

The pump to the community well where I live went out a few weeks ago for lack of proper maintaining, with very little idea of when it would be fixed (turns out two weeks). That was a gentle reminder for me not to get too comfortable again, but I was lucky that I could fix the problem with a backup water system I bought at sodimac. There might not be a sodimac. The lights, and everything else could very well go out, and stay out. People buy life, fire, health, car insurance, but not a generator, radio, keep some extra gas around. Sometimes your insurance will not cover exactly what you need it to, when you need it.

Hell, I bet you half the people that read this forum or people considering Chile at all, believe it in some form even if they will not admit it in public for fear of being boxed up with the tin foil hat crowd.

The real question is just how loony are you? Is it directly proportional to the real worst case scenario or just a likely case scenerio? Are you keeping some flashlights around on one end of "prepared" or are you building a bunker in your backyard on the other end of "prepared". Are you selling everything and moving to a mountain top in Chile?

What I find particularly disturbing, is the powers that be, even in emergency management circles, like to say you only need a radio, a first aid kit, a little bit of food and water on hand, and so on. Which is a good idea, but what they won't ever breach is the subject of how much is too much. They really don't like anyone to disturb the piece or panic people by advocating being too prepared. Too prepared in a New Orleans sort of prepared.

My mother's side of the family was Mormon (I like wine, not really much of a Mormon), but say what you will about the Mormon church (and I got a lot to say about it), they are the only ones I have ever heard tell people to keep at least a year supply of food or water on hand. I have always kept about 2-3 month supply of food on hand. The idea being it will take that long for them to get their factories and farms up and running to support their members world wide. What would everyone else do if say even something as ho hum as a trucker's strike shutdown food and fuel deliveries for 3-6 months? What about something that shuts down oil flow from the middle east for a couple of years, and oil goes to $500 a barrel around the World? What about a volcano blowing up (sorry, seems that is not as bad as it sounds)?

There is a point at which things break in our modern society, and they do not go back together ever or at least for a very long time. The WWII generation, that is now slowly dying out, seemed to always keep that in mind.

Do I feel a need to build a bunker in the back yard? Not really. An independent water supply for my house, definitely. An independent energy source, definitely. Besides, independence, it also tends to follow being ecologically sound and financially cheaper. Energy in Chile is expensive, will likely stay that way, and sometimes it is the only way to solve certain practical problems in rural areas.

I am also fairly confident in my survival skills (I have been living in the developing world for over half my life now), both short and long-term. So, there is a point where I think it would be just waisting resources. Generally I consider most of the precautions I do take to be more a matter of just how comfortable do I want to be and for how long sort of thing. When the power is knocked out at our house, we like to watch movies off the generator and generally go about our daily biz for instance.

I also kind of like the intellectual challenge of solving both ecological and reliability problems on more of a hobby geeky level. If I was ever inclined to build a bunker, it would be more of geeky experiment than I really think I am going to need a bunker. Generally by the time you might need one of them, everyone is pretty screwed anyway ( take Europe, WWII ).
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
gato
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 352
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2011 1:40 pm
Location: IX Región de la Araucanía

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by gato » Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:38 pm

You talk of "the incredibly fragile nature" of our modern society and I observe "the incredibly fragile nature" of the very nature, day-by-day, and everything else BTW, every single thing. In 2012 or not, "catastrophic" or not, sudden or gradual -- in any case it seems that all is unavoidably going to where it does, and those who have the eyes to see -- they don't need "some sort of belief", for they simply have to keep the eyes open. That's all. Some things, like a generator bought at sodimac, or a wireless dongles -- they could be of not much use, then. Really.

:alien: { = NIA, DYODD }
The time that you spend reading this sentence could be employed to better advantage in almost any other way.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 15868
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by admin » Mon Jun 20, 2011 10:57 pm

Yea, I know that. If it all comes to and end, I won't need a generator or a wireless dongle.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

john
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 6130
Joined: Sun Oct 19, 2008 1:11 am
Location: Viña del Mar, Chile

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by john » Tue Jun 21, 2011 5:59 am

That's really strange! Last November I was visiting with my friend Jaime in Olmue and he asked me if I would like to accompany him on a visit to see a lady gringa (Jaime owns a dog training business that trains two of her dogs) who is building a huge house in the hills above Olmue. Being naturally curious, I said yes but when we got there she was not at home (apparently she was renting an adjacent house, which Jaime told me is owned by a Senator, while her mansion was being built). At that time, only the outer framework of the structure was completed (it was huge) but it looked more like a warehouse than a house. But, the location of her property is really beautiful and her land cascades from the house down into a lush valley ... Jaime said she told him that she was going into the organic farming business. The funny thing is that I have been invited to visit with her (invitation conveyed via Jaime) when I return to Chile and I'm really looking forward to it. 8)
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 15868
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by admin » Tue Jun 21, 2011 10:19 pm

Yea, I did not want to publish the poor womans name, even though it was in the report. I suspected someone here likely knew who it was (small country after all).

Never under estimate the power of the campo rumors. Sometimes they turn out to be true, or at least there is some sort of grain of truth that kicks them off. We use it when conducting title searches for clients to find if there are any problems that are hidden.

One of the more interesting rumors we caught wind of several years ago was that one of our client's properties was really owned by Douglas Tompkins, and that he was kicking out all the residents to add to his park. Well, after digging, just to be sure, we find out he really does own the property next door but through a foundation, and there was a small 5 meter overlap to our client's property. Douglas Tompkins would have gone bankrupt years ago if he fought every little property line dispute. They have a policy of simply signing over any rights to something that small to the person, rather than waisting time, money, and bad local politics fighting with all the guys in the campo. A meeting with one of his attorneys, and it was resolved.

On the flip side, I had a similar experience with the campo rumors last month and my own property. Caretaker of neighbors property stopped by my property while I was working to introduce himself. In the course of the conversation he tells me that the abandoned house that is blocking my view is being foreclosed on and that both the old ladies that own it are dead. So no one was paying the bank. Well, after digging around a bit, we finally track down the owner. Of course it is just fine, the owner is alive and kicking, it is not in foreclosure, and owner has no real interest in selling.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
otravers
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1210
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2007 9:48 am
Location: Concón, Region V

Re: TVN report, the campo, and the Gringo 2012 bunker

Post by otravers » Fri Jun 24, 2011 5:06 pm

Now featured in today's Mercurio (Santiasco edition).

Post Reply