Post your Pet Photos

Forum related to everything not related to our not so human friends, including importing animals, buying animals, pets, veterinarians in Chile, animal rescue causes, and anything else related to animals in Chile.
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greg~judy
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by greg~judy » Wed Feb 24, 2010 3:27 pm

Good one, Rune... I'm quite envious!!!
Maybe she could be a Brachypelma
That's a kind of tarantula - a genus of tropical new-world species.
These are generally considered docile
A good starter species by those who keep tarantulas as pets.
First, give her a name...
Yes... it's a she - these exhibit sexual dimorphism
SHE is BIG, he is small
Prepare a nice terrarium inside your house
Make it "homey" for a spider
Get something (a net, or box) to transfer her
Be gentle... remember she is your friend
Introduce her to her new home
Find lots of live bugs, flies, crawlers to feed her...
If she gets bigger, she may like a small mouse?
Have fun with your new pet
She can live about 20 years :!:
BTW... I have never had a tarantula :(
But I've always wanted one
You are very fortunate, Rune :D
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

oregon woodsmoke
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by oregon woodsmoke » Sun Feb 28, 2010 7:47 pm

[[[....can we ALL respect life in all its forms?...]]]]

Respect has to be earned and respect goes both ways.

Live and let live unless they bite me, steal my food, give disease to me or mine, destroy my property.

The mouse is welcome to live in the rockpile, and I won't bother him. But if he comes into my house and chews my electrical wiring and poops in my food, he's made the decision to shorten his own life rather abruptly.

The wolf spider can live in my house, the black widow can not. The grass snake can live under my shed, the rattlesnake can not. If the rattlesnake lives out on the cliffs, I will leave him alone. If he decides to invade my territory, he has made a bad decision because he threatens the life of my dogs.

Just my opinion, but I don't think it shows much respect to the wildlife to shut them into a terrarium or birdcage.

I let them make their own decisions. Sometimes they make bad decisions and it costs them their lives. Mother Nature set her system up that way.

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RuneTheChookcha
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by RuneTheChookcha » Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:06 pm

"Where's the water???.."

Image

This guy was also wondering.. The picture was taken around 8:30 AM on Feb-27 (that very morning after the earthquake)..

:alien:

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janni
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by janni » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:57 am

Meuh.jpg
Meuh...
Meuh.jpg (36.12 KiB) Viewed 1334 times

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greg~judy
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by greg~judy » Wed Mar 31, 2010 2:12 pm

Looking for a TOAD pet in Chile... please help me :roll:
British study says toads fled breeding site days before deadly Italian quake

LONDON - Scientists may have an ally in the struggle to predict deadly earthquakes - bufo bufo, the common toad.

British researchers said Wednesday that they observed a mass exodus of toads from a breeding site in Italy five days before a major tremor struck, suggesting the amphibians may be able to sense environmental changes, imperceptible to humans, that foretell a coming quake.

Researchers from the Open University were studying toads in central Italy when they noticed a sharp decline in the number of animals at the site. Days later, a 6.3-magnitude earthquake hit, killing hundreds of people and badly damaging the town of L'Aquila.

Researcher Rachel Grant said the findings suggested "that toads are able to detect pre-seismic cues such as the release of gases and charged particles, and use these as a form of earthquake early-warning system."

Since ancient times, anecdotes and folklore have linked unusual animal behaviour to cataclysmic events like earthquakes, but hard evidence has been scarce.

Several countries including China have sought to use changes in nature - mostly animal behaviour - as an early-warning sign, without much success.

The city of Tokyo spent years in the 1990s researching whether catfish behaviour could be used to predict earthquakes, but abandoned the study as inconclusive.

Initially puzzled by the toads' disappearance in the middle of the breeding season, the British scientists tracked the population in the days that followed the Italian quake. They found that 96 per cent of males - who vastly outnumber females at breeding spots - abandoned the site, 74 kilometres from the quake's epicentre, five days before it struck on April 6, 2009.

The number of toads at the site fell to zero three days before the quake, according to the study, published in the Zoological Society of London's Journal of Zoology.

"A day after the earthquake, they all started coming back," said Grant, the report's lead author. "The numbers were still lower than normal and remained low until after the last aftershock."

She said one possibility is that the animals sensed a change in the amount of radon gas emitted by the Earth because of the buildup of pressure prior to a quake.

Scientists also have surmised that animals may be able to detect minor tremors imperceptible to humans, or that they sense electrical signals emitted by rocks under stress before an earthquake.

Grant said the sense may be the result of millions of years of evolution, a trigger that tells the toads to move to safer ground.

"An earthquake could wipe out a population in that area," she said. "A landslide or flood could wipe out virtually 100 per cent of the males, and quite a lot of the females."

Roger Musson, a seismologist with the British Geological Survey, said the problem studies like the Italian toad research lay in proving the connection between the animal behaviour and the quake.

"What happens is somebody observes some strange animal behaviour then there is an earthquake, so they link the two," said Musson. "There are probably plenty of cases in which there is strange animal behaviour and no earthquake."

He said the new study was "another bit of data in the large pile that has been accumulating over the years. But it's not in any shape or form a breakthrough."
KL4` 002 sm.jpg
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Here is my former (Thai) toad family
A happy mom (Tessie) and her 2 babies
Very friendly and playful

Now I am living in Chile,
I think a few tremor~toads
might be a welcome addition to our new home :!:

Please - if any allchileans know...
Where are there some nice toads...
I am willing to trade beers for toads :wink:
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

chilechinadollz
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by chilechinadollz » Thu Apr 01, 2010 12:30 am

BTW... a disclosure...in a former life I was a zoologist and biology teacher...
Since you mentioned your science training. And seeing Rune's spider photos made me think of a question. In region 10 I saw a really big spider in the field that looked like a tarantula. One of the local women told me to watch out for what sounded like "missulena". I looked this up and found a spider tagged as "missulena tussulena" but it states that it lives in Region IV. I've looked up information on the brown recluse, but couldn't find that much on this guy. Do you have any Region X spider wisom to impart? If so I'd love to learn more. Thanks

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Thu Apr 01, 2010 1:04 am

There are two ways to be fooled. One is to believe what isn't true;

the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

- Søren Kierkegaard

chilechinadollz
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by chilechinadollz » Thu Apr 01, 2010 12:31 pm

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:The araña rincon IS NOT A PET!

http://www.allchile.net/chileforum/topi ... tml#p12344
Yes of course, thanks. :wink: And thanks for the link, nasty nasty looking bite there. :( I found in my travels a product that treats spider bite (not that one shouldn't go to a hosptital) and has spider traps as well. I plan to bring some of the stuff down with me next trip to put into my first aid supplies. http://www.brown-recluse.com/spiderinfo.html

Note for others from elsewhere:It's called Araña Tigre, or Tiger Spider, it's harmless to humans. But it is the principle predator of the Araña de Rincón (Loxosceles laeta), or Chilean Recluse. Here's a picture of the Araña de Rincón: http://c.hileno.com/2008/04/tiger-spide ... cluse.html

Definately not my choice of a pet, only a preferred pet good for witches I suppose.... well back to puppies and kittens

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thingit
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by thingit » Thu Apr 01, 2010 2:45 pm

Looking at photos I'm now realizing that that 'small spider' (small in comparison to the hunstmen I used to deal with back home) I found scurrying under a pile of bags in my room last week was probably a araña rincon. Oh well, to far in the past to get scared over it and I'm still alive now so either he's moved on or he doesn't fancy nibbling on me while I'm sleeping.

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greg~judy
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by greg~judy » Mon May 24, 2010 4:43 pm

Time to bump...
Now that g~j are a bit less nomadic... yes, we can now think about a pet.
Here we are, on the edge of the Atacama... so we are thinking of this one...
Maybe two... a male and female, of course :wink:
Isn't he handsome... :D
Grammostola_rosea_adult ac.jpg
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The Chilean rose tarantula (Grammostola rosea), also known as the Chilean flame tarantula, Chilean fire tarantula or the Chilean red-haired tarantula or the Chilean rose hair tarantula (depending on the colormorph), is probably the most common species of tarantula available in pet stores today, due to the large number of wild caught specimens exported cheaply from their native Chile into the US pet trade. G. rosea originates from the northern Atacama Desert region of Chile and live in the driest deserts on earth. G. rosea is a common pet of tarantula rearers. Females have been known to live as long as 15-20 years but due to the limited time they have been available on the market and hence for extensive study, there is a possibility that they may live considerably longer.

The G. rosea's natural habitat is the desert and scrub regions of Chile, Bolivia, and Argentina. They do not burrow in their native habitat although they like to live in dry regions. They are usually active in the evening or night.

The diet of a tarantula is typically crickets, grass-hoppers, locusts, moths, mealworms, and cockroaches. It is best to gut-load crickets by providing high-quality greens and vegetables before feeding them to the tarantula. Gut-loaded crickets are better hydrated and provide more nutritive value. Typically these pets should be fed once a week feeding with one or more of the insects stated above, it is not uncommon for a G. rosea to go without food for many weeks, or even months, at a time. However this should not cause concern unless the tarantula appears thin or dehydrated. Food must usually be fed live as dead prey may be rejected or go unnoticed.

The Grammostola Rosea has been bred in captivity for years either for research purposes or for trade ...
g~j left the part about spider sex out... children could be reading :?
... once fertilized, the female will produce a large egg sac (usually containing around 500 spiderlings) in the following weeks as the male will ultimately die off. :(

G. rosea are relatively docile, low maintenance, and inexpensive, so they are popular as pets. G. rosea can be kept in a low-humidity terrarium at least twice the spiders' legspan in length, with a retreat for hiding. They are quite happy living at room temperatures of around 20-30°C, with a diet of four to six crickets every three weeks (or one locust per week). The G. rosea's feeding schedule is rather erratic, however; the spider can fast for weeks to months at a time. Fasting is sometimes an indication of an upcoming moult.

G. rosea are usually skittish, running away from danger rather than acting defensively, but they may also raise their front legs and present their fangs in preparation to defend themselves. They can act especially defensive for days after moulting; this may be innate in the spiders behavior. As with the majority of tarantulas from the Americas (New World tarantulas), they have small spine-like urticating hairs on their abdomen that they kick off or release when threatened as a defense.
Rune... do you still have that cool tarantula in your yard?
Has she had any spiderlings?
If so, you are SO lucky :)
g~j will start looking around here... surely they can't export all these?
We wonder if allchileans knew about this Chilean export?
Only one future problem... since they live so long...what if g~j want to fly somewhere and take their pets :shock:
Do they let tarantulas on planes... (they let snakes on - we saw the movie)?
But first...
g~j must start searching around "the desert and scrub regions of Chile" in XV region.
We will report back at regular intervals :alien:
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

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RuneTheChookcha
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by RuneTheChookcha » Mon May 24, 2010 9:57 pm

Who knows? I don't like to visit that place. What if it wants to bite me?

I had one more in Vicuña (back in 2008), and it was constantly drunk.

Image

But now please tell me, when will this RAIN stop?.. :)

And, you know, I cannot spell this.. "vis-sic-ssi-tudes of life".. "visci-issi-tudes".. "viss-ciss-itudes".. hey, how do you spell this?..

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greg~judy
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Re: Post your Pet Photos

Post by greg~judy » Mon May 24, 2010 11:37 pm

But now please tell me, when will this RAIN stop?.. :)
And, you know, I cannot spell this.. "vis-sic-ssi-tudes of life".. "visci-issi-tudes".. "viss-ciss-itudes".. hey, how do you spell this?..
vicissitude (plural vicissitudes)
1. Regular change or succession from one thing to another, or one part of a cycle to the next; alternation; mutual succession; interchange.
2. (often plural) a change, especially in one's life or fortunes.
RAIN is a vicissitude, Rune...
But, not one that g~j know - here in XV region. :D
Sounds like you have (had) much to ponder there. :(
We ponder other things here... like (on topic) where will we find tarantulas for pets :?
Where can we find some babies spiderlings - like this one... cute, eh?
spiderling ac.jpg
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Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

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