HELP!!! identify this snake

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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by admin » Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:53 pm

i know that even a dangerious snake like a cobra or a rattle snake is not dagerious if it is stretched out so it can not coil and strike.

so stepped on its tail to suprise it, while grabbing its head. if you step on a snakes tail, it tends to scare them so they stretch out (like trying to escape), rather than try to turn around and bite you. a bit counterintuitive for both for humans and snakes.
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by Donnybrook » Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:43 pm

St Patrick's Day on Sunday. Just saying.

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tiagoabner
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by tiagoabner » Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:47 pm

A herpetologist friend checked it for me and her guess is it's a "Tachymenis chilensis", or "cuebra de cola corta". Did it have black "stripes" right above it's eyes?

It's venomous, but the bite isn't deadly for humans. Per her, your lil buddy has no business in being in Frutillar, it was meant to live in warmer areas in central and northern Chile.

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hlf2888
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by hlf2888 » Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:25 pm

admin wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:04 pm
:lol: well that will train him to never come back to my property. you end up an internet celebrity without royalities.

:lol:
good for you admin, for setting the snake free. Here is my snake story

It was Mexico in the early 90's; before the cartel wars, before the beheadings and before tourists swarmed the interior of the Yucatan peninsula. In a small nondescript rental car, I left Merida early one hot sunny morning to drive east across the peninsula to Cancun. My mother was the copilot in charge of radio stations and translating signs with her small pocket dictionary. We would get the gist right but never the verb tense. After travelling a few hours on a treacherous, uneven double lane highway through little villages with topes and slow donkey carts, I saw a sign for a quota, a toll highway. I took the exit, paid the toll and drove on to a brand new four-lane divided highway. No more worrying about head-on collisions with oncoming cars or trucks passing in the oncoming lane and scaring the little Spanish I knew out of me.

What an exquisite road. The two lanes were empty and there was a fifty foot median with cactus and mesquite and dried up grasses ending at the two oncoming lanes. Where were all the other cars? I wondered, as I drove blissfully on this perfect, newly paved deserted highway. The hours passed; the sky was a cloudless blue with a benevolent sun beaming down its warmth, the golden landscape level as a pancake. Upbeat Mexican music sputtering with static, the wide grey ribbon of pavement shimmering its way to the flat line horizon.

After three uneventful hours I spotted something colorful in the middle of the road in the distance. It seemed to be a long scarf with a multi-color design. Getting closer I saw it was a snake lying on the pavement. I stopped the car on the side of the highway and went over to investigate; sad in my heart thinking it was dead. Its body was six feet long and as thick as a man's forearm. It had a beautiful, mottled almost leafy pattern with splashes and curlicues of gold and yellow on a greenish brown background. When I got to within ten feet of it, it suddenly curled its body into a spiral and lifting its anvil head, it hissed at me. I stumbled back in shock, in awe of its fearful magnificence. It had been sunbathing on the hot pavement and I had disturbed its reverie.

My philosophy has always been to keep my little corner of the world safe and that meant wherever in the world I was I had to protect whoever and whatever was on my path; a chronic hero syndrome as a result of having Mighty Mouse as a childhood role model. I knew if I left the snake there it would probably be killed. A quick analysis of the situation told me I needed to encourage the snake to the median as quickly as possible, as that was the direction its head was pointing in when I came across it. Without the clutter of circumspection, my mind raced merrily to a plan of action.

Mom got out of the car to watch for any traffic and I took a large suitcase with wheels out of the trunk of the car. It was three feet high by one and a half feet wide with a telescopic handle. Giving the strange serpent a wide berth I extended the handle and rolled the suitcase in front of me to form a barrier.

I slowly wheeled it closer to the snake who had unraveled and was stretched out again, basking on the hot pavement. I nudged its tail with the edge of the suitcase; it quickly coiled and hissed, regarding me with a cold golden reptilian eye. I told the snake I was only trying to help. It was somnolent with the sweltering sun and not in an argumentative mood; it just wanted to sleep. Like a teenager being awakened in the morning, the snake begrudgingly moved very slowly to the gentle nudges of the suitcase. Inch by inch, nudge by nudge we got closer to the median. And then it stopped and coiled, as if making a stand. I mini-stepped a bit closer and nudged it again. It slowly unraveled in a silent sinuous motion. An electric shiver started at its tail and rippled through its body to its head, propelling it forward a little closer to the median. I kept my body behind the suitcase to give myself and Mom the illusion of safety. Mom watched for cars; thankfully there were none.

This strange ballet between serpent and human continued until finally, in swaying rippling motility it slipped like a long green wave into the grass and undergrowth of the median. My serendipity encounter with the exotic creature was over. I felt relief, my world and those in it had stayed safe. I loaded the suitcase into the car and we drove on that straight grey ribbon to the horizon and Cancun.

Later in retrospect and research, I learned the snake might have been either a boa constrictor and their bite is not usually fatal or a viper which is very deadly. A six foot snake could have easily lunged over the three foot suitcase and bit the silly human. And had it been poisonous, I would have been too far from a hospital to survive the venom.

Gods sometimes smile down on idiots. Perhaps their constant surveillance of the daily doings on planet earth requires a bit of levity. The serpent and I each lived little longer and continued our foolish trajectories through life.

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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by HybridAmbassador » Sat Mar 16, 2019 1:44 pm

hlf2888 wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 10:25 pm
admin wrote:
Fri Mar 15, 2019 8:04 pm
:lol: well that will train him to never come back to my property. you end up an internet celebrity without royalities.

:lol:
good for you admin, for setting the snake free. Here is my snake story

It was Mexico in the early 90's; before the cartel wars, before the beheadings and before tourists swarmed the interior of the Yucatan peninsula. In a small nondescript rental car, I left Merida early one hot sunny morning to drive east across the peninsula to Cancun. My mother was the copilot in charge of radio stations and translating signs with her small pocket dictionary. We would get the gist right but never the verb tense. After travelling a few hours on a treacherous, uneven double lane highway through little villages with topes and slow donkey carts, I saw a sign for a quota, a toll highway. I took the exit, paid the toll and drove on to a brand new four-lane divided highway. No more worrying about head-on collisions with oncoming cars or trucks passing in the oncoming lane and scaring the little Spanish I knew out of me.

What an exquisite road. The two lanes were empty and there was a fifty foot median with cactus and mesquite and dried up grasses ending at the two oncoming lanes. Where were all the other cars? I wondered, as I drove blissfully on this perfect, newly paved deserted highway. The hours passed; the sky was a cloudless blue with a benevolent sun beaming down its warmth, the golden landscape level as a pancake. Upbeat Mexican music sputtering with static, the wide grey ribbon of pavement shimmering its way to the flat line horizon.

After three uneventful hours I spotted something colorful in the middle of the road in the distance. It seemed to be a long scarf with a multi-color design. Getting closer I saw it was a snake lying on the pavement. I stopped the car on the side of the highway and went over to investigate; sad in my heart thinking it was dead. Its body was six feet long and as thick as a man's forearm. It had a beautiful, mottled almost leafy pattern with splashes and curlicues of gold and yellow on a greenish brown background. When I got to within ten feet of it, it suddenly curled its body into a spiral and lifting its anvil head, it hissed at me. I stumbled back in shock, in awe of its fearful magnificence. It had been sunbathing on the hot pavement and I had disturbed its reverie.

My philosophy has always been to keep my little corner of the world safe and that meant wherever in the world I was I had to protect whoever and whatever was on my path; a chronic hero syndrome as a result of having Mighty Mouse as a childhood role model. I knew if I left the snake there it would probably be killed. A quick analysis of the situation told me I needed to encourage the snake to the median as quickly as possible, as that was the direction its head was pointing in when I came across it. Without the clutter of circumspection, my mind raced merrily to a plan of action.

Mom got out of the car to watch for any traffic and I took a large suitcase with wheels out of the trunk of the car. It was three feet high by one and a half feet wide with a telescopic handle. Giving the strange serpent a wide berth I extended the handle and rolled the suitcase in front of me to form a barrier.

I slowly wheeled it closer to the snake who had unraveled and was stretched out again, basking on the hot pavement. I nudged its tail with the edge of the suitcase; it quickly coiled and hissed, regarding me with a cold golden reptilian eye. I told the snake I was only trying to help. It was somnolent with the sweltering sun and not in an argumentative mood; it just wanted to sleep. Like a teenager being awakened in the morning, the snake begrudgingly moved very slowly to the gentle nudges of the suitcase. Inch by inch, nudge by nudge we got closer to the median. And then it stopped and coiled, as if making a stand. I mini-stepped a bit closer and nudged it again. It slowly unraveled in a silent sinuous motion. An electric shiver started at its tail and rippled through its body to its head, propelling it forward a little closer to the median. I kept my body behind the suitcase to give myself and Mom the illusion of safety. Mom watched for cars; thankfully there were none.

This strange ballet between serpent and human continued until finally, in swaying rippling motility it slipped like a long green wave into the grass and undergrowth of the median. My serendipity encounter with the exotic creature was over. I felt relief, my world and those in it had stayed safe. I loaded the suitcase into the car and we drove on that straight grey ribbon to the horizon and Cancun.

Later in retrospect and research, I learned the snake might have been either a boa constrictor and their bite is not usually fatal or a viper which is very deadly. A six foot snake could have easily lunged over the three foot suitcase and bit the silly human. And had it been poisonous, I would have been too far from a hospital to survive the venom.

Gods sometimes smile down on idiots. Perhaps their constant surveillance of the daily doings on planet earth requires a bit of levity. The serpent and I each lived little longer and continued our foolish trajectories through life.
LoL hlf2888-san, you are one kind human being! Due to your action, perhaps that serpent was spared life...I know for sure that your entrance to that paradise up in the heavens is assured, god bless you..
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by admin » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:52 am

few more shots for future reference:
1552682192984354.jpg
supposedly those black dots get more prominent as they get older, and at this size made it a bit harder to ID until i looked at very closely.
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by admin » Sun Mar 17, 2019 8:56 am

1552823734565733.jpg
1552823734565733.jpg (95.03 KiB) Viewed 90 times
1552823734428586.jpg
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by Gloria » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:11 am

Hummmm....looks like that type of snake likes to eat gringos for breakfast!
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by admin » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:12 am

a few of the references i found:
https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/28538- ... -chilensis

http://reptile-database.reptarium.cz/sp ... =chilensis

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachymenis

oh, and seems the peruvian version has been linked to fatal bites in humans. probably best not to try and grab any in northern chile, just in case it has a peruvian passport.

really, probably not a good idea to grab any snake.

in other words, don't try this at home. :lol: :lol:
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by admin » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:30 am

now that i think about it, i do recall seeing a snake while horse back riding years ago. it crossed the trail in front of me. i want to say it was in the cochamo valley, but might have been near Panguipulli. either way, it was pretty far south.

I guess the climate changes has more than just gringos and vineyards relocating farther south.

plenty of food around here. i suspect it is eating the small lizards we have all over the place, and there are no shortage of mice when they get bigger.

i also suspect it is a local refugee. two parcels up from my house, some friends just stripped all the top soil off a parcel with a backhoe in preparation for building. the lot had been ferro for 20+ years, and was a refuge for lots of local wildlife. foxes, rabbits, partridges, etc. kind of sad to see my local wild animals get dislocated, but there is still lots of untouched forest and scrub land just up the road.

this guy just took a wrong turn when evicted.
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Re: HELP!!! identify this snake

Post by 41southchile » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:32 am

Don't worry I definitely won't be trying to pick any up . Apparantly they can swim a friend if mine said, they used to find them all the time in the campo when they were kidd, (in the 70s) they lived near the lake and would throw them out and watch them swim back with their little heads above the water.
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