Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by admin » Sat Oct 30, 2010 6:30 pm

I just bought campbells tomato soup at Jumbo in Temuco, there was a whole shelf of different brands and types. I have also found clambchowders and others without too much of problem at lider. Lider, owned by wall mart, cans there soups in Argentina for U.S. export. Safeway brand is common also around.

I have found that they tend to be slow to restock down south, and it seems they do not send it any more south than stores in Temuco for the most part. Around Puerto Varas and Puerto Montt i have had trouble finding it.
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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sat Oct 30, 2010 6:35 pm

Gringo Pillo wrote:
cazzy123 wrote:No canned soup in any Santiago supermarkets. Is this a cultural thing? Cost? Safety?

I believe canned soup is sold in other Latin America countries.
Maybe is cultural thing and people like to eat soup made from fresh materials instead of heavily modified products which contain carcinogenics such as monosodium glutamate?

Alas the amount of herbicides used in the farming industry is not small.
It is a cultural thing, indeed. If they don't have the time to prepare a decent soup from scratch, Chileans preffer soup powder rather than canned soups.

You can buy tons of soup powders in Chile, everywhere. The only thing you have to do is to heat some water and put the contain in it.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sat Oct 30, 2010 6:39 pm

audeo13 wrote:...As for Chileans, they seem to be big fans of package soups - Lipton Soup styles, you know? I've seen alot of them use those, which I suppose could be considered a dehydrated soup can of sorts.
You can bet on it. Package soups are very popular and the second choice for a soup prepared from scratch. Perhaps it is a cultural thing after all. Dehidrated foods appeared in the Andes thousand of years before they spread to the world (think about Chuño, Charqui and other stuff) and I bet people is more accustumed to dehidrated foods rather than canned.

For the average Chilean, canned foods is tuna, salmon, sardines and peaches; not soup.

So, the reason you don't see much canned soups in the supermarkets is lack of demand. People don't buy them.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sat Oct 30, 2010 9:04 pm

Interesting comment, Patagoniax!

Indeed, the Patagonia is a different culture from central Chile, heavily influenced by northern Europeans. Where else you find people playing ice hockey? Or where else the cowboys use Basque hats? Even more, in the Argentinean Patagonia you can find people speaking Welsh :shock:

Interesting. One day I will ask you personally some things about your region, that interest me very much.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sat Oct 30, 2010 10:03 pm

Another difference, I believe, is the lack of Indigenous influences in the region, given the fact a genocide exterminated most of them. That fact makes it unique in Chile, a country that has LOT of Indigenous influences and traditions. Am I wrong?

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sun Oct 31, 2010 1:25 am

But certainly, the Indigenous influence in the region is close to zero. If anything, it may come with Chilotes and other Chileans rather than by the ancient Indigenous of the region and the few modern survivors.
By contrast, here in central Chile, half the food and a lot huaso traditions are related to the Indians. Don't you agree?

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:46 am

patagoniax wrote:
We have place-names from the various indigenous groups. Some of the place-names have been translated into Spanish. The mountain "Cerro Ballena" that is near my house on the fjord was originally named in the local Aonikenk language and had the same meaning as the Spanish term we now use, and we have forgotten the original Aonikenk expression. But other place-names down here still use the Aonikenk names.
Yes, but that's common in any country of the Americas or the Pacific. Canada or Australia, for example, have quite a bit of indigenous placenames, no matter theirs Indigenous there have but a very little influence in theirs culture.
patagoniax wrote: Southern Patagonia has little in common with the rest of Chile, other than a hopeless bureaucracy and barbaric taxistas. Serious colonisation did not get underway around here until about 1880. The Spanish colonisers of central Chile brought almost no women with them and took non-Spanish-speaking indigenous women as wives, ensuring that indigenous languages would heavily influence chilensis. Not so in southern Patagonia, where there was very little mixing with the few indigenous folks, and colonists included a substantial number of European women. Punta Arenas was much more European than any other city in Chile -- more so even than Valpo, and Santiago was never in the running. English and Croatian were widely spoken and have left their legacies all over the city, in spite of the now greater numbers of hijos de p... I mean, hijos de Chiloé.
Yes, we know that Patagonians are a different minority. About as strange to mainstream Chile as the Polynesians of Easter Island, or the Aymaras of Northern Chile. All of them minorities in our diverse country. In fact, the last group of "mainstream" Chileans we centroids usually recognize are Chilotes :mrgreen:
Patagonia is different, with people dressed in Basque hats, singuing Argentinean folk, controlling horses Uruguayan style, playing hockey as Canadians and counting Croatian ancestors... In fact, reading Coloane is reading a gringo. Something quite different from reading Mistral or Neruda. The little minority of these exotic Chileans of the icebergs is really another world.
patagoniax wrote: But we do have tinned soup, and treacle and Golden Syrup in the stores.
Of course.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sun Oct 31, 2010 10:55 am

patagoniax wrote:... There are still some Tehuelche/Aónikenk over on the Argentine side of the frontier but probably not many on the Chilean side.

As far as the kawashkar/alacalufes, I see some on occasion, mostly on the ferry ship or around Pto Eden, but they are disappearing.
I have researched a bit this topic and there is something funny about it. When people say Kawashkar/Alacalufes or Tehuelches disappeared, they think they left this world without decendents. In fact, today there are more people descendent of those natives, only that now they are mixed. Take for instance the case of the Calderon sister, that were interview a decade ago as the last Kawashkar. These old ladies were in fact natives living outside the so called "civilization" when they were children. They lived all theirs lives addapting to the new society. But they left many mixed descendats who addapted to the new society and that forgot theirs origins.
I bet in Austral Chile there are still around 5.000 or more mixed descendants of the ancient natives, but they won't recognize that condition. At least the government register 2.500 natives in southern Patagonia. Considering that the original native populations of the region were very small, they managed to survive somehow, after all.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Sun Oct 31, 2010 11:37 pm

Well, Magallanes isn't independent and it will never be. :mrgreen:
The last guy that tried was Captain Popper and you know how he ended.

Image

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by oregon woodsmoke » Mon Nov 01, 2010 1:16 pm

Patagoniax, those are beautiful photos.

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by pinguin » Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:32 pm

patagoniax wrote:
oregon woodsmoke wrote:Patagoniax, those are beautiful photos.
Thank you. Make sure you visit southern Patagonia before it is all paved.
Some day I will go to visit, certainly.
patagoniax wrote: Regarding pinguin's reference to Popper -- sorry, pinguino, wrong country. Julius Popper was a Romanian Jew who worked in Argentina, with occasional forays into Chile, but always based in Argentina. Popper always enforced Argentine claims in the territory and even tried to extend Argentine claims into parts of Antarctica -- he had nothing to do with any sort of "independent Chilean Magallanes republic." When the Argentine peso lost value, even the Argentines recognised the value of the gold coins that Popper stamped. He also printed his own postage stamps which today are collector items. And yes we know how Popper ended -- he made millions and died in Argentina. There was a fictionalised movie made about him by Littín, a chileno, who had a Cuban play Popper and changed the venue to Chile. Littín was accused of anti-semitism because the Jewish nature of Popper in real life was changed to his being portrayed as Eastern Orthodox in the film.
Popper is known in Central Chile. He is the paradigm of the genocidal mind. A foreign criminal that should have stayed in Europe.
In Toral's masterpiece at the University of Chile subway station, in Santiago, in the section of Chilean shame, there is a large paint with the following caption: "Captain Popper: Hunter of Onas". Besides, the following picture is all that we want to know about Popper.

Image

Popper was stubbed to death. At least he died in the same way he acted.
patagoniax wrote: The reference to the Republica Independiente is a local in-joke but it has some meaning since 90 percent of santiaguinos don't know that Magallanes is part of Chile.
Yes, it is a regional complain. I hope is nothing serious, such as the Polynesian and Mapuche calls for Independence :shock:

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Re: Why is there no canned soup in the supermarkets?

Post by soyena » Fri Dec 03, 2010 5:39 pm

I just bought a box of Campbell's Cream of Chichen at 1270/can from the importer where a friend of mine works. There are 48 cannes/box. Not sure how much they are if bought directly from Jumbo but I am told that they do sell through Jumbo.

So... I have lots of Cream of Chicken, if anyone wants to buy some from Vitacura :P

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