NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

All topics related to food in Chile including, Chilean food, expat food favorites, exchanging recipes, where to shop, hard to find foods, substitute ingredients and foods, food quality, restaurants, and more. If you can eat it in Chile, post it here.
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maxine
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by maxine » Fri Dec 10, 2010 10:02 pm

Tombi wrote:Maxine, did the custard powder come from the UK, or did your friend find it here? I was just thinking about trifle yesterday and home made custard is dull without custard powder.
The custard powder I had was Aussie but 2 weeks ago I found custard powder in Jumbo!! 2 packs per box. It's in the same section as a lot of their foreign foods section like cocnut milk, lemon tea, etc.. Let me know if you have trouble finding it and I'll grab you some next time I go shopping.
mlightheart wrote:maxine, did your friend get the Golden Syrup here in Chile or bring it into Chile?
Sorry, like the custard powder it was from Oz. Sorry. I'm going home in May so if you haven't found any by then and are getting desperate I'll bring you some back.

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Gloria
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by Gloria » Sat Dec 11, 2010 11:09 am

Does anyone knows where I could find ricotta, mascarpone, cannoli shells? also would be appreciated a name of an italian importer in Stgo where I could contact. Thanks.
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. Anótese, comuníquese, publíquese, archívese.
Please remind me the reasons why I decided to come back!

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Gloria
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To cheese lovers

Post by Gloria » Sat Dec 11, 2010 12:24 pm

We found this little dairy place 1/2 hour from our home that sells great herbal cheeses such as oregano, dill,chive and merken.We recently bought $35000 worth so we could try them all.They also have creamy cheese like mantecoso but softer.Really good stuff!
http://www.campomio.cl
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. Anótese, comuníquese, publíquese, archívese.
Please remind me the reasons why I decided to come back!

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mlightheart
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by mlightheart » Sat Dec 11, 2010 1:53 pm

patagoniax wrote:
greg~judy wrote: that no one has commented on the poor Chilean dietary study (see a few posts back)...
and ironically... the thread continued with one of the worst offenders - HFCS
... As far as an occasional biscuit with Golden Syrup, it was not so long ago that someone on the forum attempted to convince us that anything that doesn't kill us outright only makes us stronger. ...

Yes HFCS is bad for you, but Golden Syrup isn't HFCS. At least from what I read in wikipedia.

Tombi
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by Tombi » Sun Dec 12, 2010 11:32 am

Does anyone knows where I could find ricotta, mascarpone, cannoli shells
Ricotta is freely available here in in Santiago at Unimarc and Jumbo. I have only seen Mascarpone from time to time at Unimarc and Cannoli (I'm assuming you mean the sweet pastry, not the pasta cannolini?), only one terrible version at Restaurant Vendetta in Parque Arauco. It was filled and then covered in chocolate syrup. Blergh.

You could try Geraldine (restaurant), they have a deli and might be able to point you in the right direction with the cannoli shells.

PenquistaDeCorazon
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Sun Dec 12, 2010 11:55 am

Gloria wrote:Does anyone knows where I could find ricotta, mascarpone, cannoli shells? also would be appreciated a name of an italian importer in Stgo where I could contact. Thanks.
You will probably be able to find mascarpone if you search enough in the shops. But I imagine you will pay an arm and maybe 3 legs. Mascarpone and ricotta readily available here but before they were I used to make my own. Reasonable substitutes:

What you do with making mascarpone is merely lightly fermenting and altering the consistency of the cream.

From a website where I got recipes from:

"I enclose the two recipes I use, both authentic, both delicious, and as easy as falling off a log. You don't need a kit, or fancy ingredients, or even much time. Mascarpone takes 12-24 hours to set, but the actual work time is a matter of minutes."

Recipe #1 (Source unknown)

You'll need 1 pint (600ml) of fresh cream, and 1/2 teaspoon of tartaric acid (available from pharmacies and some grocers).

1. Pour the cream into the top of a double boiler and place over simmering water.
2. When the cream is warm, add the tartaric acid, and stir until cream reaches a temperature of 180 degrees (75-80 Celsius). Use a candy thermometer.
3. Remove from heat and allow to cool, stirring occasionally.
4. Pour the mixture into a bowl lined with thick cheesecloth or a doubled-over tea towel, and leave in a cool place for at least 12 hours, preferably 24.
5. Consume within 48 hours.

Giuliano Bugialli's Mascarpone

This is a sweeter recipe than the one above.

Ingredients: 1 quart (1 liter) fresh heavy cream, 1/4 tsp. tartaric acid (available from pharmacies and some grocers)

1. Place cream in a glass casserole or bowl, and place casserole into a larger flameproof pan.
2. Add cold water to a larger pan. Place the pan over medium heat and bring the cream to a temperature of 180 degrees (75-80 Celsius). Use a candy thermometer), stirring every so often with a wooden spoon.
3. As soon as the cream reaches the EXACT temperature, remove from the heat, add tartaric acid, and stir with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds.
4. Remove glass casserole or bowl from the larger pan, and stir another 2 minutes.
5. Line a fine-mesh basket or strainer with thick cheesecloth and pour in cream mixture.
6. Allow to stand for 12 hours in a cool place or on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.
7. Prepare four 9-inch squares of cheesecloth.
8. Divide mascarpone in four.
9. Place a quarter of it on each square of cheesecloth and fold like a package, without tying it.
10. Place packages on a plate and refrigerate for another 12 hours before using.


How To Substitute For Mascarpone

Sometimes, it's a lot easier just to substitute. Tiramisu creators have used ricotta or cottage cheese as successful substitutes by whipping the cheese until it is smooth.

Other sources have created their own substitutions. In the Epicurean Chef's Forum, "Kim" posted the following: "I found a substitution that worked okay is 8 ounces of softened cream cheese, plus 3 tablespoons of sour cream, plus 2 tablespoons of heavy cream (liquid, not whipped).

In "The Cook's Thesaurus," the following are suggested: (1) Blend 8 ounces softened cream cheese with 1/4 cup whipping cream, or (2) blend 8 ounces softened cream cheese with 1 tablespoon cream or butter or milk, or (3) Blend 6 ounces softened cream cheese with 1/4 cup butter and 1/4 cup cream (or Montrachet).

Ricotta is very easy to make at home as well.....
I prefer a bechamel for lasagne but if rushed I will pick ricotta over cottage cheese every time:
http://italianfood.about.com/library/rec/blr0949.htm
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... tta-234282

PenquistaDeCorazon
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Sun Dec 12, 2010 12:06 pm

And I meant to point out that the cream cannot be ultra-pasteurized.
http://www.cheapethniceatz.com/2009/11/ ... ascarpone/

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Gloria
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by Gloria » Sun Dec 12, 2010 12:34 pm

Tombi wrote:
Does anyone knows where I could find ricotta, mascarpone, cannoli shells
Ricotta is freely available here in in Santiago at Unimarc and Jumbo. I have only seen Mascarpone from time to time at Unimarc and Cannoli (I'm assuming you mean the sweet pastry, not the pasta cannolini?), only one terrible version at Restaurant Vendetta in Parque Arauco. It was filled and then covered in chocolate syrup. Blergh.

You could try Geraldine (restaurant), they have a deli and might be able to point you in the right direction with the cannoli shells.
Thanks a lot for the info.I'll look it up in the yellow pages (since I live in the south) and try to contact them. I have looked in almost all the supers ( we can only rely on Unimarc, Bigger, Lider but with limited international provisions) for ricotta and nothing, I believe is due to the lack of italians and demand. I imagined it would be a long shot to even ask for cannoli shells, yes, those little sweet tubes filled with ricotta. I have a "killer recipe" so I guess it would be better for me to roll up my sleeves and make them although they are time consuming but worth every morsel! :D Mascarpone, probably I'll have to do the same.
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. Anótese, comuníquese, publíquese, archívese.
Please remind me the reasons why I decided to come back!

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Gloria
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by Gloria » Sun Dec 12, 2010 12:49 pm

PenquistaDeCorazon wrote:
Gloria wrote:Does anyone knows where I could find ricotta, mascarpone, cannoli shells? also would be appreciated a name of an italian importer in Stgo where I could contact. Thanks.
You will probably be able to find mascarpone if you search enough in the shops. But I imagine you will pay an arm and maybe 3 legs. Mascarpone and ricotta readily available here but before they were I used to make my own. Reasonable substitutes:

What you do with making mascarpone is merely lightly fermenting and altering the consistency of the cream.

From a website where I got recipes from:

"I enclose the two recipes I use, both authentic, both delicious, and as easy as falling off a log. You don't need a kit, or fancy ingredients, or even much time. Mascarpone takes 12-24 hours to set, but the actual work time is a matter of minutes."

Recipe #1 (Source unknown)

You'll need 1 pint (600ml) of fresh cream, and 1/2 teaspoon of tartaric acid (available from pharmacies and some grocers).

1. Pour the cream into the top of a double boiler and place over simmering water.
2. When the cream is warm, add the tartaric acid, and stir until cream reaches a temperature of 180 degrees (75-80 Celsius). Use a candy thermometer.
3. Remove from heat and allow to cool, stirring occasionally.
4. Pour the mixture into a bowl lined with thick cheesecloth or a doubled-over tea towel, and leave in a cool place for at least 12 hours, preferably 24.
5. Consume within 48 hours.

Giuliano Bugialli's Mascarpone

This is a sweeter recipe than the one above.

Ingredients: 1 quart (1 liter) fresh heavy cream, 1/4 tsp. tartaric acid (available from pharmacies and some grocers)

1. Place cream in a glass casserole or bowl, and place casserole into a larger flameproof pan.
2. Add cold water to a larger pan. Place the pan over medium heat and bring the cream to a temperature of 180 degrees (75-80 Celsius). Use a candy thermometer), stirring every so often with a wooden spoon.
3. As soon as the cream reaches the EXACT temperature, remove from the heat, add tartaric acid, and stir with a wooden spoon for 30 seconds.
4. Remove glass casserole or bowl from the larger pan, and stir another 2 minutes.
5. Line a fine-mesh basket or strainer with thick cheesecloth and pour in cream mixture.
6. Allow to stand for 12 hours in a cool place or on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator.
7. Prepare four 9-inch squares of cheesecloth.
8. Divide mascarpone in four.
9. Place a quarter of it on each square of cheesecloth and fold like a package, without tying it.
10. Place packages on a plate and refrigerate for another 12 hours before using.


How To Substitute For Mascarpone

Sometimes, it's a lot easier just to substitute. Tiramisu creators have used ricotta or cottage cheese as successful substitutes by whipping the cheese until it is smooth.

Other sources have created their own substitutions. In the Epicurean Chef's Forum, "Kim" posted the following: "I found a substitution that worked okay is 8 ounces of softened cream cheese, plus 3 tablespoons of sour cream, plus 2 tablespoons of heavy cream (liquid, not whipped).

In "The Cook's Thesaurus," the following are suggested: (1) Blend 8 ounces softened cream cheese with 1/4 cup whipping cream, or (2) blend 8 ounces softened cream cheese with 1 tablespoon cream or butter or milk, or (3) Blend 6 ounces softened cream cheese with 1/4 cup butter and 1/4 cup cream (or Montrachet).

Ricotta is very easy to make at home as well.....
I prefer a bechamel for lasagne but if rushed I will pick ricotta over cottage cheese every time:
http://italianfood.about.com/library/rec/blr0949.htm
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/ ... tta-234282
Wow! Thank you for all your work. I'm gonna have to try to do this after the holidays since is kind of labor intense. I have cravings for cannolis, tiramisú and all those good italian pastries, but at least if I only could find ricotta I'll be happy although it must be expensive here. Thinking back at those days that I used to buy "impastata" ( a thicker and richer ricotta) to fill cannolis when I had my shop. Yep, 25 lbs or more every week! Those were the days.. :)
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. Anótese, comuníquese, publíquese, archívese.
Please remind me the reasons why I decided to come back!

PenquistaDeCorazon
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sat Nov 13, 2010 1:50 am

Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Sun Dec 12, 2010 12:57 pm

They key to making light work of cannoli shells is tackling Sfogliatelle. After rolling out sfogliatelle you will never find cannolli time consuming again.....

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mlightheart
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by mlightheart » Sun Dec 12, 2010 1:44 pm

patx, for each can of Golden Syrup, about how much could you measure out? One cup? One half cup?

Thanks.

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Gloria
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Re: NEW FOOD IN CHILE FORUM

Post by Gloria » Sun Dec 12, 2010 1:53 pm

PenquistaDeCorazon wrote:They key to making light work of cannoli shells is tackling Sfogliatelle. After rolling out sfogliatelle you will never find cannolli time consuming again.....
True, I made sfogliatelle once ( when in the US) and I decided it was easier to buy them that making them! on the other hand cannolis at the beginnig are a "pain" ( the wooden rods have to be "seasoned" for them to work) but the dough itself it's not a problem. Thanks again for your input.
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. Anótese, comuníquese, publíquese, archívese.
Please remind me the reasons why I decided to come back!

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