Sugary food in chile

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thisisreallycomplicated
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by thisisreallycomplicated » Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:43 am

I only had salmon here a few times, and it was from Jumbo. So I'm probably safe from that. Now I just buy fish that was canned, I think right here in Coquimbo. Although who knows where it was, before it got into the can? One thing that's always bothered me, and I try not to think about, is all the stuff grown right next to ruta 5. Anyway, I figure the processed stuff originally comes from the same place as the non-processed. So neither one is without problems. But at least the non-processed is closer to what we've adapted to over thousands or millions of years.
“Now it’s conspiracy – they’ve made that something that should not even be entertained for a minute, that powerful people might get together and have a plan. Doesn’t happen, you’re a kook, you’re a conspiracy buff!” – George Carlin

thisisreallycomplicated
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by thisisreallycomplicated » Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:50 am

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:48 am
Yes, the cancer rate here has to give one pause. But Chile was also downwind from the nuclear testing in the South Pacific by USA/France/etc. decades back.
There's a timelapse video map of all the nuclear testing here, except for the most recent ones, in case anyone hasn't seen it before:
https://nukewatch.org/tests.html

It also shows a fallout map for the US.
“Now it’s conspiracy – they’ve made that something that should not even be entertained for a minute, that powerful people might get together and have a plan. Doesn’t happen, you’re a kook, you’re a conspiracy buff!” – George Carlin

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41southchile
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by 41southchile » Wed Mar 13, 2019 7:16 am

Merluza https://www.soychile.cl/Puerto-Montt/So ... Montt.aspx
Mariscos https://www.soychile.cl/Chiloe/Policial ... Ancud.aspx
This was just yesterday, these story's are in the news every week. Oh but apparantly the fisheries are being destroyed by the powerful families in Chile that get all the fishing quota and the poor old artesanal humble fisherman can't make a living anymore. I hope the marines and sernapesca increase their patrols and catch more of these pirates and confiscate permanently boats and equipment these crooks own, then I suppose they will go and complain their human rights have been violated. Same story everywhere, everyone wants their "rights" but none of the responsibilities that come with them. Exactly the same situation with all these people crying that they have no public access to lakes or rivers yet leave trash and plastic bottles and crap everywhere on the shore.
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mem
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by mem » Wed Mar 13, 2019 11:07 am

41southchile wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:11 am
eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:55 am
I rarely eat Chile salmon, it is all farmed toxic shit.

I buy what I know is locally caught in San Antonio. Anyone with experience or basic knowledge can determine how fresh a fish is.
Yeah , how about seafood? Could you tell if that had been caught in an area with marea roja? Has happened here the other day after a boat was intercepted having been fishing in areas closed due to red tide . I suppose I should be thankful that they are actually catching these sorts of people that are plundering whatever they can for some quick under the table lukas and dammed the consequences for any consumers.
Yes the salmon debacle really gobsmacked me when I read about it. My kids favorite eating out entree used to be salmon, but now knowing what I know it's hard to order it. I wish there were some "wild caught salmon" somewhere to buy, but it seems there isnt because literally all commercially sold salmon is farmed. There are apparently some salmon in the bigger rivers around chile but they seem pretty rare

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hlf2888
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by hlf2888 » Wed Mar 13, 2019 8:26 pm

mem wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 11:06 pm
hlf2888 wrote:
Tue Mar 12, 2019 8:22 pm
Most people are years behind in studying and applying the relationship between diet, nutrition and health. I buy very few packaged products but when I do, I know what is inside. The only decent additive free mustard and/or sauerkraut I have found is imported from Germany. Had to bring a lead free fermentation pot to make my own.
Thats a great idea, some of the stuff from europe can be pretty good.

Another abomination is ice cream in chile. I mean the garbage they sell in the tubs here is just beyond the pale. The "best" ice cream, meaning the least offensive is Haagen Daz and boy is that not saying much. I mentioned to a friend in the US that the "best" ice cream here is Haagen Daz if you can find it in the stores and he was just appalled

I think you are on the right track...you gotta make your own. Finding organic ice cream made from free range grass fed cows is just not possible...let alone free from needless stupid asinine additives. The only option is to make your own and that will also mean procuring a bunch of hectares and a bunch of free range grass fed cows. I can get milk from the farmers with a bit of cream, but getting pure cream I have not been able to...enough to make my own ice cream. The cream in the stores is yet another abomination if you care to read the ingredients

I just can't believe how little to no standards the locals have here for what they shove down their gullet. The typical ice cream tubs that the el tits, unimarcs, and liders stock are just disgusting, it's like fake food that consists almost entirely of artificial flavors and colors and stabilizers.

What really makes me despair is knowing how common it is for chileans to want to pay the lowest price for anything. Results be damned. Longevity be damned, Quality be damned. Just give me the lowest price in pesos!

And then that crosses over to the food they are buying...and so it is a cycle of despair that the mean will ever change and at least, for the love of Ohiggins, have some standards for what people are eating and forcing their family/kids to eat while they are winning cause they saved a few pesos...ffs
what bothers me the most, mem, is what they give their children. A product called Nido, a can of powdered chemicals. And the fact that companies can get away with producing toxic products for children who have nobody to advocate for them. This is not unique to Chile. Same multinational companies, but their chemical concoctions have different names in different countries. Sent you a pm.

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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by HybridAmbassador » Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:09 pm

mem wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 11:07 am
41southchile wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:11 am
eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:
Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:55 am
I rarely eat Chile salmon, it is all farmed toxic shit.

I buy what I know is locally caught in San Antonio. Anyone with experience or basic knowledge can determine how fresh a fish is.
Yeah , how about seafood? Could you tell if that had been caught in an area with marea roja? Has happened here the other day after a boat was intercepted having been fishing in areas closed due to red tide . I suppose I should be thankful that they are actually catching these sorts of people that are plundering whatever they can for some quick under the table lukas and dammed the consequences for any consumers.
Yes the salmon debacle really gobsmacked me when I read about it. My kids favorite eating out entree used to be salmon, but now knowing what I know it's hard to order it. I wish there were some "wild caught salmon" somewhere to buy, but it seems there isnt because literally all commercially sold salmon is farmed. There are apparently some salmon in the bigger rivers around chile but they seem pretty rare
When doing some shopping in Costco US, always attracted to the sea food section. I rejoice when finding Link Cod product of NZ but when I see farmed Salmon from Chile displayed, instantly thinking of anti-biotics fed to those Salmons in captivity and fear taking ahold of my anciano body! Siempre looking for those Atlantic caught Salmons.. But at Costco Tokyo, their Salmons are from Hokkaido so very safe to consume...
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at46
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by at46 » Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:40 pm

The fish was fine when caught, it's the unsanitary packaging and transportation that they had an issue with. And the lack of legal paperwork.

Same with the mariscos - they were caught illegally, but it says nothing about them not being suitable for human consumption.

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41southchile
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by 41southchile » Thu Mar 14, 2019 4:29 pm

at46 wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:40 pm
The fish was fine when caught, it's the unsanitary packaging and transportation that they had an issue with. And the lack of legal paperwork.

Same with the mariscos - they were caught illegally, but it says nothing about them not being suitable for human consumption.
That's my point, illegal fishing and improper handling etc. Apparantly back in the 1990s you could go along the coast in Los Lagos and get a 50 kilo sack of mariscos for a pack of cigarettes. Fishermen caught so much , they practically gave it away or just dumped it again into the sea if they couldn't get rid of , and yet now they all seem so perplexed and mystified as to why there is no seafood left or fish that used to be so abundant . I realise it's not only a Chile issue. Fish stocks and seafood stocks have collapsed worldwide, it's going to have to be all farmed fish in the future because the cupboard is bare in most places. Yet all this illegal fishing still goes on here and no one gives a stuff I guess they figure get what they still can, before it's completely gone.
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by at46 » Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:26 pm

41southchile wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 4:29 pm
at46 wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 2:40 pm
The fish was fine when caught, it's the unsanitary packaging and transportation that they had an issue with. And the lack of legal paperwork.

Same with the mariscos - they were caught illegally, but it says nothing about them not being suitable for human consumption.
That's my point, illegal fishing and improper handling etc. Apparantly back in the 1990s you could go along the coast in Los Lagos and get a 50 kilo sack of mariscos for a pack of cigarettes. Fishermen caught so much , they practically gave it away or just dumped it again into the sea if they couldn't get rid of , and yet now they all seem so perplexed and mystified as to why there is no seafood left or fish that used to be so abundant . I realise it's not only a Chile issue. Fish stocks and seafood stocks have collapsed worldwide, it's going to have to be all farmed fish in the future because the cupboard is bare in most places. Yet all this illegal fishing still goes on here and no one gives a stuff I guess they figure get what they still can, before it's completely gone.
I like the artisanal fishermen anywhere I see them - in Valpo, Concon, Quintero. I think it's neat, their rough boats, them fixing the motors, nets and crab cages, right where they live. This kind of lifestyle has been completely eliminated in Canada.

They do come in with good catches in the mornings. They wouldn't be doing it if there was no fish, right? So I'm not buying too much into the collapsing fish stocks - this idea of barren seas only benefits big corporations that produce and sell that goddamned farmed salmon. And, of course, they have all the money to buy scientific research to prove collapsing fish stocks.

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:22 pm

at46 wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:26 pm
I like the artisanal fishermen anywhere I see them - in Valpo, Concon, Quintero. I think it's neat, their rough boats, them fixing the motors, nets and crab cages, right where they live. This kind of lifestyle has been completely eliminated in Canada.

They do come in with good catches in the mornings. They wouldn't be doing it if there was no fish, right? So I'm not buying too much into the collapsing fish stocks - this idea of barren seas only benefits big corporations that produce and sell that goddamned farmed salmon. And, of course, they have all the money to buy scientific research to prove collapsing fish stocks.
Same here, today I bought my six live crabs for $2000 from a stall I have purchased from a couple times before.

No they are correct. The laws that have been passed favor the Big Fish companies including foreign that essentially vacuum up fish and other sea products and leave the artesanales and the future of Chile's ocean wealth SOL. I have been living on the coast since 2006 and have seen how the local merluza catch has dwindled and fallen in size (of the fish). Then the local artesanales focused on jibia and then got screwed again by legislation favoring Big Fish.

During the recent merluza veda, the aretsanales sold it as "pescado" without further description :wink: :wink: and somehow escaped the authorities who probably sympathized with the artesanales on that one.
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:38 pm

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 8:22 pm
at46 wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 7:26 pm
I like the artisanal fishermen anywhere I see them - in Valpo, Concon, Quintero. I think it's neat, their rough boats, them fixing the motors, nets and crab cages, right where they live. This kind of lifestyle has been completely eliminated in Canada.

They do come in with good catches in the mornings. They wouldn't be doing it if there was no fish, right? So I'm not buying too much into the collapsing fish stocks - this idea of barren seas only benefits big corporations that produce and sell that goddamned farmed salmon. And, of course, they have all the money to buy scientific research to prove collapsing fish stocks.
Same here, today I bought my six live crabs for $2000 from a stall I have purchased from a couple times before.
Those live crabs, are they the blue crabs or crabs abundant in west coast US? Last time you took me to San Antonio fish market don't remember seeing any crabs, are they easy to harvest in San Antonio area seas ?
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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Sugary food in chile

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Fri Mar 15, 2019 3:54 pm

They are similar to decent size rock crabs of the US west coast.

Locally, crabs appear to still be quite plentiful along with mussels and clams. Jibia appears to have disappeared and large octopus I haven't seen any lately. Congrio, merluza, reineta, corvina, jurel, sierra, albacora, quantity and size vary day to day, week to week, month to month, one becomes comparatively plentiful and the others become scarcer and then it swings again.
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