Wine of the week

All topics related to food in Chile including, Chilean food, expat food favorites, exchanging recipes, where to shop, hard to find foods, substitute ingredients and foods, food quality, restaurants, and more. If you can eat it in Chile, post it here.
Forum rules
No advertising. Please post in the classifieds section.
User avatar
zer0nz
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 5779
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 4:46 am
Location: Lost!
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by zer0nz » Fri Oct 04, 2013 8:45 am

pnv wrote:I would love to hear your opinion on the "Uva Pais".
Are there any other wine makers besides Torres selling bottled wine made with this grape?
its used for chicha....

and i see the only reason torres did it was cause the government and university funded it as a ag research project.....

im going to make an assumption there is a lot of grapes out there planted for the production of chicha and they want to find a way to increase there value for the farmer....

They wouldn't dare try and increase the price of the chicha at 18.. it would cause a national strike!

the wine shops are marketing it as a up scale chicha... im guessing the type you dont add pinapple ice cream too...
if it has the sweetness of chicha its too much for me!

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:08 pm

pnv wrote:I would love to hear your opinion on the "Uva Pais".
Are there any other wine makers besides Torres selling bottled wine made with this grape?

Gato Negro..... is Pais


but for something different, you asked for it you got it 100% Pais........



http://chilecopadevino.com/2013/10/04/e ... el-torres/
It's all about the wine.

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 04, 2013 4:11 pm

zer0nz wrote:
pnv wrote:I would love to hear your opinion on the "Uva Pais".
Are there any other wine makers besides Torres selling bottled wine made with this grape?
its used for chicha....

and i see the only reason torres did it was cause the government and university funded it as a ag research project.....

im going to make an assumption there is a lot of grapes out there planted for the production of chicha and they want to find a way to increase there value for the farmer....

They wouldn't dare try and increase the price of the chicha at 18.. it would cause a national strike!

the wine shops are marketing it as a up scale chicha... im guessing the type you dont add pinapple ice cream too...
if it has the sweetness of chicha its too much for me!



stolen from Janis Robinson site re your comments:

"Pais is known as Criolla Chica in Argentina (where it is similarly reviled) and Mission in California. As we outline in Wine Grapes, it has been shown by DNA analysis to be identical to the Spanish variety Listán Prieto, today grown only on the Canary islands. In Chile it is grown mainly in Maule and Bío Bío and most of it is used to make cheap pink wine sold in cardboard cartons on the domestic market. But back in 2007, a project was undertaken under the auspices of the Ministry of Agriculture, the University of Talca and Miguel Torres Chile to research ways of producing something finer from this huge resource (15,000 hectares of the variety in total in Chile grown by 8,000 smallholders, making it the country's second most planted grape variety after Cabernet Sauvignon). The idea is to help the sustainability of those who grow Pais, the single variety most suited to the conditions of much of Maule and Bío Bío."

There is allot of it in Chile and its very important to the small producers in the south.................
It's all about the wine.

User avatar
greg~judy
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2982
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:00 pm
Location: citoyens du(h) monde

Re: wine bullshit...

Post by greg~judy » Fri Oct 04, 2013 9:35 pm

~
well jeez, nwd~
we're a bit miffed that our recent "chilled chardonnay" observation didn't warrant a response...
ok, then let's see if "whine afficianados" can ignore this one...?
Wine-tasting: it's junk science

Every year Robert Hodgson selects the finest wines from his small California winery and puts them into competitions around the state.

And in most years, the results are surprisingly inconsistent: some whites rated as gold medallists in one contest do badly in another. Reds adored by some panels are dismissed by others. Over the decades Hodgson, a softly spoken retired oceanographer, became curious. Judging wines is by its nature subjective, but the awards appeared to be handed out at random.

So drawing on his background in statistics, Hodgson approached the organisers of the California State Fair wine competition, the oldest contest of its kind in North America, and proposed an experiment for their annual June tasting sessions.

Each panel of four judges would be presented with their usual "flight" of samples to sniff, sip and slurp. But some wines would be presented to the panel three times, poured from the same bottle each time. The results would be compiled and analysed to see whether wine testing really is scientific.

The first experiment took place in 2005. The last was in Sacramento earlier this month. Hodgson's findings have stunned the wine industry. Over the years he has shown again and again that even trained, professional palates are terrible at judging wine.

"The results are disturbing," says Hodgson from the Fieldbrook Winery in Humboldt County, described by its owner as a rural paradise. "Only about 10% of judges are consistent and those judges who were consistent one year were ordinary the next year.

"Chance has a great deal to do with the awards that wines win."

These judges are not amateurs either. They read like a who's who of the American wine industry from winemakers, sommeliers, critics and buyers to wine consultants and academics. In Hodgson's tests, judges rated wines on a scale running from 50 to 100. In practice, most wines scored in the 70s, 80s and low 90s.

Results from the first four years of the experiment, published in the Journal of Wine Economics, showed a typical judge's scores varied by plus or minus four points over the three blind tastings. A wine deemed to be a good 90 would be rated as an acceptable 86 by the same judge minutes later and then an excellent 94.

Some of the judges were far worse, others better – with around one in 10 varying their scores by just plus or minus two. A few points may not sound much but it is enough to swing a contest – and gold medals are worth a significant amount in extra sales for wineries.

Hodgson went on to analyse the results of wine competitions across California, and found that their medals were distributed at random.

His studies have irritated many figures in the industry. "They say I'm full of bullshit but that's OK. I'm proud of what I do. It's part of my academic background to find the truth.''

Hodgson isn't alone in questioning the science of wine-tasting. French academic Frédéric Brochet tested the effect of labels in 2001. He presented the same Bordeaux superior wine to 57 volunteers a week apart and in two different bottles – one for a table wine, the other for a grand cru.

The tasters were fooled.

When tasting a supposedly superior wine, their language was more positive – describing it as complex, balanced, long and woody. When the same wine was presented as plonk, the critics were more likely to use negatives such as weak, light and flat.

In 2008 a study of 6,000 blind tastings by Robin Goldstein in the Journal of Wine Economics found a positive link between the price of wine and the amount people enjoyed it. But the link only existed for people trained to detect the elements of wine that make them expensive.

In 2011 Professor Richard Wiseman, a psychologist (and former professional magician) at Hertfordshire University invited 578 people to comment on a range of red and white wines, varying from £3.49 for a claret to £30 for champagne, and tasted blind.

People could tell the difference between wines under £5 and those above £10 only 53% of the time for whites and only 47% of the time for reds. Overall they would have been just as a successful flipping a coin to guess.

So why are ordinary drinkers and the experts so poor at tasting blind? Part of the answer lies in the sheer complexity of wine.

For a drink made by fermenting fruit juice, wine is a remarkably sophisticated chemical cocktail. Dr Bryce Rankine, an Australian wine scientist, identified 27 distinct organic acids in wine, 23 varieties of alcohol in addition to the common ethanol, more than 80 esters and aldehydes, 16 sugars, plus a long list of assorted vitamins and minerals that wouldn't look out of place on the ingredients list of a cereal pack. There are even harmless traces of lead and arsenic that come from the soil.

Three of wine's most basic qualities – sweetness, sourness and bitterness – are picked up by the tongue's taste buds. A good wine has the perfect balance of sweet from the sugar in grapes, sourness from the acids, particularly tartaric and malic acid, and bitterness from alcohol and polyphenols, including tannins.

Many wines are more acidic than lemon juice and are only palatable because that acidity is balanced by sweetness and bitterness. "It's the holy trinity of the palate – sugar, acid and alcohol," says Dr James Hutchinson, a wine expert at the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Professionals distinguish between the balance of these three basic elements and a wine's flavour. And here the chemistry gets more complicated.

The flavour of wine – its aroma or bouquet – is detected not by the taste buds, but by millions of receptors in the olfactory bulb, a blob of nervous tissue where the brain meets the nasal passage.

Chemists have identified at least 400 aroma compounds that work on their own and with others to create complex flavours – some appearing immediately on first sniffing, others emerging only as an aftertaste. Most of these are volatiles – aromatic compounds that tend to have a low boiling point and waft away from glasses and tongues towards the olfactory bulb.

Some of these, the primary volatiles, are present in the grape. Others, the secondaries, are generated by yeast activity during fermentation. The rest, the tertiary volatiles, are formed as wine matures in barrels or bottles.
Jimi Hendrix More evidence that wine-tasting is influenced by context was provided by a 2008 study from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. The team found that different music could boost tasters’ wine scores by 60%. Researchers discovered that a blast of Jimi Hendrix enhanced cabernet sauvignon while Kylie Minogue went well with chardonnay.

Over the last few decades, wine scientists have begun to identify the compounds responsible for some of the distinctive aromas in wine.

The grassy, gooseberry quality of sauvignon blanc, for instance, comes from a class of chemicals called methoxypyrazines. These contain nitrogen and are byproducts of the metabolism of amino acids in the grape. Concentrations are higher in cooler climates, which is why New Zealand sauvignon blancs are often more herbaceous than Australian ones.

The flowery aroma of muscat and gewürztraminer comes from a class of alcohol compounds called monoterpenes. These include linalool – a substance also used in perfumes and insecticide – and geraniol, a pale yellow liquid that doubles up as an effective mosquito repellent and gives geranium its distinctive smell.

The spicy notes of chardonnay have been attributed to compounds called megastigmatrienones, also found in grapefruit juice.

"People underestimate how clever the olfactory system is at detecting aromas and our brain is at interpreting them," says Hutchinson.

"The olfactory system has the complexity in terms of its protein receptors to detect all the different aromas, but the brain response isn't always up to it. But I'm a believer that everyone has the same equipment and it comes down to learning how to interpret it." Within eight tastings, most people can learn to detect and name a reasonable range of aromas in wine, Hutchinson says.

Detecting and finding the right vocabulary may be within everyone's grasp. But when it comes to ranking wines, Hutchinson shares Robert Hodgson's concerns.

"There's a lot of nonsense and emperor's new clothes in the wine world," Hutchinson says. "I have had a number of wines costing hundreds of pounds that have disappointed me – and a number costing between £5 and £10 which have been absolutely surprising."

People struggle with assessing wine because the brain's interpretation of aroma and bouquet is based on far more than the chemicals found in the drink. Temperature plays a big part. Volatiles in wine are more active when wine is warmer. Serve a New World chardonnay too cold and you'll only taste the overpowering oak. Serve a red too warm and the heady boozy qualities will be overpowering.

Colour affects our perceptions too. In 2001 Frédérick Brochet of the University of Bordeaux asked 54 wine experts to test two glasses of wine – one red, one white. Using the typical language of tasters, the panel described the red as "jammy' and commented on its crushed red fruit.

The critics failed to spot that both wines were from the same bottle. The only difference was that one had been coloured red with a flavourless dye.

Other environmental factors play a role. A judge's palate is affected by what she or he had earlier, the time of day, their tiredness, their health – even the weather.

For Hutchinson and Hodgson the unpredictability means that human scores of wines are of limited value.

"It's very subjective and there's a lot of politics marring it," says Hutchinson. "People should use it as one indicator and not as an end-all. It would be a great sadness if people were only driven by what critics say."
Scallops Is there a scientific basis for the belief that red wine does not go with seafood? Researchers from Japanese drinks firm Mercian tested 64 varieties of wine with scallops, and concluded that the iron content of red wine speeded up the decay of fish, resulting in an overly ‘fishy’ taste. Photograph: Alamy

So if people cannot be relied on to judge wine, how about machines?

"In terms of replicating what a human can do we are a long way off," Hutchinson says. "The one thing we can do well, though, is a lot of amazing analytical chemistry that allows us to detect a huge range of different compounds in a glass of wine.

''We can start to have an indication of how the acidity balances with the sweetness and different levels of flavour compounds.

"But the step we haven't got to is how that raw chemical information can be crunched together and converted into something that reflects someone's emotional response. That might be something we can never achieve."

Meanwhile the blind tasting contests go on. Robert Hodgson is determined to improve the quality of judging. He has developed a test that will determine whether a judge's assessment of a blind-tasted glass in a medal competition is better than chance. The research will be presented at a conference in Cape Town this year. But the early findings are not promising.

"So far I've yet to find someone who passes," he says.

In 2007, Richard E Quandt, a Princeton economics professor, published a paper entitled "On Wine Bullshit: Some New Software?" The study sought to describe the "unholy union" of "bullshit and bullshit artists who are impelled to comment on it", in this case wine and wine critics.
Quandt compiled a "vocabulary of wine descriptors" containing 123 terms from "angular" to "violets" via other nonsense descriptions such as "fireplace" and "tannins, fine-grained".

Then, with the help of colleagues, he built an algorithm that generated wine reviews of hypothetical wines using his "vocabulary of bullshit". For instance: "Château L'Ordure Pomerol, 2004. Fine minerality, dried apricots and cedar characterise this sage-laden wine bursting with black fruit and toasty oak." He concluded that whether his reviews were "any more bullshit" than real ones was a "judgment call".
Sadly, he didn't explore how long it would take a monkey to type a wine review.
:idea:
:mrgreen:
:alien:
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

User avatar
eeuunikkeiexpat
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 8311
Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:38 am
Location: Megalith of unknown origin near my digs, south V Region coast

Re: Wine of the week

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Fri Oct 04, 2013 9:48 pm

Oh c'mon. Many times I have downed a quite agreeable $3.000 700-750 ml wine and then quaffed some $1.900 1.5 L stuff. The 1.5 L stuff taste varies from vinegary to the hit-or-miss better cepas good fruit juice/very decent more-than-table wine taste.

Where is Rune these days?
There are two ways to be fooled.

One is to believe what isn't true;

the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

- Søren Kierkegaard

User avatar
greg~judy
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2982
Joined: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:00 pm
Location: citoyens du(h) monde

Re: Whine of the week...

Post by greg~judy » Thu Oct 10, 2013 1:02 pm

greg~judy wrote:~
the whine of the week will be any nicely chilled chardonnay from region central...
:|
State of emergency declared as late frost hits Chile wine production, fruit crops

Chile declared a state of emergency after a late frost caused an estimated €1 billion worth of damage to fruit crops, potentially hitting wine production as well.
The affected central region is the main fruit and wine producing area in Chile and includes vineyards owned by prominent local wine label Concha yToro.
"These frosts are the worst that agriculture has faced in 84 years, impacting the area from Coquimbo to Bio Bio," the national agricultural society said.
Fruit trade association Fedefruta has given an early estimate of up the of damage from the extensive cold snap late last month.
It estimates the frost damaged between 35% and 61% of stoned fruit crops, 57% of almonds, 48% of kiwi crops and 20% of table grapes.
Early wine grape varieties such as Chardonnay and Pinot Noir have also been hit.
However, Fedefruta said most crops had not yet reached full flower and was not yet possible to give an exact damage forecast.
~
it seems like no allchilleans are taking this too seriously...?
:|
Two sets of “black” frosts hit Chile’s vineyards hard.
Americas Export manager for Ventisquero Juan Ignacio Zuñiga told a room of journalists and sommeliers about the late September and early October double whammy.
“The worst case scenario is 70 per cent of the crop,” said Zuñiga “and the best case, 30 per cent.”
Wineries employed wind machines and irrigation systems to spread the cold air and abate the damage but ran out of water by day three.
“This is the worst type of frost,” he noted. “Beyond control.”
...“these frosts are the worst that agriculture has faced in 84 years, impacting the area from Coquimbo to Bio Bio,” the national agricultural society said.
then the article goes on to offer up a few quaffable vinos <from previous harvests>... http://o.canada.com/life/food-drink/a-c ... s-blowing/
I tasted more than 40 wines at the Wines of Chile event. While some of the most impressive examples were to be found at the highest prices, it was the $15-30 range that showed what Chile can do best.

Here are 10 examples of the new Chile.

Via Chilcas Single Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon 2009 ($17.95, 309757) from the Maule Valley is graced by amazing freshness and vigorous, new wave energy. With an imagined dragon’s foot securely planted in the ancestry of Chilean wine, this radioactive red is a portal to the industry’s future. Roasted and brewed, in espresso yes but mocha, no. “Welcome to the new age, to the new age.” 91 @ViaWines

Viña Ventisquero Grey Chardonnay 2012 ($19.95) shows off Casablanca Valley elegance, from 13 year-old vines. Born of a south-facing slope on a single block of dirt within a vineyard. A mellow toast that sparkles aromatically is surely quartz and iodine speaking from out of the granite-flecked red clay over a granite foundation. A touch cool-climate turpenic, in citrus and apple. Veers anti-tropical with just a kiss (eight to ten months) of oak. Super fresh, low and slow bister layered despite the warm and challenging vintage. 89 @vventisquero @FitoZuniga

Errazuriz Single Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc 2012 ($21.95, 143198) comes out of the Aconcagua Valley, very near and dear to its Andes ombra shadow. Maceration mouthfeel ushered in on a viscous, spicy, piquant, capsicum wave. High tree fruit notes for Sauvignon Blanc place the wine somewhere between California and Marlborough. An SB heavyweight, with spice that plays and replays, balm prominence and righteous length. Oh, brother, she’s got blue-eyed soul, “my mash potato baby, a little Latin Lupelu.” 90 @errazurizwines @fcobaetting

Emiliana Coyam 2010 ($29.95, 649679) is the organic outfit’s “icon” wine, swarthy, round, powerful and well-rounded. While their flagship Gê achieves the apex of the sustainable movement, the Coyam is missing nothing. Has got everything but the girl; Syrah, Carmenère, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mourvèdre and Petit Verdot. A prime example of what stressed vines in healthy Colchagua Valley vineyards can do on a wild and volatile yeast journey. A broad spectrum of vinous material is on display and they cry out in unison, “like the deserts miss the rain.” Great freshness and so very berry, with supporting though not overbearing vanilla and a trenchant yet clean Syrah finish. Notes Export Manager Fernando Pavon, “a wine that avoids standardization.” 90

Estate Cabernet Sauvignon 2010 (LCBO $13.95, 262717, SAQ 262717, $14.95, B.C. 284125, $14.99) from Maipo fruit flaunts varietal typicity, plain and simple. Was bottled under screw cap back in 2003! A bissel of Cabernet Franc adds complexity by way of juicy currants, tart raspberries and caper berries. 87

Estate Sauvignon Blanc 2013 (LCBO 263574, $12.95, B.C. 286385, $13.99) is uniquely and markedly realized upwards out of schist soil from a high Aconcagua crop that required some necessary thinning. Decidedly pale yet spirited, like old school Marlborough. Sagacious Kiwi mineral salinity, lean, dry and grassy. Less herbiage, intensity and flesh than the Max Reserva and yet its steely, stainless character is better and VGV, especially at $13. 88

Max Cabernet Sauvignon Reserva 2011 (LCBO $18.95, 335174, SAQ 335174, $16.95, B.C. 287805, $16.99) is executed with more of a cooler and less New World approach than the chocolate, Cassis and easy drinking 2010. Here the smells are Cab Franc-ish, with more pyrazine, less mocha, more berries and it is coated by finer tannins. Mint, eucalyptus and purple fruit but not so much a riper style. More elegance, structure and balance. ”If you want to protect the Cabernet, you should do so with the leaves,” notes Baettig. The tartness of the fruit tells beneath the syrup. A confident wine made with some transparency, through indirect light, not with the hot Aconcagua sun burning on the fruit. 89

Max Reserva Syrah 2011 (LCBO $18.95, 614750, SAQ 864678, $18.95, B.C. 361311, 2010, $19.99) whiffs the most confounding nose of the line-up so far, cooler than the ’10 vintage, and very, very Northern Rhone. Bacon, smoked meat, juicy and spicy olive, dark but not woody, splintered or Java-scripted. The nose gets better and better and it shows good length. This is the 15th year of this wine. 89

Don Maximiano 2007 (LCBO 501247, $80, SAQ, 11396557, 2008, $79.25, B.C. 5012547, 2008, $$89.99) at the six year mark is showing extreme refinement and is not the California fruit bomb you might have been warned about. Tenuous teng, tang and verve, unique to place and mighty, mighty fine. Goes well beyond “all the sacred boundaries we’ve overgrown” to “build a brave new foundry close to home.” The 2009 is being released as the “Founder’s Reserve Cabernet” with touches of Syrah and Petit Verdot. That wine (tasted at Wines of Chile) will rewrite the Maximiano book. 91

Kai 2010 (Private Order, $144.95, SAQ 12051411, $116) charms, entertains and regales in spectacular aromatics. Currently in beast mode, this is rich, unctuous Carmenère. 2005 was this wine’s first vintage and here high-grained tannins will one day soften and round out in oak sweetness. For now there is some balsamic and spicy forest floor, which, says Baettig, “is part of the variety, so I try to keep it in the wine.” From alluvial, flat and thin soils, attacked by high sun exposure under less canopy. More fruit exposure leads to intensity. Long roots, rock, Carmenère. 93
my those sound nice, don't they...
but the smell of bullshit is also noticed in some of the descriptors...?
please, always remember that nice "bullshit "scale we offered previously...
it sure seems the author of the above reviews is using the same algorithm?
:idea:

In 2007, Richard E Quandt, a Princeton economics professor, published a paper entitled "On Wine Bullshit: Some New Software?" The study sought to describe the "unholy union" of "bullshit and bullshit artists who are impelled to comment on it", in this case wine and wine critics. Quandt compiled a "vocabulary of wine descriptors" containing 123 terms from "angular" to "violets" via other nonsense descriptions such as "fireplace" and "tannins, fine-grained".

Then, with the help of colleagues, he built an algorithm that generated wine reviews of hypothetical wines using his "vocabulary of bullshit". He concluded that whether his reviews were "any more bullshit" than real ones was a "judgment call". Sadly, he didn't explore how long it would take a monkey to type a wine review.
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 11, 2013 11:24 pm

It's all about the wine.

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 18, 2013 4:29 pm

Another friday choice....... great coastal pinot noir from Loma Larga.......... buy at the vineyard.....

http://chilecopadevino.com/2013/10/18/l ... vineyards/
It's all about the wine.

Vicki and Greg Lansen
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2275
Joined: Wed Sep 06, 2006 8:02 pm

Re: Wine of the week

Post by Vicki and Greg Lansen » Fri Oct 18, 2013 5:03 pm

nwdiver wrote:Another friday choice....... great coastal pinot noir from Loma Larga.......... buy at the vineyard.....

http://chilecopadevino.com/2013/10/18/l ... vineyards/

Only at vineyard? I will check at the specialty wine store for this for a friend

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 18, 2013 5:09 pm

Vicki and Greg Lansen wrote:
nwdiver wrote:Another friday choice....... great coastal pinot noir from Loma Larga.......... buy at the vineyard.....

http://chilecopadevino.com/2013/10/18/l ... vineyards/

Only at vineyard? I will check at the specialty wine store for this for a friend


......and distributed outside of Chile by Torres ;)
It's all about the wine.

zannder
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Aug 20, 2012 5:12 pm
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland

Re: Wine of the week

Post by zannder » Sat Oct 19, 2013 4:33 am

Call me a cheap skate but i am drinking this perfectly good Chilean red at just over 4000clp
Of course this is in the UK not Chile; the high end Chilean wines don't seem to have made much impact over here...folks spending that bit more, typically opt for NZ or French brands.
Maybe top class Chilean wines are missing a trick? Who knows?

http://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/asda-com ... 750ml.html

User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3130
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer
Contact:

Re: Wine of the week

Post by nwdiver » Fri Oct 25, 2013 2:32 pm

A product by Vina Estampa......... cheap and cheerful Carmenere


http://chilecopadevino.com/2013/10/25/e ... a-estampa/
It's all about the wine.

Post Reply