Strange Virus - HANTA!

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tombrad2
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by tombrad2 » Mon Jun 09, 2008 1:38 am

There was some cases of hanta virus in rural south of Chile some years ago, that concerned to people and it was wide covered in press, now is rare and every single case who happen it appear in TV and newspapers at national level, it is mot a common event. Chile is comparatively very safe on deadly animals: no sharks, deadly snakes, nor most of common dangerous species anywhere.

On corner spider they are not so dangerous, unless you step over one or one enter in your shirt or shoe by accident, they are extremely shy and normally hide from people, see one here http://www.dropshots.com/photos/243468/ ... 174501.jpg Those spiders have bad reputation but is odd to be bitten by one
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RWS
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by RWS » Mon Jun 09, 2008 2:24 am

admin wrote:. . . . As for the cornor spider, I think I have seen one in Temuco. We have a lot of spiders around the yard (most are just big and scary looking). I found if I blast the immediate area around the house about once or twice a year, their food moves back out in to the garden and all the spiders with them. I try to schedule my spraying when they are laying their eggs. Keeps the overall population for the year down to a manageable level, and I only have to spray once. . . .
When, approximately, is that, Charles?

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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by admin » Mon Jun 09, 2008 2:38 am

I believe it is in the Spring, but it is not marked on my calender. I just watch for the bloated females and their egg sacks to start appearing, then out comes the raid can for a good coverage of the outside of the house. Mostly they like to nest under our car port and garage area because it is out of the rain.

I give the whole sealing and area a good blast with the Raid spider formula (very good stuff), then leave for about 10 mins. When I come back there are a 100 or so dead spiders hanging from their threads that tried to leave, but never made it out. In a day or so I notice that all the rest have set up shop on our outer metal fence and bushes, which I am fine with. I hope it helps discourages people from trying to climb our fence.

We have a couple palm trees in our yard with a lot of bugs in the leaves. The spiders seem to like those more than anywhere else around our house.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by Louis » Fri Jun 13, 2008 2:55 pm

admin wrote:yea, in the southwest U.S. it is very very common, and everyone knows what to do about it. The cases are few and far between however, relative to a lot of other things.
Yeah, it was widespread and has been widespread, but remember back in the summer of 1993 when everyone kind of forgot about the Hanta virus and a mystery disease swept the the southwest? After many deaths, they finally figured out that it was hanta virus, a common disease that everyone in the southwest knows about. :twisted:

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Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by Gloria » Fri Mar 25, 2011 5:37 pm

I brought this thread forward to remind everyone of this continued threat. Two deaths and one seriously ill in Corral-Valdivia were recently reported. Be aware, be diligent. If you see Mickey Mouse wondering, get him!. Disneyworld is not moving to Chile.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by admin » Fri Mar 25, 2011 6:12 pm

yea, it likly killed more people last year (counting many that were probably never identified as being a victims) than the earthquake. Two carbinarios were at a mountain training facility a couple of months ago, and dropped dead in the middle of a run. They had been cleaning a cabin the day before. Most of the cases we have heard about (including one foreigner near Futa a couple of years ago) involved entering structures that had been closed for long periods of time. So, use full bio-hazard precautions when going in to that summer cabin or old woodshed. Open the doors, let it air out for several hours, then wear mask, gloves, and bring a spray bottle with lots of bleach. I suspect a lot of the cases happen in the summer months, not so much because that is the high season but as lots of people from Santiago are out poking around in their summer homes in jan and feb.

Hands down, a cat that can really catch mice (even if you do not like cats) is kind of standard piece of equipment in the rural areas. If for no other reason that micky mouse likes the taste of car wiring (seems more rats than mice), and other seriously expensive rubbers and plastics.

When we moved in to the house we are renting now, it was a summer vacation home. After the requisite precautions and having a cleaning crew go through the house, we moved our cat in. For the first 3 months she religiously dropped 1-2 mice at the back door every morning (she learned quickly never to show them to my wife) for me to plant in the backyard. A few hundred mice later, it is very rare that she catches any now. Perhaps one or two a month. We have never seen a live mouse anywhere near our dwelling. Our cat has moved on to rabbits and birds.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Fri Mar 25, 2011 7:11 pm

In Saskatchewan, Canada here.... My little brother's boss when he worked at Dairy Queen here back in the day died from Hanta Virus.... He was cleaning out a shed at the lake. Deer mice carry it here. A woman my gf works with, her husband got it 4 years ago. He survived but has neurological damage, all around tiredness, etc. When cleaning out areas where mice nest always use a mask as stated by admin. And that is a proper mask (as opposed to painters or dust mask (5 for 10 dollar type))....

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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by Gloria » Fri Mar 25, 2011 7:22 pm

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome: What You Need To Know

The deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) is the primary reservoir of the hantavirus that causes hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the United States.
TRANSMISSION

Infected rodents shed the virus through urine, droppings, and saliva. HPS is transmitted to humans through a process called aerosolization. Aerosolization occurs when dried materials contaminated by rodent excreta or saliva are disturbed. Humans become infected by breathing in these infectious aerosols.

HPS in the United States cannot be transmitted from one person to another.

HPS in the United States is not known to be transmitted by farm animals, dogs, or cats or from rodents purchased from a pet store.

RISK

Anything that puts you in contact with fresh rodent urine, droppings, saliva or nesting materials can place you at risk for infection.
VIRUS

Hantaviruses have been shown to be viable in the environment for 2 to 3 days at normal room temperature. The ultraviolet rays in sunlight kill hantaviruses.
PREVENTION

Rodent control in and around the home remains the primary strategy for preventing hantavirus infection.
CLEANING

Use a bleach solution or household disinfectant to effectively deactivate hantaviruses when cleaning rodent infestations.

What is hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS)?
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a deadly disease caused by hantaviruses. Rodents can transmit hantaviruses through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus.

Who is at risk of contracting HPS?
Anyone who comes into contact with rodents that carry hantavirus is at risk of HPS. Rodent infestation in and around the home remains the primary risk for hantavirus exposure. Even healthy individuals are at risk for HPS infection if exposed to the virus.

Which rodents are known to be carriers of hantavirus that cause HPS in humans?
In the United States, deer mice, cotton and rice rats (in the Southeast), and the white-footed mouse (in the Northeast), are the only known rodent carriers of hantaviruses causing HPS.

How is HPS transmitted?
Hantavirus is transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Individuals become infected with HPS after breathing fresh aerosolized urine, droppings, saliva, or nesting materials. Transmission can also occur when these materials are directly introduced into broken skin, the nose or the mouth. If a rodent with the virus bites someone, the virus may be spread to that person, but this type of transmission is rare.

Can you contract HPS from another person?
HPS in the United States cannot be transmitted from one person to another. You cannot get the virus from touching or kissing a person who has HPS or from a health care worker who has treated someone with the disease. In addition, you cannot contract the virus from a blood transfusion in which you receive blood from a person who survived HPS.

Can you contract HPS from other animals?
Hantaviruses that cause HPS in the United States are only known to be transmitted by certain species of rodents. HPS in the United States is not known to be transmitted by farm animals, dogs, or cats or from rodents purchased from a pet store.

How long can hantavirus remain infectious in the environment?
The length of time hantaviruses can remain infectious in the environment is variable and depends on environmental conditions, such as temperature and humidity, whether the virus is indoors or outdoors or exposed to the sun, and even on the rodent’s diet (which would affect the chemistry of its urine). Viability for 2 or 3 days has been shown at normal room temperature. Exposure to sunlight will decrease the time of viability, and freezing temperatures will actually increase the time that the virus remains viable. Since the survival of infectious virus is measured in terms of hours or days, only active infestations of infected rodents result in conditions that are likely to lead to human hantavirus infection.

How do I prevent HPS?
SEAL UP, TRAP UP, CLEAN UP
Seal up rodent entry holes or gaps with steel wool, lath metal, or caulk. Trap rats and mice by using an appropriate snap trap. Clean up rodent food sources and nesting sites and take precautions when cleaning rodent-infested areas. See the HPS Prevention Checklist for a complete listing.

What are the recommendations for cleaning a rodent-infested area?

Put on rubber, latex, vinyl or nitrile gloves.
Do not stir up dust by vacuuming, sweeping, or any other means.
Thoroughly wet contaminated areas with a bleach solution or household disinfectant.
Hypochlorite (bleach) solution: Mix 1 and ½ cups of household bleach in 1 gallon of water.
Once everything is wet, take up contaminated materials with damp towel and then mop or sponge the area with bleach solution or household disinfectant.
Spray dead rodents with disinfectant and then double-bag along with all cleaning materials. Bury, burn, or throw out rodent in appropriate waste disposal system. (Contact your local or state health department concerning other appropriate disposal methods.)
Disinfect gloves with disinfectant or soap and water before taking them off.
After taking off the clean gloves, thoroughly wash hands with soap and water (or use a waterless alcohol-based hand rub when soap is not available).
Can I use a vacuum with HEPA filter to clean up rodent-contaminated areas?
HEPA vacuums are not recommended since they blow air around and may create aerosols.

How do I clean papers, books, and delicate items?
Books, papers, and other items that cannot be cleaned with a liquid disinfectant or thrown away should be left outdoors in the sunlight for several hours or in an indoor area free of rodents for approximately 1 week before final cleaning. After that time, the virus should no longer be infectious. Wear rubber, latex, or vinyl gloves and wipe the items with a cloth moistened with disinfectant.

I do not want to bleach my clothes or stuffed animals; is there anything else I can do?
Wash clothing or stuffed animals in the washing machine using hot water and regular detergent. Laundry detergent can break down the virus’s lipid envelope, rendering it harmless. Machine dry laundry on a high setting or hang it to air dry in the sun. CDC does not recommend simply running the clothing through the dryer without washing first.

How do I clean rugs, carpets and upholstered furniture?
Disinfect carpets and upholstered furniture with a disinfectant or with a commercial-grade steam cleaner or shampoo.

What precautions should I take if I think I have been exposed to hantavirus?
If you have been exposed to rodents or rodent infestations and have symptoms of fever, deep muscle aches, and severe shortness of breath, see your doctor immediately. Inform your doctor of possible rodent exposure so that he/she is alerted to the possibility of rodent-borne diseases, such as HPS.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by Gloria » Fri Mar 25, 2011 7:26 pm

Hantavirus
Hantavirus is a disease spread by rodents that is similar to the flu.

Causes
Hantavirus has probably caused people to get sick for years in the United States, but it was not recognized until recently.

In 1993 there was an outbreak of fatal respiratory illness on an Indian reservation at the border of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Researchers discovered that hantavirus caused the epidemic. Since that discovery, hantavirus disease has been reported in every western state, and in many eastern states.

Hantavirus is carried by rodents, especially deer mice. The virus is in their urine and feces, but it does not make the carrier animal sick. Humans are thought to become infected when they are exposed to contaminated dust from mice nests or droppings.

The disease is not passed between humans. People may encounter contaminated dust when cleaning long-empty homes, sheds, or other enclosed areas.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that rodents carrying hantavirus have been found in at least twenty national parks. The CDC says it is possible that the virus is in all of the parks.

The CDC suspects that campers and hikers may be more likely to catch the disease than most people. This is because they pitch tents on the forest floor and lay their sleeping bags down in musty cabins.

So far, however, only a couple of cases have been directly linked to camping or hiking. Most people who are exposed to the virus have come in contact with rodent droppings in their own homes.

Symptoms
The early symptoms of hantavirus disease are flu-like (fever, chills, muscle aches). For a very short period of time, the infected person starts to feel better. Then, within 1 - 2 days, the person may develop shortness of breath. The disease gets worse quickly and leads to respiratory failure.

Other symptoms may include:

Dry cough
General ill feeling (malaise)
Headache
Nausea and vomiting
Rapid shallow breathing
Exams and Tests
A doctor may notice signs of:

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)
Decreased blood pressure (hypotension)
Decreased levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxia), causing the skin to have a bluish color (cyanosis)
Kidney failure
Tests include:

Complete blood count (CBC)
Hematocrit
Liver enzymes
Platelet count
Serological testing for hantavirus
Serum albumin
Serum chemistry
X-ray of the chest
Treatment
An effective treatment for hantavirus infection involving the lungs is not yet available.

Hantavirus hemorrhagic fever that involves the kidneys (with renal syndrome) does respond to treatment with ribavirin given through a vein (intravenously). This medication shortens the illness and reduces the risk of death.

Treatment must be given in the hospital. Often patients are admitted to an intensive care unit.

Oxygen therapy is used. Blood gases are closely monitored. Severe cases will need respiratory support with a breathing tube (endotracheal tube) and ventilator.

Outlook (Prognosis)
Hantavirus is a serious infection. Even with aggressive treatment, more than half of the cases are fatal.

Possible Complications
Cardiorespiratory failure
Death
Kidney failure
When to Contact a Medical Professional
Call your health care provider if you develop flu-like symptoms after being exposed to mouse urine or feces (excreta), or dust that may have been contaminated with mouse excreta.

Prevention
Avoid exposure to rodent urine and feces.

When hiking and camping, pitch tents in areas where there are no rodent droppings.
Avoid rodent dens.
Drink disinfected water.
Sleep on a ground cover and pad.
Keep your home clean. Clear out potential nesting sites and clean your kitchen.
If you must work in an area where contact with rodent urine and feces is possible, follow these recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):

When opening an unused cabin, shed, or other building, open all the doors and windows, leave the building, and allow the space to air out for 30 minutes.
Return to the building and spray the surfaces, carpet, and other areas with a disinfectant. Leave the building for another 30 minutes.
Spray mouse nests and droppings with a 10% solution of chlorine bleach or similar disinfectant. Allow it to sit for 30 minutes. Using rubber gloves, place the materials in plastic bags. Seal the bags and throw them in the trash or an incinerator. Dispose of gloves and cleaning materials in the same way.
Wash all potentially contaminated hard surfaces with a bleach or disinfectant solution. Avoid vacuuming until the area has been thoroughly decontaminated. Then, vacuum the first few times with enough ventilation. Surgical masks may provide some protection.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by no country for young men » Fri Mar 25, 2011 9:18 pm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002358/

mask, good ventilation, gloves, bleach and more bleach.

When cleaning up infected areas where mice have been present a long time, apparently the virus is present in the dust from crystalized urine too. So tons of bleach, repeat a few times after it dries again. Would be careful of the exhaust from a vac cleaner used in clean up. I've done a lot of cleanup like this and got some religion after hearing of a person here who was infected doing the same.

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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by admin » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:04 pm

My cat is for rent. She will put down anything from mice to small pumas.

I think an increase in cases this time of year is natural as people and mice both try to get out of the rain, and people start going into places like wood sheds that they have not been in to all summer.
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Re: Strange Virus - HANTA!

Post by admin » Wed Apr 27, 2011 7:24 pm

That is a bit strange about the hospital. As I understand it is not communicable between people, at least easily. The source would have had to be something in the hospital.
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