Looking for the best City for my Family

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Britkid
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Britkid » Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:02 pm

It says the cost of education increased 13% in 2018, in that one year, and 23.8% in Santiago. Looks high. Does that look correct. Why would that happen?
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

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fraggle092
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by fraggle092 » Tue Feb 26, 2019 10:57 am

Britkid wrote:
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:02 pm
Why would that happen?
One of the results of the last government's attempt to quitar los patines....
People who follow the turgid local news will get that reference:
“A partir del año 2018, debido a que el gobierno quitará la subvención de una vez, las familias se verán obligadas a pagar la diferencia, es decir, el arancel total, también de una vez. Por ello, la mensualidad deberá ser pagada cubriendo la parte de la subvención que se despoja, desde el primer mes”, precisa.
Fuente: Diario el Día - http://www.diarioeldia.cl/region/educac ... es-pagados

For explanation only. Have absolutely no intention to elaborate. This issue is a shit magnet.
Après moi, le déluge

Britkid
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Britkid » Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:34 pm

Thanks for this.

One thing that confuses me still - and I'm easily confused about Chilean politics due to a lack of knowledge on the subject - is that the link you provided suggests that this change was implement before Pinera won, is it more of a legacy of the Bachelet era? Would a left wing government reduce public education and make it more private and expensive? That doesn't seem right.

Perhaps someone else can explain that one, if you don't feel a need to elaborate.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

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admin
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by admin » Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:03 pm

i'll give this a go, but will probably get it wrong.

prior to bachelet's glorious education reform there was basically:

free public schools, that was crap and is still crap.

there was, semi-private / public schools. kind of charter schools, with gov subsidy. a mixed bag quality wise. lots of crapy schools built just to get the subsidy, but it did give even poor families chance to send their kids to something a bit better than the public schools. it also created more education options in areas that had no public schools, such as rural areas.

fully private schools, subject to full market, however as i understand they could get subsidies based on need of the student so middle class for instance had access.

with the new reform, they eliminated the middle option. mostly forcing schools to fully private or go out of biz.
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41southchile
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by 41southchile » Wed Feb 27, 2019 8:17 am

Britkid wrote:
Mon Feb 25, 2019 10:02 pm
It says the cost of education increased 13% in 2018, in that one year, and 23.8% in Santiago. Looks high. Does that look correct. Why would that happen?
Sounds possible, I know most parents here now pay aprox 50 percent more for school now than just 5 years ago. Why would it happen? Because they can, it's not like schools compete on a price difference, quite the opposite actually, like many things people mistakenly associate price with quality. Put your price up, then your school must be a good one creating more demand. There is some justification for some rises as costs gave gone up, but 23.8 percent yoy is just a joke, that's the education system here.
In the Lakes Region Chile for 6 years. It looks like New Zealand in some ways, and is nearly at the bottom of the world too, but there the similarities end.

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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by admin » Wed Feb 27, 2019 10:43 am

yea, keep in mind that is costs for people with a monthly income of $10,000 u.s. a month or more in that abc1 catagory, from what i recall (think it is like 6 million a month).

would be interesting to see a breakdown by social groups.
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Jamers41
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Jamers41 » Wed Feb 27, 2019 11:29 am

HybridAmbassador wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 4:15 pm
Jamers41 wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 12:42 pm
scandinavian wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 12:35 pm
Atlanta wrote:
Fri Feb 22, 2019 8:18 am
I am leaving The States for 2-3 years and looking for a great city for my family. I have a wife, 2 kids that both speak Spanish decently well (the oldest near fluent), and are looking for a coastal (scenic if possible), mid-sized city with a good school for our kids and access to good health care. I have a TEFL cert and plan to teach English. Cultural amenities such as restaurants, cafes would be a huge plus as well.

Any advice? Vina Del Mar seemed to check many of the boxes at first glance.
Not sure what the going rate is as an English teacher, but I am doubtful it will be enough to provide you with what you expect. I think most English teachers here are single, straight out of college guys / girls that can manage on a limited income. Other posters probably know more about the this?
Good schools & health care is not cheap. Without knowing for certain, I would assume Santiago to be the best place jobwise, but that is not coastal.
Having done that before, I would generally agree that you cannot raise a family with the income generated only from teaching ESL. Unless you have a side hustle, something is off. If you are coming after having built up a bit of savings and are single, you could probably swing it for a year or so like I did. Otherwise, you need to re-check your math. Are you going to somehow be supporting a family of four with 500 000 CLP monthly? Cultural amenities, or not, will be the least of your concerns at an income level that low.
$500.000 CLP for a month salary worth of teaching English? That is around US$700 ish! Is that misery salary per month to teach English? I thought the market was around US$1000~1200 at least! Then for the OP, Chile is not for you to feed your family Am afraid...
Well the exchange rate is not what it was several years ago, so yeah 500k is close to $800 USD. I was paid 6.000 CLP per teaching hour for an institute back in 2011-2012.......of which 10% went to the government when issuing the boleta of course (which would then be refunded the next year since I wasn't voluntarily putting into an AFP or whatever). At 20 or 25 class hours per week, it's in the neighborhood of 500k per month. In my experience you could basically double the number of weekly class hours to determine how much you really worked, because obviously you have to spend some time preparing for classes, unless you happen to have a more advanced student and they are supposed to be just "conversation sessions" for their practice. Speaking of which, that's about the best scenario you could have, having your own private students (not with an institute as the middleman) and charging them directly 10.000 per hour or more, and if they are at an advanced level and only want conversation practice (no assignments, tests, scoring, etc) then that's easier. If you have an established clientele of several students who you give classes to directly, because you have a good reputation, and charge them directly, then in theory you could pull in 800k per month or perhaps 1 million. Even so, you will be bored and losing money in Jan & Feb when Chileans go on vacation, and wouldn't have any benefits (no Isapre for you). It's not something to sustain a family with.

Britkid
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Britkid » Wed Feb 27, 2019 3:16 pm

OK, thanks for the comments/explanations about the schools.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

California
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by California » Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:05 pm

You could try La Serena-Coquimbo, about a 5 hour drive north of Santiago. It has a population of around 400,000, is on the coast, has a mild climate, hospitals, schools, universities, restaurants, a small colonial center with lots of newer suburban and beachfront development.

My wife is Chilean and we lived there with our children for a year. It was a great experience. We still visit regularly and we were just there in January. We put them in a semi-private school (subvencionado), for 3rd, 7th, and 11th grades. They are changing the school system and it is my understanding that the subvencionados are being eliminated, so you will probably have to find a private school. I'm not sure how the change is playing out.

Here is the good side: Chile is a beautiful country and the people are great. We made great friends with the parents' of our kids classmates. Corruption is minimal and you can trust the police. Prices are almost always posted so you don't feel like you are paying the "gringo" price. You can use your credit/debit card for most purchase and ATMs for the times you need cash. In general it is an easy place to live, especially compared to other Latin American countries.

Here is the downside: As with any place, nothing is perfect. There are two housing variables that need more weight in Chile than in the US: security and noise. Chile is safe, compared to other Latin American countries, but burglaries and theft are more common than most places in the US. When looking for housing, get an apartment with a doorman (conserge) and a unit above the first or second floor. If you get a house, find one in a gated community (condominio cerrado). We were burglarized, as was another US family we knew, as was just about every other Chilean we know. When you get to Chile, just note the barred windows, spiked walls and fences, and even electrified perimeter fences.

With noise, just be aware that Chilean culture is very nocturnal. The nightly news is at 9:00. Parties and even barbecues start around midnight and can easily go until 5 or 6 in the morning. If you have an apartment with a shared wall you will hear that all night. That same goes if you have a house and your neighbors next door or behind you have a get-together. And this in not just college kids; middle aged people and elderly do the same. We are hoping to buy an apartment in La Serena someday, but I only want an upstairs unit with a master bedroom that does not share a wall with any other unit. If noise doesn't bother you or you are nocturnal as well, then it is less of an issue.

Good luck! It can be a great experience for you and the kids.

Atlanta
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Atlanta » Mon Mar 11, 2019 8:28 am

California wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:05 pm
You could try La Serena-Coquimbo, about a 5 hour drive north of Santiago. It has a population of around 400,000, is on the coast, has a mild climate, hospitals, schools, universities, restaurants, a small colonial center with lots of newer suburban and beachfront development.

My wife is Chilean and we lived there with our children for a year. It was a great experience. We still visit regularly and we were just there in January. We put them in a semi-private school (subvencionado), for 3rd, 7th, and 11th grades. They are changing the school system and it is my understanding that the subvencionados are being eliminated, so you will probably have to find a private school. I'm not sure how the change is playing out.

Here is the good side: Chile is a beautiful country and the people are great. We made great friends with the parents' of our kids classmates. Corruption is minimal and you can trust the police. Prices are almost always posted so you don't feel like you are paying the "gringo" price. You can use your credit/debit card for most purchase and ATMs for the times you need cash. In general it is an easy place to live, especially compared to other Latin American countries.

Here is the downside: As with any place, nothing is perfect. There are two housing variables that need more weight in Chile than in the US: security and noise. Chile is safe, compared to other Latin American countries, but burglaries and theft are more common than most places in the US. When looking for housing, get an apartment with a doorman (conserge) and a unit above the first or second floor. If you get a house, find one in a gated community (condominio cerrado). We were burglarized, as was another US family we knew, as was just about every other Chilean we know. When you get to Chile, just note the barred windows, spiked walls and fences, and even electrified perimeter fences.

With noise, just be aware that Chilean culture is very nocturnal. The nightly news is at 9:00. Parties and even barbecues start around midnight and can easily go until 5 or 6 in the morning. If you have an apartment with a shared wall you will hear that all night. That same goes if you have a house and your neighbors next door or behind you have a get-together. And this in not just college kids; middle aged people and elderly do the same. We are hoping to buy an apartment in La Serena someday, but I only want an upstairs unit with a master bedroom that does not share a wall with any other unit. If noise doesn't bother you or you are nocturnal as well, then it is less of an issue.

Good luck! It can be a great experience for you and the kids.
Thanks Cal. I will give SLC a chance.

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fraggle092
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by fraggle092 » Mon Mar 11, 2019 9:54 am

California wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:05 pm

With noise, just be aware that Chilean culture is very nocturnal. The nightly news is at 9:00. Parties and even barbecues start around midnight and can easily go until 5 or 6 in the morning.
And watch TV until 2 am every night.
The same people that complain about alterations in sleep rhythms caused by a one hour clock change.
Not that I approve of that either.
Après moi, le déluge

Gloria
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Re: Looking for the best City for my Family

Post by Gloria » Mon Mar 11, 2019 1:22 pm

fraggle092 wrote:
Mon Mar 11, 2019 9:54 am
California wrote:
Sun Mar 03, 2019 4:05 pm

With noise, just be aware that Chilean culture is very nocturnal. The nightly news is at 9:00. Parties and even barbecues start around midnight and can easily go until 5 or 6 in the morning.
And watch TV until 2 am every night.
The same people that complain about alterations in sleep rhythms caused by a one hour clock change.
Not that I approve of that either.
:lol:
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

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