Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

All things related to Moving to Chile, tips, tricks, FAQS. Here is where to exchange information between those that have already moved and those planning to move to Chile so you do not need to learn the hard way. Please also check Living in Chile forum for related information.
BrendaandTed
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Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by BrendaandTed » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:04 pm

Hi,
Let me introduce ourselves, Steve aka Ted, and Brenda.
Over the coming days I will digest all the information on this board, but there are few issues which I ought to air because they will stop things in their tracks - so I apologise if there are already answers elsewhere but if anyone can comment on these concerns I would be grateful.

We are both coming from the UK, me 63 and Bren 51. That's the main issue.
Let me hasten to say we are both hard working and I for one do not intend retiring anytime soon.
I work in the construction industry (back office stuff) and Bren can turn her talents to anything.
We do have a certain amount of money - by no means a pension but, we both would wish to work in order to fund/prepare for that.
What sounds a good idea right now is starting up a business, like opening an Indian restaurant or importing produce, Indian tea for example. (our daughter works in India).

The other thing is that I would be concerned about is the availability of medicines. I have two stable conditions; high blood pressure and diabetes. The meds I am on (and have been for several years) are readily available in the UK. I understand more prescription meds are available in your pharmacies than in the UK, would this availability be true for the meds for these conditions?

Regards,

steve

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Space Cat
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by Space Cat » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:54 pm

Welcome!
What sounds a good idea right now is starting up a business, like opening an Indian restaurant or importing produce, Indian tea for example. (our daughter works in India).
Sorry, it sounds like a very risky idea.

Starting a small business with a limited budget is a hard task on its own and you want to add to this:
– the immigration load: moving, settling down, buying necessary stuff, obtaining residency
– learning to speak in another language (you're not fluent in Spanish, right?)
– not knowing the Chilean market and consumer behavior
– in case of restaurant: managing workers from another culture + in another language + managing contractors + learning tons of business-related laws and regulations

A wild guess: with your experience in construction and native English you probably can find a translator job in the Chilean construction industry because you know many specific things and terms there.

Gloria
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by Gloria » Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:13 pm

Don't bother, stay home. Things are not so bad in the UK. The grass is not greener on the other side!
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

Britkid
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Jan 16, 2017 3:36 pm

You'll earn a lot less money here probably, and take a long time to get anywhere without contacts.

On the plus side, Chile, or at least Santiago, is well advanced in terms of hospitals, medicines, pharmacies, I have never struggled to find anything anyway or had bad service, and there is always shipping, (you may find work and earning money harder, and getting medicines easier) however you better check in advance for the specific things you need.

I think any time you move to another country there is always going to be a lot of hassle and negative points, and difficulties, and annoyances you're not used to, so you want to be very adventurous and resourceful, or have very good reasons or major advantages for coming here.

Don't jump hard into the deep end before learning how to swim. That is to say, for instance, do not purchase a plot of land the month after you arrive, and burn bridges with people in the UK.

Instead, tell contacts in the UK that you are going to live in Chile for a few months as a try out, but haven't committed yet. Keep a fund of money that never goes even remotely close to zero, allows for some unexpected disasters. Rent not buy when you first land here.

In other words, if things turn to sh1t, make it easy to be able to leave.

Also bring some things with you to smooth the transition. Bring 6 months of medicines for instance so you don't have to worry about that for a while after getting here.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

paladin
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by paladin » Mon Jan 16, 2017 5:10 pm

We are a retired couple from the UK. I agree completely with the other comments, ie forget completely about starting up any kind of business. Also in Chile, we can get imported speciality items, and even baked beans and branston chutney. There are a variety of Indian restaurants also.
With regard to medicines, what you should be concerning yourself with is not their availability, but their prices ! You have a big advantage living in the UK. Think also about paying for medical care, which is excellent and not free ! Your UK govt pension will be frozen forever at the amount you are receiving when leaving the UK.
Chile is a lovely place to live if you have money, but not if you dont. Come out for a holiday before you make any moves.

HybridAmbassador
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by HybridAmbassador » Mon Jan 16, 2017 5:24 pm

Thinking the OP is getting prepared to exit GB when Brexit is in place. When EU approve the exiting agreement placed by GB, things will get not too comfy for Britons. GB did not want a free-passage of into Britain for any EU member country citizens.
But for GB to keep associating with EU as if still a member country, it has to adhere to EU mandate and accept anyone entering the UK and getting a well paid job so to be. The UK is seen with envy from, especially the eastern EU participant citizens. Very soon for England things will become a little too uncomfortable so many are planning to exit the Brexited GB sooner or later..Billhere, where are you ?
HybridAmbassador. Toyota Hybrid system for helping climate change.

Rhodolite
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by Rhodolite » Mon Jan 16, 2017 6:44 pm

Don't forget to include the cost of health insurance in your calculations.

Gloria
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by Gloria » Mon Jan 16, 2017 7:18 pm

paladin wrote: Your UK govt pension will be frozen forever at the amount you are receiving when leaving the UK.
Really! :shock: I had no idea!
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

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fraggle092
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by fraggle092 » Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:45 pm

You have to be young(ish), naive and optimistic to think about coming here "cold"
And hopefully living on income being generated somewhere else.
Trying to make a living here is a big PITA for numerous reasons.
And outside Santiago, the quality of healthcare is highly variable, but uniformly expensive, not forgetting the 19% VAT on all medicines.
Après moi, le déluge

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David_Bro
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by David_Bro » Tue Jan 17, 2017 3:57 am

There are more speeds actually but for you there are really only three to concern yourself about for now, CITY, TOWN and COUNTRY depending where you buy or rent----The CITY speed is, on the upside, culture, health services and community, in equal parts but also treacherous because of transportation, theft and to degree, annonominity and just being a part of the horde. Business could be good if you are the only one doing what you plan to do and in my opinion a Indian restaurant will not get you there. If you do have a niche for business it won't be too long and someone with better connections will take over your market and you will be done. TOWN is on the upside, community, culture and health services depending where you are. The downside is that any business you come up with will be for not----don't even try it---the market will pay less for less quality product before they ever pay a little more that is even twice the value. COUNTRY is culture, community and health services, again depending on where you are. To be clear, I would not make a move unless you have at least 30k usd clear in cash to get your self out----you can stay in Chile for 2 or 10 years but it will still take you another 2 years to get out once you have left with selling property, car and furniture and other encubrances, etc----and it would be almost be better to just burn it all for the money and heartache it will cost you when you leave.

Chile, while being a part of a continent, is still an island culture geographically and socially and you are not a part of it but something that has just washed ashore to be pulled apart for what's of value and you are simply allowed to wash away with the tide and you are gone. Relationships are not what you are used too in the UK and will take you years to comprehend the finer points to succeed in any way socially, economically and culturally----You are simply a single Roman citizen with no army or power and, while a novelty at first, you will end your life just being pulled apart or milked like a cow due for slaughter at some point anyway----SO NO ONE CARES what happens to you.

There was a time, as late as maybe 2005, when you could get into Chile and it could pay off for staying and getting out with at least as much as you put it at the start----but those days are long gone----Thats not to say that if you had a lot of money, so say 5 million US to start where you could leverage a growing market and make your way but still, competition would catch up with you fast and in a few days you would loose it all if not very shrewd in business. From your post, you sound like a humble couple in your latter years and looking for something to coast into the finish just with what you have and making a little to offset what retirement and saved funds you have-----Point blank, NOT A GOOD IDEA for what Chile has to offer you in this respect so you are really better off staying home----you will save yourself at least 60 to 100k in usd for the in and the out it will cost you.

Its not to say that no one has made it in Chile but it takes an exceptional person in character and life outlook to do it and I mean EXCEPTIONAL and not too far just a handful of people that can do it with any medium of success in Chile----Language skills in part and A LOT OF MONEY as well as an extreme sense of/in CULTURAL awareness where every day is completely different and all the rules change from the morning and what the day has started out as and how it will end when you climb into to bed---and then it all changes again the next day much like a child would tip over the game board and you have to start all over again----but EVERY DAY.

Now, if you were say a retired US Firefighter with a guaranteed pension of 10k a month with a very small world experience and no concept of how much it would cost you every month and looking for adventure and a completely NEW experience, you could do it and if it did not work out or you grew tired before moving back---then go for it----but if you think Chile is your Oregon Trail where you stake your claim within a new frontier and all your hard work will pay off for your future or DNA inheritance, forget it, its not going to happen and it will only end in heartache and wonder as you think about how you are going to start over in the UK.

###

BrendaandTed
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Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 10:36 am

Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by BrendaandTed » Tue Jan 17, 2017 6:54 am

Hi,
First off, thanks to all for taking the time to write.
I suppose your sentiments are best summed up by the last paragraph above 'it's no Oregon trail'.
Funnily enough (or is it a coincidence) I'm currently reading a couple of books on that subject.?
I do appreciate all your comments and obviously will take stock. Personally I feel that the UK is going downhill rapidly - just one example is the paucity of new build civil engineering projects, so much Nimby-ism!
I do think I still may come over for a holiday in the coming months, but I've no delusions of more than scratching the surface of how life is in Chile.

Thanks again,

steve

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fraggle092
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Re: Newbies thinking of moving to Chile

Post by fraggle092 » Tue Jan 17, 2017 10:14 am

BrendaandTed wrote:I do appreciate all your comments and obviously will take stock. Personally I feel that the UK is going downhill rapidly - just one example is the paucity of new build civil engineering projects, so much Nimby-ism!
And then you have the nanny/spy state as well....from today's Independent
Woman fined £80 for pouring her coffee down a drain

A pensioner was fined £80 for pouring a cup of coffee down the drain.
Sue Peckitt, 65, said she got rid of the coffee because she didn't like the taste, and poured it away because she did not want to fill up a bin with liquid.
But she said she was then approached by three litter enforcement workers near the Ealing Broadway Centre in London who followed her to the bin an issued her an on-the-spot fine.
Après moi, le déluge

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