Legalizing Documents

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wiscondinavian
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by wiscondinavian » Tue Aug 23, 2016 10:50 am

Gloria wrote:
wiscondinavian wrote: after I called the Chilean DMV 10 times with my super-gringa accent, no one bothered to suggest that I'd need my degree (which I made clear was from the US) needed to be translated until I actually showed up.
What degree did they ask you to bring? You just need an 8th grade education so what degree you are talking about?. Obviously you were given once again the wrong information.

Gloria, I asked if my university degree already signed and notarized by everyone and their mother was sufficient proof to show that I passed 8th grade. Luckily, they accepted the fact of having a university degree as proof that I have passed the 8th grade. I have a high school diploma, but as far as I know, there's nothing in the state of Wisconsin that legally "proves" that I passed the 8th grade and didn't skip straight to high school.

Gloria
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by Gloria » Tue Aug 23, 2016 11:15 am

wiscondinavian wrote:
Gloria wrote:
wiscondinavian wrote: after I called the Chilean DMV 10 times with my super-gringa accent, no one bothered to suggest that I'd need my degree (which I made clear was from the US) needed to be translated until I actually showed up.
What degree did they ask you to bring? You just need an 8th grade education so what degree you are talking about?. Obviously you were given once again the wrong information.

Gloria, I asked if my university degree already signed and notarized by everyone and their mother was sufficient proof to show that I passed 8th grade. Luckily, they accepted the fact of having a university degree as proof that I have passed the 8th grade. I have a high school diploma, but as far as I know, there's nothing in the state of Wisconsin that legally "proves" that I passed the 8th grade and didn't skip straight to high school.
Wisc, it proves over and over again how overwhelming ignorance is in this country. Also depends and a lot has to do where you go to obtain the DL. Hubby had a worn out "unnotarized" and "unblessed" diploma showing that he was not "a child left behind by the school bus" and without any questions he went thru with the process......the key was not to do it in a city but a small town.......tadaa'.
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Tue Aug 23, 2016 12:13 pm

wiscondinavian wrote:Yeah, except my consulate told me that you had to have an ongoing flight to enter Chile as a tourist (not true at the time, no idea about now).

They actually refused to validate or tell me if the information from TIMATIC was accurate or erroneous. At the time it stated:
"- Visitors not holding return/onward tickets could be refused entry.
- Not applicable to holders of a credit card or sufficient funds to purchase a ticket, provided traveling as tourist."
That specific exempt or not applicable line was deleted a couple years back. But the provision of proof of sufficient funds (specifics also deleted) still applies. Never asked by Chile immigrations during my nearly 10 years on a rotating tourist visa about onward travel or proof of funds. Airlines on the other hand, yeah they can be assholes unless you know how to deal with them.
wiscondinavian wrote:They also provided me with gems such as you can't process a student visa when in Chile (definitely not true as several of my classmates did exactly that.)

So, yes, grain of salt from forumites, grain of salt from Consulates. Chilean bureaucrats are still Chilean bureaucrats even if they live in a different country.
Yes again for their claim that you cannot apply for a visa within the country and must jump through their idiotic police, medical and other hoops and apply at the consulate or embassy beforehand or that their exists nearly a dozen types of visas, etc. Remember, they represent the alternative visa process via the Ministry of Foreign Relations and thus are ignorant of the inside of Chile functioning of Extranjería.


I have more than once denigrated on the TA forum the incorrect or misleading info given out to tourists and travelers by the Chile consulates and embassies. On the other hand, they probably do support overseas chilenos adequately vs. the US DOS and US expatriates and travelers.
Generally, just a SPAM KILLER. You are on your own in this forum. My personal mission here is done.

BUT when necessary, by way of ridicule and truth revelation we shalt do war.

--eeuunikkeiexpat

Gloria
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by Gloria » Tue Aug 23, 2016 1:26 pm

I must say after reading what to me is totally incomprehensible that in my case the Chilean Consulate in Philadelphia deserves my highest respect for their professionalism when I asked them several questions and started from 0 with my documentation. All checked accurately!
So the moral to the story is.....line up 10 immigration workers with your own questions, if 2 or more match then possibly maybe the right answer, hold your breath, say a prayer, flip a coin and hope for the best. The rest is just bullshit!
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

Enzo
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by Enzo » Tue Nov 01, 2016 9:15 am

I just called the Chicago consulate yesterday to verify the process for legalizing my university diplomas from Wisconsin. She told me that the notarized and apostilled by the State documents are now accepted by Chile and the documents no longer have to go through the consulate of jurisdiction first. This was contradictory to what was written on the website. Good news!

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Eric
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by Eric » Fri Jan 13, 2017 8:58 am

Hello everyone,

I am in Chile and am applying for residency again. We lost our permanencias because we've been out of the country for 8 years. The man at the local Gobernacion told me that I needed my kids' birth certificates legalized by the Chilean consulate in Chicago. (I don't require needing this the first time I applied.) This, of course would delay my application by 3 or more weeks. My cursory reading of the Hague Convention indicates that a state certification should be acceptable. An authentication by the Secretary of State of a state-issued birth certificate seems redundant. Can anyone point me to something definitive stating that the legalization of a state-issued birth certificate is not required? Thanks for your help.

frozen-north
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by frozen-north » Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:18 am

May be admin has some update, but if he was correct it is still too early in 2017.
admin wrote: Mon Feb 15, 2016

I still would tell everyone that is planning to do anything in 2016 in Chile, to go through the old document legalization process until well in to 2017 (at the very least).

By 2017, we will have a much better handle on just how widely accepted the apostille is in Chile on the ground, day to day, practical level. Let me put it this way. If you have the debate about apostille vs. old legalization process, it means the document was too important to risk on having it rejected (contracts, immigration, etc).

http://www.allchile.net/chileforum/view ... 24#p161887

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admin
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by admin » Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:28 am

Just the apostil is needed, and anyone working at immigration should know that by now.

More obscure beucratic processes or offices mught still not gotten the memo, but immigration should know it by now all over the country.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

mbrady7411
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by mbrady7411 » Sat Jan 14, 2017 11:42 am

I am a new user and this is my first posting so please forgive me if some of my questions on the immigration process seem a bit off point. I will be moving to La Serena on March 2 and I will be applying for a temporary non-working retirement visa. No one else will be with me. I have become increasingly concerned about exactly what documents are actually required (ie. what constitutes "medical records') and what kind of "approvals" are needed before leaving the US.

I've noticed both my Secretary of State and the US Department of State offer "authentication" services, apparently only for documents originating at the state and federal levels, respectively. In light of Chile becoming a signatory to the Hague Convention, I assume these are substitutes for 'apostilles." Do I really need these services? And for which documents?

Many of the articles I've read on this subject contradict each other and I haven't been able to find a definitive source for either the process or the
materials required.

Here's what I have done or am in the process of doing so far:

Notarized copies of marriage and divorce certificates
Notarized copies of will and powers of attorney
Notarized copies of bank statements (Oct., Nov. & Dec.)
Notarized statement of pension income
Notarized statements of investment funds
Notarized copy of State Architect's license
Notarized copy of "National" Architect's license (NCARB)
Letter from my doctor attesting to my current state of health
Reservation for temporary residence in La Serena

In process:

Copies of all passport pages
Waiting for copy of medical records going back 2 years
Waiting for notarized copies of birth certificate
International driver's license
Cover letter explaining why I want to live in Chile

To be obtained upon arrival in Chile:

Tourist visa
2 x 3 cm photos

Questionable items:

Police report?
Full medical records or just a letter from my doctor?
School records?
Diplomas?
3 years of tax returns?
Anything else?

Most of the items in the first list above have already been translated into Spanish by someone I trust.

Any information on these matters would be greatly appreciated.

Gloria
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by Gloria » Sat Jan 14, 2017 1:28 pm

mbrady7411 wrote:I am a new user and this is my first posting so please forgive me if some of my questions on the immigration process seem a bit off point. I will be moving to La Serena on March 2 and I will be applying for a temporary non-working retirement visa. No one else will be with me. I have become increasingly concerned about exactly what documents are actually required (ie. what constitutes "medical records') and what kind of "approvals" are needed before leaving the US.

I've noticed both my Secretary of State and the US Department of State offer "authentication" services, apparently only for documents originating at the state and federal levels, respectively. In light of Chile becoming a signatory to the Hague Convention, I assume these are substitutes for 'apostilles." Do I really need these services? And for which documents?

Many of the articles I've read on this subject contradict each other and I haven't been able to find a definitive source for either the process or the
materials required.

Here's what I have done or am in the process of doing so far:

Notarized copies of marriage and divorce certificates
Notarized copies of will and powers of attorney
Notarized copies of bank statements (Oct., Nov. & Dec.)
Notarized statement of pension income
Notarized statements of investment funds
Notarized copy of State Architect's license
Notarized copy of "National" Architect's license (NCARB)
Letter from my doctor attesting to my current state of health
Reservation for temporary residence in La Serena

In process:

Copies of all passport pages
Waiting for copy of medical records going back 2 years
Waiting for notarized copies of birth certificate
International driver's license
Cover letter explaining why I want to live in Chile

To be obtained upon arrival in Chile:

Tourist visa
2 x 3 cm photos

Questionable items:

Police report?
Full medical records or just a letter from my doctor?
School records?
Diplomas?
3 years of tax returns?
Anything else?

Most of the items in the first list above have already been translated into Spanish by someone I trust.

Any information on these matters would be greatly appreciated.

You've notarized just about everything there is......now you need the Pope's blessing with a US$ 1000 offering attached to the documents.....( just kidding) Police records will show up with your passport.....(have you been naughty or nice?) School records only your eight grade diploma if you want to get your driving permit. No tax returns. No need for full medical records.
I'm from the generation of common sense, wisdom and unfiltered answers. I sayeth as I seeth.

mbrady7411
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 11:16 am

Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by mbrady7411 » Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:27 am

Bless you Gloria. Your answer helped me a lot.
Can anyone else answer my questions on which documents are required for state and/or federal authentication?

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Legalizing Documents

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Sun Jan 15, 2017 12:09 pm

Generally, just a SPAM KILLER. You are on your own in this forum. My personal mission here is done.

BUT when necessary, by way of ridicule and truth revelation we shalt do war.

--eeuunikkeiexpat

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