Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

All things related to Moving to Chile, tips, tricks, FAQS. Here is where to exchange information between those that have already moved and those planning to move to Chile so you do not need to learn the hard way. Please also check Living in Chile forum for related information.
User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17546
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by admin » Sun Feb 21, 2016 7:58 am

Notary or civil registry is generally the same thing when it comes to car transfers. Perhaps one less stop.

I don't know what they are talking about in regards to security, unless they are in a bad neighborhood or something. Both are used all the time for car transfers.

The transfer costs is your problem, if you want to legally own the car. Yea, some people might negotiate splitting the costs, and some dealerships might offer to cover the costs as an incentive to buy there (e.g. new cars), but at the end of the day it is your problem if the car does not transfer.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

SUNstone
Rank: Chile Forum Tourist
Posts: 11
Joined: Tue May 23, 2017 3:51 am

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by SUNstone » Tue May 30, 2017 10:34 pm

This is really comprehensive. Well done.
I'm kinda curious about off-roading in Chile. 2 years ago we bought a mid-size pickup (GMC Canyon) made some modifications like using a set of Duratrac we bought from <removed by admin>. My brother and I took it to off-road trail park and became enthusiastic about it. Since it is mentioned that Chevrolet is number 1 in Chile, so I can assume some people owns 4x4. I also read that El Norte Grande is a great place for this kind of activity. Maybe owning a car in Chile is a good thing.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17546
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by admin » Wed May 31, 2017 9:51 am

Pretty spammy click bait, but I'll bite.

First, Chevrolet is number one in sales, because they are cheap pieces of disposable crap, and they are taking advantage of a bunch of poor people that have few other options but to buy a chevy because they can not get financing anywhere else. They just had one get a safety rating of 0 stars in a crash test, and it is not like Chevy does not know how to build a safe car. They are just selling the most stripped down cars in Latin America they can.

I have a family member that bought a chevy, and the block cracked in its first 3000 km (in Santiago). The chevy dealer would not honor the warranty, and chevy chile just told them it was not their problem. Even Mahindra and the Chinese car companies have better reputations for honoring their warranties. Easy to dump stripped down dangerous cars on the market cheaply, when the warranty has no value. They finally sued them and got the motor replaced, but how many buyers just sucked it up and thought they could not fight Chevy? People drive american cars basically because they can not afford a Japenese, Korean, or German, and now they have to change cars in the central region. If you look at the sales numbers, they are by volume and they are selling their cheapest car in big numbers because people living around Santiago are being forced to unload any vehicle older than 2011 due to the new environmental restrictions going in to effect. They are buying the cheapest cars possible, because Bachelet jacked up the tax on new car sales (yea, that really helps encourage people to buy newer environmentally friendly cars). The american car companies are offering big financing on top of it, for a lot of people that would not otherwise be able to afford a new car.

Basically what Chevy is doing in Chile should be prosecuted, on a whole bunch of fronts (probably most the other american car companies); and that bailout they received from the government back in 2008, means they are dumping government subsidized cars on the Chilean market. They should have been put down with both barrels back in 2008, not saved.

This is probably the best time to buy a used 4x4 in Chile in a long time, if you don't have to deal with the smog restrictions in Santiago.The new environmental laws basically means that all those soccer mom 4x4 SUVs are going to be dumped on the market outside of Santiago, because they can not resell them inside Santiago. Just I would not touch an american car, and expect it to last more than about 200,000+ km (being generous here). So, good time for instance to buy things like toyota 4 runners and Hilux, and so on that have never seen anything but the malls in Santiago. Honestly, I would rather have a used Toyota or German car with say 100,000 km on it or just coming off of warranty, than a new american car. Even when mistreated, within reason, they are probably still going to last longer and hold their value longer.

There are some 4x4 clubs and such in Chile, but it is not a big thing. Chileans, especially from Santiago, have an aversion to dirt roads of any sort and even bigger aversion to DIY mechanical work. They might drive a 4x4 SUV, but most would panic the moment they see a dirt road, let alone anything that would challenge their vehicle or require driving skills. As soon as they see a dirt road, they start getting nervous, and act like they will end-up resorting to cannibalism to survive.

Chile is one big off-road park (sometimes in the middle of cities due to construction and bad roads). However, I am currently finding out the options for modifying anything for off-road is pretty limited in terms of parts availability, and really expensive when you do find it. It is just such a small specialized market for say things like mud or all terrain tires, and getting things like suspensions for a specific vehicle pretty much means importing parts or settling for something that is sort of ho-hum.

I am currently suffering from sticker shock myself trying to buy a set of mud tires for my Fj cruiser. Once you leave the super common tire sizes sold on most cars in Chile, the prices just go astronomical; that is, if you can find one to fit.

I have however in recent years started seeing a lot more say groups out at the coasts hitting the sand dunes and such. The dakar, even though it is no longer held in Chile, kind of kick-started some interest in off-roading as a hobby. Rally car races have become big in recent years. I seen a group out at the beach in Chiloe a few months back on the weekend. So it is picking up a bit of traction in terms of appeal to Chileans.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

HybridAmbassador
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3804
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 4:19 pm

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by HybridAmbassador » Wed May 31, 2017 4:32 pm

Seen Chevrolet brands sold in Chile and elsewhere in Latin America. Those Chevy branded vehicles are all made in Brasil.
Local engineering and no safety nor reliability built in them. However, the vehicles built in US and China are very much influenced by Toyota tech learnt in the days of Toyota~ GM alliance factory once called the NUMMI ( New united motor manufacturing ) in Fremont, CA. There the GM engineers were coming and staying all day in the Toyota side assembly line
and seeing the line moving churning out perfect assemble vehicles. However in their side of assembly, line stopped many time often. I guess the GM guys learnt very few from the free lesson given there to deploy in Brasil's factory..
HybridAmbassador. Toyota Hybrid system for helping climate change.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17546
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by admin » Thu Jun 01, 2017 12:29 pm

Here is my problem with American cars as I see it.

For generations they were the only game around, or at least they dominated all markets. They could produce garbage, with a few models actually being good (almost by accident), and no one really complained because they were the biggest producers.

Around the 70-80's they started mass producing garbage, with built in obsolescence, with an occasional accidental modal that for whatever reason did last. They were staying alive just out of brand loyalty. They openly promoted to their shareholders how much money they would make in parts, in addition to the sale of the car. They were built to breakdown.

That let the likes of Toyota and other Asian car makers get a toe in to the American market, as people started seeing that their cars were staying on the road with astronomical miles / km that no american car could match.

They never recovered. 40 years of producing crap and ripping off their customers, has dinged their reputation to the point, that you have to ask yourself when buying an American car the dirty hairy question: do you feel lucky?

Because, you might get lucky, and happen to buy the one model that they actually built for long-term reliability, but the probability it has gotten smaller, and smaller; yet, you can buy a car from a company with reputation for reliability for the same or less money. Why would you risk it?

I have been left on the side of the road, with broken down american cars, in my life at ratio of about 10 american cars for every 1 non-american car; and, I would say that I have probably now spent more time in none-american made cars. So the ratio is probably even worse, and they all seem to be very serious issues. Cracked blocks, dead transmissions, etc, often on new american cars; and a related fight to get the american car companies to fix them.

So, not going to risk my life nor my money, on an American car.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

HybridAmbassador
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 3804
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2012 4:19 pm

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by HybridAmbassador » Thu Jun 01, 2017 3:01 pm

Talking of over manufacturing of needed parts to keep repairing those downed domestic built cars seen on roadside of US interstates .
It is said that now days even American auto manufacturers are churning out much reliable vehicles to the market place.

The once "Big three" manufacturers of the world, switching their parts and component suppliers to, Toyota affiliated parts makers, a wise move.! Despite all these talking of American engineering, still there are very competitive field for American brands. Aircraft-Aerospace industry, Medical field, Computing and much more world leading technologies. Make America great again as said often by present US president...Ha,ha,haa and still GDP greatest of all, with a formidable US$ 18 trillion-plus and resuming policemen of the world role once again !
HybridAmbassador. Toyota Hybrid system for helping climate change.

Andres
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2696
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 3:09 am
Location: in transit

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by Andres » Thu Jun 01, 2017 6:47 pm

The best thing that could have happened to the US automobile industry was letting Chrysler and GM be wound up when they both went bankrupt.
The US govt, in their usual stupidity, rescued both.
Chile: My expectations are low. Very low.
I accept chaos. I'm not sure whether it accepts me.

Britkid
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1695
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:59 pm
Location: Talagante area, Chile
Contact:

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by Britkid » Fri Jun 02, 2017 7:01 pm

I tend to agree that failing companies should not be routinely rescued by the government however I don't think all the workers should be just made instantly unemployed and turned on on to the street either.

So perhaps the government can work with companies to ensure that some parts of the company are sold to competitors or restructured into a new company to help protect jobs.

Another idea is that the government bails out the company but on condition that all the senior management team leave and forfeit all bonuses and shares, or something like that.

bert.douglas
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 495
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 12:42 am
Location: San Diego, California

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by bert.douglas » Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:42 pm

GM was not really "bailed out".
The original GM corporation died. All the shareholders and bondholders lost everything. Also those with trade debt. Also "corporate paper" bank loans. Wiped out.

A new corporation was born, with government financing, and took over the assets, but shed all liabilities. No lawsuits over bad ignition switches. They are immune. That was a different corporation.

Andres
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2696
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 3:09 am
Location: in transit

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by Andres » Sat Jun 03, 2017 1:02 am

Britkid wrote:I tend to agree that failing companies should not be routinely rescued by the government however I don't think all the workers should be just made instantly unemployed and turned on on to the street either.
How do you know they would be worse off?
It is indeed possible that a more responsible company, making a more competitive and sustainable vehicle, will replace the old company and ensure their long-term employment.
The worse thing to do if you want long-term employment is to work for a company which makes crappy products. Even if they are selling based upon previous reputation or trade barriers, that too will end.
Chile: My expectations are low. Very low.
I accept chaos. I'm not sure whether it accepts me.

Andres
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2696
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 3:09 am
Location: in transit

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by Andres » Sat Jun 03, 2017 1:04 am

bert.douglas wrote:A new corporation was born, with government financing, and took over the assets, but shed all liabilities. No lawsuits over bad ignition switches. They are immune. That was a different corporation.
But, with the same crap designs and crap processes.
Chile: My expectations are low. Very low.
I accept chaos. I'm not sure whether it accepts me.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17546
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: Buying a Car (A Personal Experience)

Post by admin » Sat Jun 03, 2017 9:48 am

Britkid wrote:I tend to agree that failing companies should not be routinely rescued by the government however I don't think all the workers should be just made instantly unemployed and turned on on to the street either.

So perhaps the government can work with companies to ensure that some parts of the company are sold to competitors or restructured into a new company to help protect jobs.

Another idea is that the government bails out the company but on condition that all the senior management team leave and forfeit all bonuses and shares, or something like that.
Yea, all those Chinese workers the U.S. government bailed out really appreciate GM letting them keep their jobs:
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles ... -s-bonanza

https://qz.com/594984/the-secret-histor ... e-bailout/
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

Post Reply