Cost of Moving

All things related to Moving to Chile, tips, tricks, FAQS. Here is where to exchange information between those that have already moved and those planning to move to Chile so you do not need to learn the hard way. Please also check Living in Chile forum for related information.
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el kayakista
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Cost of Moving

Post by el kayakista » Sat Nov 04, 2006 7:15 am

here is a little info that you guys might find interesting. as some of you guys know that i currently live in south korea for work only and am on contract for work in regards to IT work. i have one more year on the contract, but i may have to cut it short because korea sucks and it's not a country that i want to be in. it kind of made think of how much i enjoyed chile out of all the south american countries i've visited.

okay, back on point. just recently i've asked the same company that moved me from SF to south korea to spit me out an amount to ship my house hold goods from SF to chile. in having 2,500lbs of house hold goods (hhg) including a 2000 Subaru Forester S in a 20' container. they had quoted me just under $9,000 from SF to chile. this is handling all the paper work in both ports, BUT the price does not include import tax. so does anyone know how much that cost, import tax that is? another solution in trying to cut cost in making the move from Ca to Chile was to drive my Subaru hauling some hhg items (kayaks, clothes, motorcycle). thus lessening the cost of the container by weight and adding more personal belonging coming from the state such as more furniture.

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Tybombero
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driving to chile

Post by Tybombero » Sat Nov 04, 2006 2:03 pm

I too have researched quotes on how to move to chile. I also have had the desire to do a road trip down there.

Just some things that i've found out about the drive.
I have everything reasearched and planned out to drive from Sacramento, Ca to the tip of SA and then was gonna fly home. just to let you know, it's almost almost 15k mi one way (probably more like 10 or 12k mi to get to the northern border of chile). So the gas cost would be enormous. Our plan was to have 5 of us go in a minivan and split the cost. Also there are a lot of things to think about such as border crossings and the complications of bringing a vehicle through those countries. It can be done, you just have to have thorough documents and titles and also need to prove that you're not going to stay in the countries, and that you're just passing through. Also the pan american highway has no connection from panama to colombia...that's the darien gap and you have to put your vehicle on a ferry. That can either be a roll-on/roll-off (RORO) ferry or a container ship, but either way, you can't accompany your vehicle and thus have to fly the short distance. once you're in colombia, you just keep going south through ecuador and peru, then chile. some people get nervous about driving through colombia, but my wife is from there, so i've been there a couple times and it's not too bad. it feels just like any other latin american country, but you just don't wanna be on the outskirts of towns or out in the country where the paramilitaries and guerrilla mess with you.

I think if your motive is to just move your stuff there, it would be better to just send everything by ship, and fly there. but it definately would be the trip of a lifetime to drive there. you might look into getting a 40 foot container to ships your goods in the same container as the car. I got a quote to send 1000 cubic ft, around 7000lbs, of goods along with a jeep cherokee, all in a 40 ft container for less than $7,000. oh by the way, It would take about 2 months to make the drive. I hear costa rica has horrendous roads and it's pretty slow going through central america.

ok good luck

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el kayakista
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holy smokes!

Post by el kayakista » Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:46 am

I have a lot of concern in regards to driving through Columbia and even the Darien Gap. I think it would be an amazing time to be able to execute a trip like that on a car carrying minimal belongings with me. For me it would be my kayaks, clothes, ski/board gear, and other misc things. I have heard of one other person doing it and he was successful at it. I can’t think of who it is right now but I would need to research his name. I have had the chance to drive in Central America, specifically in Costa Rica and I would have to say that the roads definitely needs work. As you drive through the mountains it gets real bad because of the VERY THICK fog and how the roads do not have proper reflectors. So yes, I know how it’s like driving out in Costa Rica which leads me to safely assume that it’s like that for the rest of Central America.

There are lots of other concerns in regards getting my house hold goods (HHG) from SF, Ca to Chile. One of things are taxes in receiving your HHGs, the others is registering your personal vehicles (POVs) to the Chilean DMV. There’s probably a lot of red tape in regards to having a California car and motorcycle in Chile. I would like to know what other have done in regards to this type of situation. Anyone? In my personal experience, my company moved me from SF, Ca to S. Korea where I work for the U.S. Government. I am excluded from all import tax such as bringing in my HHGs and other personal items. Since I will not be working for the US Embassy in Chile, then I suppose I will not have that privilege.

I have also learned in the past while being an Expat is that it is always smart to buy a POV in country because sometimes you will not find a mechanic who is qualified to work on your car or a dealership who will service your foreign car (it’s like that in Korea). In my case I own a Subaru Forester and there are Subaru dealerships out in Chile and BMW bike shops to where they can work on my motorcycle.

I have several motives in why I want to drive from Ca to Chile. 1 is for the experience, 2 is that I’m trying to find the MOST cost effective way of moving thus saving in shipment cost, 3 is that I’m cheap like that because I would like to have some money left to be able to start a business. Actually, I just re-read what I was saying and I think I should follow my own advice. I think I should just sell my car in the states and buy a car or truck in Chile as it may save me a few thousands of dollars in shipment, travel gas, insurance, border crossing in trying to explain what I am doing, the trouble of registering a foreign car and mileage on the vehicle can add 2 years. I suppose if I follow my own advise, then maybe I should just a make a motorcycle trip out of it instead. Cost of gas would be cut in half and it would be easier to sneak it into different parts of Central and South America because Carnets for bikes are no longer needed. BTW. I have driven from Anchorage, AK all the way down to SF, Ca at one point in time on a 1989 Ford Escort Pony with all my clothes, TV, and outdoor gear on the roof. El Kayakista’s move from Alaska to California: (http://new.photos.yahoo.com/alvin.monta ... 66630411/1)

Are you sure they quoted you for a 40ft container that’s for a Jeep Cherokee, and 7K lbs of HHGs? I’m thinking about what you said because that’s really cheap! 7K lbs is cheap and with a POV, wow! You must have a lot of HHG items. My big ticket items would be a (110-220 volts) 42” plasma TV, TV stand, my 220 volt Korean washer/dryer (BTW-they use the same type washer/dryer in chile as they do in korea) , my Korean gas stove/burner (perfect for Chile), a sleeper love seat, a reclining LAY-Z-BOY, a few white water/sea kayaks, a 20’ container and my Subaru Forester for just under $9K USD (insured) for 2500lbs. If I take out my car then it would be a lot less and a smaller container would be needed. I think I would need to shop around some more. Which companies have you contacted in regards to the move in Cali? Could you post their site/tele info?

Looking forward to any responses and experience in moving abroad with personal belongings to Chile or any part of S. America! The closer to Chile the better.

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Tybombero
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move to chile

Post by Tybombero » Mon Nov 06, 2006 1:02 am

wow, that was a big post. Yeah, you probably could do it cheaper by selling everything and just re-buying everything in chile...although of course you wouldn't have many personal belongings and would have to start from scratch again. Yeah, I actually got multiple quotes from container shipment companies for around $7k for the 1000 cubic feet (7k lbs). I can't remember the contact details or sites for those companies but what i did was googled "international movers" or "container shipping" etc and was able to find sites that would ask you the details of the move and then have multiple companies respond to you, either by phone or email to give you the quote. The way i figured out the 7k lbs was through a hhg calculator one of the site had. you would just check the boxes and how many of each type of item you had i.e. fridge, stove, couch, table, desk, medium box, dresser etc. it came up with around 6,500 pounds for me at just under 1000 cubic feet. they told me i would just barely be able to fit all that in with my jeep. Also i haven't heard of any containers smaller than 20 ft, so you might not be able to save much there. Try this site for some info about the drive: http://www.well.com/~dreyer/
I tried emailing this guy to get more info but having been able to contact him.

Yeah, i think maybe the coolest thing to do would be sell everything so you don't have to ship much, then drive your bike down. You would probable save a lot of money AND have the once-in-a-lifetime experience. of course, like i said, you bipass the darien gap by ferry and stay out of that mess. And in colombia just stay on the main roads at day. Stay out of the northwestern states (departamentos) as that's where there's some dangerous places.

well good luck. i'm interested to see if any body else has more info on this topic cuz i'm really interested in all the info i can get to make the move someday.

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el kayakista
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quotes

Post by el kayakista » Mon Nov 06, 2006 6:23 pm

i just got some quotes in regards to what i want to bring over. apparently the cheapest so far is 2977usd with door to door, but without insurance or packing. packing for me is miniscule so i think it'll come to around 4K usd with insurance and packing. the port area would be valaipairaso.

at 4k usd is cheap and it's looking good every day! i did get a quote from IntlMove:
Quote

Based on the information you provided,
Cost is as follows:
Miscellaneous Items:
* 20 ft container load, door to port service........ = $4,860.00

Est. Price:.......................... $4,860.00

on a 20' container. so they do have 20' containers. intlmovers was a bit expensive by at least a thousand in not having this insured. insurance would run an extra 1 thousand usd.

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admin
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realty check here

Post by admin » Tue Nov 07, 2006 3:56 am

I don't think I can cover all your concerns in one go, but a few warnings are in order.

First, on the driving to South America front. Watch out for the panamerican highway in Central America. I have a five inch scar on my ear still from too many trips on that road. It would raise the hair on Mad Max. Columbia will likely be the easy part.

Second, you can not bring a used cars in to Chile unless you plan to leave and reenter on a regular basis. Please look in to this in detail. It is a very complicated situation with the restrictions on the conditions of the vehicles and taxes involved. Much of it has to do with enviromental restrictions. Basically, you have to take it out if you bring it in. I believe it is every three months.

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el kayakista
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damn...

Post by el kayakista » Tue Nov 07, 2006 9:06 am

oh damn...

you're right charles. you can not import used vehicles into the country of chile from the US. probably because of strict smog thingy, but California is one of the more strictest state when it comes to vehicle output of smog or any other chemicals.

Q: Can I export used cars to Chile?

No, the importation of used passenger and cargo transport vehicles is prohibited. Limited exceptions do occur in the two free zones in Chile, Iquique in the far north and Punta Arenas in the far south. Used cars can be sold in these zones, but said vehicles cannot subsequently be sold outside the zones.
(http://www.mac.doc.gov/chileFTA/faq.html)

if i understood this correctly, then maybe brining my own things or claiming the true value of my items would be more costly than anything. maybe i should under value my things to lower the import tax. this is what the Free Trade Agreement has to say about that:

Q: What are the duties on U.S. direct exports to Chile?
As of January 1, 2003, over 95% of all new goods imported into Chile pay the uniform 6% import duty based on the CIF value of the goods. For used goods, the total import duty is 9%.

am i understanding this correctly? let's say i want to bring in my personal belongings into Chile, i would have to pay 9 percent import duty tax since my house hold good are used? so if i've valued my hhg at 9K usd, then i would have to pay 9Kx.9=810. or would this be for businesses? i AM ONLY ASSUMING FOR PERSONAL BELONGINGS.

&

Q: Are there exceptions to the 6% import duty?

Yes, for certain agricultural products, luxury goods and software. Such commodities as wheat, edible oils, sugar, and wheat flour are subject to a price band to protect local producers. The price band results in additional charges that can effectively raise taxes on the import to as high as 29%, once the 6% duty is factored in.

Luxury goods carry surcharges ranging from 30% to 70%, for goods such as articles of gold, platinum and ivory, furs, high quality rugs, yachts, cigarettes. As of 2003, the 85% automobile luxury tax is applied to the CIF value of the vehicle in excess of $15,835.

The actual software programs on magnetic media and the accompanying manuals are imported separately, in order to take advantage of special terms of the Uruguay Round. Thus, 90% of the value of the software exported is declared as technical printed matter, and as such is not subject to Chile’s import duty. The remaining 10% of the value is declared magnetic media and subject to the uniform 6% import duty.

i guess 9 percent isn't all that bad if you don't have a lot of crap with you. i would feel sorry for those people who's trying to bring over a damn house.

driving anywhere in south america scares the crap out of me. i've almost died a couple of times once at Ecuador on a bus from Guayaaquil, Ecuador to Lima, Peru and the other in Peru. the one in Ecuador was the scariest because our bus had hit either a big rock or a cow because the right front tire well caved in into the tire. we had to chain up the front and find a tree to pull the metal so that the tire well will not rub against the tire. by the way... the scariest part about it is that we were on top of a mountain coming down super fast and it was during the morning just as everyone was starting to get up. although we had a nice little alarm clock when we felt the bus GO ON TWO WHEELS as i had a front view of the river bed below us at about 600 yards of tumbling down the face of a cliff. holy crap that scary, but i'm alive today to tell about my s. america adventure. i want to do it again!!! :D

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admin
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personal goods

Post by admin » Tue Nov 07, 2006 12:14 pm

If you have your residency permit, you can bring in up to $5,000 US Free On Board value in goods tax free. If your residency permit is in process, then you place the goods in on site storage of your choice until your residency in cleared. By this they mean, you can keep your stuff at a your house. In theory, you are not suppose to use the goods. In reality, I don't think customs is going to be checking on you everyday to make sure you are not using the goods.

Most used stuff they will let you declare the cost at just about anything you want without too many problems.

At least driving in Chile is a bit better than the rest of Latin America. The highways are nice. Even if Chileans suck as drivers, outside of the central region, there are not as many people per square KM to deal with on the road.

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el kayakista
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Post by el kayakista » Tue Nov 07, 2006 10:42 pm

If you have your residency permit, you can bring in up to $5,000 US Free On Board value in goods tax free. If your residency permit is in process, then you place the goods in on site storage of your choice until your residency in cleared. By this they mean, you can keep your stuff at a your house. In theory, you are not suppose to use the goods. In reality, I don't think customs is going to be checking on you everyday to make sure you are not using the goods.
(Charles Spenser).

so charles. let's say i do find a place that i like that's right on the money. can i apply for residency or get the process going after i purchase land or a home so i can take advantage of the 5K US Free On Board? how long does that process usually take for residency to be approved?

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yes

Post by admin » Tue Nov 07, 2006 11:42 pm

The short answer is yes to all.

You just need your RUT/RUN from the IRS to buy property.

The time for getting your residency depends a lot on the type of residency you are asking for. That said, for shipping purposes you should be able to get that after you have your residency. In fact, you should be able to get it as you are in the temporary residency period.
To qualify for that it typically takes about 3 months before you are given your temporary residency. It is that 3 month waiting period (depending on the wait to process your papers), that you would not be able to qualify for the 5,000 US in tax free imports. However, even in that time you can get the deferred customs hold I was talking about above.

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el kayakista
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lesson learned

Post by el kayakista » Sat Mar 17, 2007 12:27 pm

while i was in chile i've learned something. if you bring any type of car over to chile, you will be paying an EXORBANT amount of tax to get into the country.

TIP: buy a car or truck in country instead and save yourself the trouble of paperwork, customs, taxes, and a burnt pocket.

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Chuck J 3.0
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USPS ?

Post by Chuck J 3.0 » Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:35 pm

I'm back in the US repacking my boxes. I won't be shipping any furniture or bulky items to Chile, mostly books and personal stuff that fits in smaller boxes. I think I'll have about 20+ boxes when done. At this point I'm looking at shipping it USPS Priority Mail International.

http://pe.usps.gov/text/imm/ce.16.8.htm#ep1398122

As weird as that sounds I believe it to be the cleanest and cheapest way to do it for this small amount of stuff. I'm trying to keep each box about 39 or 40 pounds, so at 151.90 per box x 20 boxes = $3,038.

I'm looking to ship maybe 2 or 3 boxes at a time as I need them. My brother told me he'll take them to the Post Office for me. My stuff has been sitting in a corner of his barn. Thanks Mike! :-) (no storage fees)

Any ideas or comments are welcome. Is this the cheapest way to do it? Any better alternatives you know of?

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