Open subjects

Anything at all (keep it clean) goes here that does not fit in to any of the other forums.

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marti
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Re: Open subjects

Post by marti » Wed Feb 25, 2015 9:56 pm

...
La mitad de eficaz. El doble de caro. El triple de complicado. Un país de cuarto.

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David_Bro
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Re: Open subjects

Post by David_Bro » Wed Feb 25, 2015 10:00 pm

SO would I----

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john
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Re: Open subjects

Post by john » Thu Feb 26, 2015 10:57 am

marti wrote:
john wrote:

I've been in Valpo hundreds of times and never been robbed.
That puts you in the rarefied probabilistic class alongside red-headed astronauts, lottery winners, and persons who have not yet been robbed in Valparaiso.
Russell Louis Schweizkart, Stuart A. Roosa and Ed While were red-headed astronauts. Presumably, there are one or two red-heads among the current group of astronauts. Doesn't sound like rarefied probabilistic class to me. :wink:
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

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marti
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Re: Open subjects

Post by marti » Thu Feb 26, 2015 11:03 am

john wrote:
marti wrote:
john wrote:

I've been in Valpo hundreds of times and never been robbed.
That puts you in the rarefied probabilistic class alongside red-headed astronauts, lottery winners, and persons who have not yet been robbed in Valparaiso.
Russell Louis Schweizkart, Stuart A. Roosa and Ed While were red-headed astronauts. Presumably, there are one or two red-heads among the current group of astronauts. Doesn't sound like rarefied probabilistic class to me. :wink:
Perhaps it should have been clarified that the reference was to joint probability of those three events.
La mitad de eficaz. El doble de caro. El triple de complicado. Un país de cuarto.

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Re: Open subjects

Post by David_Bro » Thu Feb 26, 2015 1:31 pm

Slow Cooked Rabbit Stew---

Ingredients:

140g prunes
50ml brandy
50g soft brown sugar
2 rabbits, jointed
plain flour, for dusting
1 tbsp vegetable oil
3 rashers smoked streaky bacon, sliced into thin strips
2 carrots, chopped
1 onion, chopped
2 celery sticks, chopped
1 garlic clove, crushed
2 thyme sprigs
1 bay leaf
150ml red wine, the best you can afford
250ml chicken stock
chopped parsley and wild rice, to serve


To the Cooking:

1.Heat oven to 150C/130C fan/gas
2. Put the prunes in a bowl with the brandy and brown sugar, stir, then set aside to soak.
3.Dust the rabbit in the flour---Set the rabbit aside.
4.Heat the oil in a large flameproof dish and brown the rabbit all over until golden – you may have to do this in batches. Add the bacon, vegetables, garlic and herbs to the dish and fry for 5 mins until starting to colour.
5.Pour in the red wine and scrape all the goodness off the bottom of the dish. Add the chicken stock and put the rabbit back in the dish with the boozy prunes, then cover and cook for 2 hrs, stirring occasionally, until the rabbit is totally tender. Serve scattered with parsley and wild rice on the side.

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marti
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Re: Open subjects

Post by marti » Thu Feb 26, 2015 2:07 pm

...
La mitad de eficaz. El doble de caro. El triple de complicado. Un país de cuarto.

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David_Bro
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Re: Open subjects

Post by David_Bro » Thu Feb 26, 2015 2:13 pm

I was thinking if the red headed astronauts were to get hungry....

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marti
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Re: Open subjects

Post by marti » Thu Feb 26, 2015 2:16 pm

...
La mitad de eficaz. El doble de caro. El triple de complicado. Un país de cuarto.

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rocksana
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Re: Show me the money

Post by rocksana » Thu Feb 26, 2015 4:32 pm

lotn wrote:
I am an American who studied in Finland and lives in Chile (that is perhaps obvious).
Nooo, not obvious at all :), in fact rather strange. Nice to have your input

lotn wrote: Although it was in the limited context of university I liked what Finland was about. The university (Joensuu in this case now known as the U. of Eastern Finland) wasn't the most high-tech but I got to work as a research assistant and use whatever equipment I needed to. I like Chile too and I like it more now that I live in a modern apartment with all the amenities you describe; I wasn't as fond of it when I was restricted to just a room in an older house. I think both Chile and Finland are a little boring compared to the U.S. but I got used to it and have learned to live more quietly. It really depends on what you want at that point in your life.

I wonder why students keep falling for those overpriced rooms in a shared house. I guess it costs almost the same as a studio or a shared apartment with your own bathroom and balcony... But anyhow, yes I agree with you that Finland and Chile might be a bit boring for certain things (you can't beat Finnish metal though ;) ) , but both are relatively empty countries. USA is huge and you can find everything there.
But maybe it is too big, you can't have it all in one day :)

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rocksana
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Re: Open subjects

Post by rocksana » Thu Feb 26, 2015 4:40 pm

Space Cat wrote:
You should try to live in Russia or other non-EU post-USSR country where life expectancy is 65 (because of crime, ecology and poor food quality), homicide rate 7-10/100k, corruption and ease of doing business indices are about 130th place. And when you're getting bad service that's not because somebody is too lazy but because (s)he hates you without any serious reason.
I tried it!, managed to survive almost one year in harsh conditions. Luckily didn't catch tuberculosis because the hospitals were falling apart and just horrible.
After that I never said again that Chile is a 3rd world country
Space Cat wrote: I traveled in US and UK but all the "developed" countries are too stressful to live. Too many things happening at the same time.
For me Chile is balanced enough to spend many years here, maybe even life. It's relaxing here.
I agree with you, we find Chile more and more appealing for settling down. Not much happens there, aside earthquakes and students' demonstrations.

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rocksana
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Re: Open subjects

Post by rocksana » Thu Feb 26, 2015 4:48 pm

marti wrote:

Patrimonio de la Humanidad, my ass. Cloaca del Hemisferio.

Naaa, you are exaggerating a bit. Valpo is not my favorite town, but there is a certain something about it. And last time I visited (spent LOTS of time there) it was *almost* neat... but I might have been stuck to the cleanest area of town, IDK.

I noticed, at least in that area, a lot of effort was being put on renovating those old Victorian houses. Also I noticed a dramatic reduction in stray dog population. Maybe they moved to Reñaca.

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David_Bro
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Re: Open subjects

Post by David_Bro » Thu Feb 26, 2015 4:58 pm

Valpo is internationally known for quality transexual adventures-----


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/d ... ile-gender

'He offered me 20,000 pesos for sex'

By Jimena Soto as told to Oliver Bach.

One of Chile's growing number of transvestites, Jimena Soto has experienced a lifetime of prejudice and social ostracism. As an Aids sufferer and former prostitute she has been discriminated against by health-workers, employers and even her own family – as well as brutally attacked by thugs and tortured by Pinochet's military regime. Chile might have its first ever female president in Michelle Bachelet, but attitudes to women are still rooted in a more 'macho' era. For gays and transsexuals, the problem is multiplied

Jimena recently set up a laundry service with the help of a municipal loan. Photograph: Oliver Balch Oliver Balch/Oliver Balch
Monday 17 December 2007 04.00 EST Last modified on Wednesday 11 June 2014 18.00 EDT
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I always knew I was really a girl. From as young as I can remember I used to dress up in my mother's clothes. But I came from a small town – San Felipe – where things like this aren't accepted. So when I was nine years old my mother sent me to live with my father in Valparaiso. They were separated, you see.

It cost a lot for my mother – God rest her soul – to accept my homosexuality. Until I was 35 she still hoped I'd get married. My dad, on the other hand, never understood; he sent me to a Catholic boarding school run by nuns. I think he thought they could beat it out of me.

I worked as a prostitute for almost 40 years – mostly here in Valparaiso, but also in Santiago. I started when I was 15. Transvestites have no choice: no one will employ us. I used to solicit customers on the streets near the National Congress building; the girl prostitutes would have one corner and the transvestites another.

Most of the prostitutes are working to help their families or to feed their drug habits. Don't go trying to talk to any of them while they're working though: often they're high and can get quite aggressive.

That said, it's not safe for them to work the streets either. Recently, my organisation, Alianza Tran [Transvestite Alliance], discussed the possibility of lobbying for a red-light zone. Then we realised that being in one spot, where everyone knew where we were, would just make us more vulnerable to attack.

So now everybody works independently. We sometimes pay for protection, but generally everyone looks after everyone else – us and the girl prostitutes together.

During Augusto Pinochet's military government [from 1973 to 1981] the abuse of sex workers – especially sexual minorities – was terrible. Many transvestites were tortured during the dictatorship. I had friends who were taken by the police and never seen again. I was only 16 or 17 when it all started. The authorities used to do all sorts of horrendous things to us. Once a police officer broke my fingers just because he saw me painting my nails.

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Back then it was more common for transvestites to work in brothels, which meant the police could raid us any time they wanted. On one occasion they took us back to the police station and for three nights subjected us to fake executions. They made us kneel down in a line and pretended to shoot us with a revolver. You can't imagine what it feels like to have a gun at your head and to hear it go "click".

In nearly four decades on the job I've lost count of the number of times I've been violated. The worst happened to me three years ago. I was attacked by a group of neo-Nazis. There are lots of them round here. It happened on the street, right in the middle of town. They pushed me down an alley and shoved a glass bottle up my rectum. I was in hospital for months. I couldn't work after that.

The police said they would investigate it, but like hell they would. I was given five minutes to explain my whole case to the public prosecutor. Five minutes! Do you know the agony those thugs caused me? The police never arrested anyone. And it's not just me: they've never arrested anyone for a homophobic attack.

The police and army might seem macho, but there seem to be a lot of closet homosexuals in uniform. Often, when they arrested us, they'd have their way with us too. The machista culture in general remains very strong here in Chile. Many hotels don't let men enter with other men – most still don't – so they'd go looking for a pintada [a "painted lady"].

Many of my clients came from a high social standing – doctors, politicians, lawyers, that sort of thing. Socially, it's hard for them to come out as homosexuals. There are other dangers as well, of course. Fourteen years ago, I contracted HIV. My condition developed into full-blown Aids two years ago.

I know exactly how it happened. Even though there was very little information about safe sex or anything like that back then, I'd still always insist on my clients using a condom. Then a French tourist offered me 20,000 pesos [around US$42] for sex without protection. I normally charged between 5,000 and 10,000 pesos. The money tempted me, I admit. Afterwards he said something I'll never forget. He said: "You are going to remember me for the rest of you life." He's right, I do, the maldito.

Ten years ago being HIV positive was like a death knell. No one knew anything about it. There was also discrimination in the medical system. They say your tests and medical records are private, but all the nurses get to see them and soon everyone knows. I went to the clinic once and the nurse wrote "HIV" in big red letters by my name. Some doctors didn't even want to touch me because I was HIV-positive.

I was on drugs back then, pasta base [cocaine sulfate] mostly. I quit immediately. My aunt Juanita is a nurse, so I told her first. She helped me get the medicines I needed. Then I travelled back to San Felipe and told my mum. She was very supportive, and so were my family. But then she died and things changed. One day my sister rang me up and said she never wanted me to come to her house again. Things like that really hurt.

Until recently I had a boyfriend. Our relationship lasted six years but we split up nine months ago. He's living with a woman now. We still see each other. In fact, I got a small loan from the municipal government to set up a laundry service and he sometimes helps out.

I think homosexuals are slowly becoming more accepted in Chile, although there's still a long way to go before society fully accepts us. For transsexuals, it's going to take even longer.

That's one of the reasons that I set up Alianza Tran a few years ago. It's important for us to show that we don't just stand on a corner and offer sex, but we can discuss important issues as well, such as discrimination and homophobia. Initially, when we used to do awareness-raising events, people would come to see transvestites for interest's sake. Now they come to listen to what we have to say.

At the moment we are pushing for transsexuals to be allowed to register themselves under their "fantasy" name. In Colombia, for example, the law lets you put yourself down as female in the civil registry even if you're a man. Officials still get very confused today when I present myself as a woman and my identity card says that I'm a man. I hope to live at least a few more years, and this is one of the things I'd like to see change.

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