Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

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jehturner
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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by jehturner » Thu Oct 04, 2012 2:28 pm

Oh, sorry. I must have misinterpreted the previous comments in this thread.

Thanks,

James.

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Re: <future> victims of TSA indignities...

Post by greg~judy » Tue Nov 13, 2012 10:57 pm

~
once again we must ask ourselves --- should we be even the slightest bit amazed...?
...at the results of this poll and at the numbers of homelanders who are...
...willing to tolerate virtually any indignity if it is performed in the name of safety and security...
:|
A new survey ... conducted by Harris Interactive has found that almost one third of American adults would accept a “TSA body cavity search” in order to fly, with a majority of Americans also feeling a law that would make disobeying a TSA agent in any public place illegal is reasonable.

The shock results emphasize the level of indignity Americans are willing to tolerate in order to travel.

They also highlight how the TSA’s reputation has remained largely intact despite a series of scandals and widespread criticism from innumerable public figures.

However, on other fronts the poll provides good news for those concerned with how liberties are being lost in the name of stopping terrorism. For example, a clear majority (65%) of American adults feel that TSA pat down policies that in some cases involve TSA agents touching travelers’ genitals are unacceptable.

The survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive ... from November 5-7 among 2059 American adults.

American adults were asked the following question as part of the poll;

“Given the recent reports concerning the threat posed by terrorists who plan to implant bombs within their own bodies, how willing, if at all, would you be to undergo a TSA body cavity search in order to fly?”

A total 30% of American adults said they would be “willing” or “somewhat willing” to accept a body cavity search. 57% would be “completely” or “somewhat unwilling” to submit to it and 13% answered “don’t know”.

Although the exact definition was not explained in the question, given that the term “body cavity search” refers to the most intrusive search imaginable, one normally performed on dangerous felons before they go to prison, the fact that almost one third of American adults would submit to such an invasion of their privacy simply to get on a plane is astounding.

Those concerned with how much power has been concentrated into the hands of TSA workers, who are after all federal employees and not police officers, would also be disturbed at the response to the following question;

How reasonable or unreasonable do you feel it is that travelers should be made by law to obey every command given by a TSA agent inside an airport or any other public place given the threat posed by terrorists?

A total 57% of American adults said this was “completely” or “somewhat reasonable”. A minority of 43% said passing a law that would mandate total obedience to a TSA agent was “completely” or “somewhat unreasonable”. Out of that figure, just 16% thought it was “completely unreasonable”.

Surprisingly given their traditional distrust of big government, 60% of Republicans thought it reasonable compared to 64% of Democrats and 46% of Independents.

We recently highlighted the fact that back in 2008, the Department of Homeland Security seriously pursued the idea of making travelers wear electronic shock bracelets that could be activated in the name of incapacitating “terrorists.” In reference to that news story, the survey asked the following question;

In 2008, the Department of Homeland Security expressed an interest in having travelers wear electric shock bracelets that would both track travelers through the airport as well as allow airport officials and flight crews to incapacitate potential terrorists. How willing, if at all, would you be to wear such a bracelet in order to fly?

35% of American adults would be “completely” or “somewhat willing” to wear the shock bracelet, compared to 52% who would be “completely” or “somewhat unwilling”. Republicans were more likely to be willing than Democrats, 41% to 34%.

Given the rash of stories about TSA agents touching travelers’ genitals as part of pat down procedures for those who “opt out” of body scanners, the poll posed the following question;

In some cases, the TSA’s more invasive pat down procedures now include agents touching travelers’ genital area through their clothing. How acceptable, if at all, do you feel this is, considering the potential major threat posed by terrorists?

Despite the fact that this policy is already underway in some instances, a full 65% of American adults found TSA workers touching genitals “completely” or “somewhat unacceptable”. A further 35% of American adults found this “completely” or “somewhat acceptable”. More Republicans than Democrats (12% to 9%) were likely to find this “completely acceptable”.

Asked how the TSA is performing in its screening duties at U.S. airports, 77% of American adults said the federal agency was doing an excellent, good or fair job. 23% of American adults thought the TSA was doing a not very good job or a bad job in its duties. Despite sustained negative media coverage of the agency’s activities, of that latter netcategory, only 9% in total thought the TSA was doing a “bad job”.

More Democrats than Republicans (84% to 73%) responded that they thought the TSA was doing an excellent, good or fair job.

The results of this poll again underscore how ignorant many Americans remain of their rights at airports and other transport hubs where TSA agents are present.
The results also clearly indicate that a substantial portion of Americans, around one in three, are willing to tolerate virtually any indignity if it is performed in the name of safety and security.

*********************

Abbreviated Methodology

This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of Free Speech Systems from November 5-7 among 2,059 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated.
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greg~judy
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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by greg~judy » Tue Nov 20, 2012 11:06 am

~
we remain...
still wondering...
WHY?
:|
Airport Security Is Killing Us http://www.businessweek.com/articles/20 ... killing-us

This week marks the beginning of the busiest travel time of the year. For millions of Americans, the misery of holiday travel is made considerably worse by a government agency ostensibly designed to make our journeys more secure. Created in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the Transportation Security Administration has largely outlived its usefulness, as the threat of a terrorist attack on the U.S. homeland continues to recede. These days, the TSA’s major role appears to be to make plane trips more unpleasant. And by doing so, it’s encouraging people to take the considerably more dangerous option of traveling by road.

The attention paid to terrorism in the U.S. is considerably out of proportion to the relative threat it presents. That’s especially true when it comes to Islamic-extremist terror.
Of the 150,000 murders in the U.S. between 9/11 and the end of 2010, Islamic extremism accounted for fewer than three dozen.
Since 2000, the chance that a resident of the U.S. would die in a terrorist attack was one in 3.5 million, according to John Mueller and Mark Stewart of Ohio State and the University of Newcastle, respectively.
In fact, extremist Islamic terrorism resulted in just 200 to 400 deaths worldwide outside the war zones of Afghanistan and Iraq
the same number, Mueller noted in a 2011 report (PDF), as die in bathtubs in the U.S. alone each year.

Yet the TSA still commands a budget of nearly $8 billion—which is why the agency is left with too many officers and not enough to do. The TSA’s “Top Good Catches of 2011,” reported on its blog, did include 1,200 firearms and—their top find—a single batch of C4 explosives (though those were discovered only on the return flight). A longer list of TSA’s confiscations would include a G.I. Joe action doll’s 4-inch plastic rifle (“it’s a replica”) and a light saber.
And needless to say, the TSA didn’t spot a single terrorist trying to board an airline in the U.S., notes Bruce Schneier.

According to one estimate of direct and indirect costs borne by the U.S. as a result of 9/11, the New York Times suggested the attacks themselves caused $55 billion in “toll and physical damage,” while the economic impact was $123 billion. But costs related to increased homeland security and counterterrorism spending, as well as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, totaled $3,105 billion. Mueller and Stewart estimate that government spending on homeland security over the 2002-11 period accounted for around $580 billion of that total.

The researchers quote Rand Corp. President James Thomson, who noted most of that expenditure was implemented “with little or no evaluation.” In 2010, the National Academy of Science reported the lack of “any Department of Homeland Security risk analysis capabilities and methods that are yet adequate for supporting [department] decision making.” In short, DHS (and the TSA in particular) is firing huge bundles of large denomination bills completely blindly.

There is lethal collateral damage associated with all this spending on airline security—namely, the inconvenience of air travel is pushing more people onto the roads. Compare the dangers of air travel to those of driving. To make flying as dangerous as using a car, a four-plane disaster on the scale of 9/11 would have to occur every month, according to analysis published in the American Scientist. Researchers at Cornell University suggest that people switching from air to road transportation in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks led to an increase of 242 driving fatalities per month—which means that a lot more people died on the roads as an indirect result of 9/11 than died from being on the planes that terrible day. They also suggest that enhanced domestic baggage screening alone reduced passenger volume by about 5 percent in the five years after 9/11, and the substitution of driving for flying by those seeking to avoid security hassles over that period resulted in more than 100 road fatalities.

That’s not to say TSA employees bear responsibility for making the roads more dangerous—they’re just following incentives that reward slavish attention to overbearing and ambiguous rules over common sense. And don’t blame the officials of Homeland Security, either. They’re merely avoiding the far greater backlash associated with doing nothing than with doing something—even if nothing is probably the right course in a lot of cases. Instead, the blame lies somewhere among the politicians, the media, and the electorate, who will happily skewer officials over a single fatal plane incident while ignoring car crashes, gun homicides, and even bathtub accidents, which kill far more Americans than terrorism does.

If Americans really care about saving lives this Thanksgiving travel season, for goodness’ sake, don’t beef up airport security any further. Slashing the TSA will ensure that more people live to spend future holidays with loved ones.
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

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Re: bye, bye rapiscan...

Post by greg~judy » Fri Jan 18, 2013 8:19 pm

~
there has been no whining about tsa for two months now... WHY?
we are sure many allchileans have flown in that period...
are you all happy <or inured?> to stay as perpetual victims of abuse...?
just wondering...?

anyway - we have breaking news - software? has failed rapiscan...
adios nekkid pixels <say hello to more groping???>
this may obviously please some?
but for g~j --- will we ever intend to fly into or out of yankistan <now>...?
still never --- nay never --- not ever...!
:|
Naked-Image Scanners to Be Removed From U.S. Airports

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration will remove airport body scanners that privacy advocates likened to strip searches after OSI Systems Inc. (OSIS) couldn’t write software to make passenger images less revealing.

TSA will end a $5 million contract with OSI’s Rapiscan unit for the software after Administrator John Pistole concluded the company couldn’t meet a congressional deadline to produce generic passenger images, agency officials said in interviews.

The agency removed 76 of the machines from busier U.S. airports last year. It will now get rid of the remaining 174 Rapiscan machines, with the company absorbing the cost, said Karen Shelton Waters, the agency’s assistant administrator for acquisitions. The TSA will use 60 machines manufactured by L-3 Communications Holdings Inc. (LLL), the agency’s other supplier of body scanners, and will move some scanners to busier airports to reduce waiting times.

“It became clear to TSA they would be unable to meet our timeline,” Waters said. “As a result of that, we terminated the contract for the convenience of the government.”

OSI Systems rose $2.37, or 3.5 percent, to $70.02 in Nasdaq trading.

The decision to cancel the Rapiscan software contract and remove its scanners wasn’t related to an agency probe of whether the company faked testing data on the software fix, Waters said.

In November, Representative Mike Rogers, then chairman of the House Transportation Security subcommittee, wrote in a letter to Pistole that the company “may have attempted to defraud the government by knowingly manipulating an operational test.” Rogers, an Alabama Republican, said the panel had received a tip about falsified tests.

Rapiscan has denied manipulating data or information related to the reviews.

OSI Systems is “pleased to reach a mutually satisfactory agreement with the TSA” that will involve moving the machines to other government agencies, Chief Executive Officer Deepak Chopra said in a statement. The company, based in Hawthorne, California, said it expects to report a $2.7 million one-time charge during the quarter that ended Dec. 31.

OSI Systems hasn’t sold a body-image scanner to TSA in two years, and the company’s share price has been down since a November House hearing, said Timothy Quillin, a technology analyst with Stephens Inc. in Little Rock, Arkansas.

“They hadn’t really intended to sell more body scanners to airports,” said Quillin, who has an overweight rating on OSI Systems. “To have a resolution to just cancel the contract on the privacy software development is a positive outcome.”

The TSA accelerated its use of advanced scanners in 2010 following the failed Dec. 25, 2009, attempt by Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab to blow up a Northwest Airlines flight by igniting explosives in his underwear.

L-3 scanning machines rely on millimeter-wave technology, which uses radio frequencies that can find both metallic and non-metallic items. Rapiscan’s machines are based on backscatter technology, which uses low-dose X-ray radiation to detect objects under a passenger’s clothes.

Airline passengers were offended by the revealing images, including those of children and the elderly. The Washington- based Electronic Privacy Information Center sued the agency in July 2010, claiming the scanners violated privacy laws and has called use of the machines equivalent to a “physically invasive strip search.”

Under pressure from privacy advocates and some members of Congress, the TSA moved its screens to separate rooms away from airport security checkpoints. Officials monitoring the scanner images alert agents if they see a possible risk.

The agency put out a contract in August 2010 asking L-3 and Rapiscan to develop the software to make images less revealing. L-3 developed its product in 2011, according to John Sanders, the TSA’s assistant administrator for security capabilities.

Rapiscan recently indicated to agency officials that it couldn’t deliver its software until 2014, Sanders said. It couldn’t come up with an algorithm that met the agency’s standards for accurately detecting objects without generating false alarms, he said.

“You can have a high probability of detection but a great deal of alarm,” Sanders said. “Everybody’s alarming. That doesn’t work from an operational perspective.”

TSA has contracted with L-3, Smiths Group Plc (SMIN) and American Science & Engineering Inc. (ASEI) for new body-image scanners, all of which must have privacy software. L-3 and Smiths used millimeter-wave technology. American Science uses backscatter.

The agency’s strategy for handling passenger traffic relies on the capability of L-3’s millimeter-wave machines to process passengers in about half the time for Rapiscan machines, Sanders said. TSA will be getting about 60 more L-3 scanners in January and February, he said.

TSA is also planning to move some scanners from airports where they’re underutilized, Sanders said. The agency plans to expand the PreCheck program, in which passengers share personal data before going to the airport in exchange for less-invasive screening that lets them keep their belts and shoes on.

PreCheck passengers go through metal detectors instead of body-image scanners. As PreCheck expands, it will free up millimeter-wave machines to ease crowding, Sanders said.

Sanders said the Rapiscan units did their job by screening 130 million passengers, and the agency wouldn’t have acted if not for the congressional mandate for privacy software.

“We are not pulling them out because they haven’t been effective, and we are not pulling them out for safety reasons,” Sanders said. “We’re pulling them out because there’s a congressional mandate.”

The TSA is talking to other government agencies with screening needs that might not require the same level of privacy called for in a crowded airport, Sanders said.

Rapiscan sells its body-image scanner, known as the Secure 1000, to the Pentagon for screening visitors and to U.S. forces in Iraq and Kuwait, according to federal contract databases. The company’s website also says it sells the machines to prisons.
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
--- Giuseppe Tomasi di Lamedusa

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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by Ripsigg » Mon Jan 21, 2013 1:48 pm

G&J, I wonder if so many detest TSA thugs because of their presumption that everyone is a possible terrorist?

Yesterday, I passed through security in Urumqi, China. It's a restive part of China on the frontier with the stans and they take security very seriously....I can say it was the nicest airport security experience I have ever had. Yes, they made me take off my shoes and belt, but they were at least friendly. More importantly, they weren't idiots. They did a thorough search and had no problem with us taking on stuff for our newborn baby like formula and water(about 1.5 liters). They were joking and kind.....they did their jobs but they didn't treat us like terrorists. I think it was a key difference....their job was to search our bags and check for illegal items, not try to see if they could trick us into admitting that we were part of some weird plot.

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Re: more potential victims of TSA...

Post by greg~judy » Fri Nov 01, 2013 8:55 am

~
jeez - nine months of pregnant pausing - for another hit on this thread...
yep, time for the rebirth...
bringing the dismal/dysfunctional tsa back into the thread~whirld of allchile.net...

so just one more for inclusion today - one more in the plethora of reasons/excuses...
of why g~j will never/ever fly into/out of the totalitarian~homeland...
but of course, others may certainly do their own due diligence and choose accordingly...
:|
TSA: 75% of Domestic Travelers a Flight Risk
Jeff Berwick | The Dollar Vigilante | October 30, 201

The Transportation Security Agency believes that 75% of Americans are suspect. One indicator that you are a “risk” while flying? Owning a passport.

And so, what does the TSA do about it?

Even for domestic flights, they scan government and private databases including car registration and employment information.

Does your DMV record scream “bad slave?” Thinking that maybe now is a good time to go?

If so, maybe you’re too late.

But, don’t worry, before you get too stressed, take a deep breath. After all, you just might be among the 25% of travelers the TSA believes won’t need extra screening at the airport. Hey, anything is possible. Consider you and your groin lucky!

As for the other 75%, the government now assumes greater authority to use travelers’ data for domestic airport screenings. The agency insists this is merely to streamline the check-in procedures for millions of passengers (you know, the “25%”).

Whatever the reason given, one thing is for sure: traveling by air from California to Arizona, or New York to Massachusetts, will be like traveling from China into the US.

Some of the pre-screening has already begun. The TSA explained the new procedures in documents it had to release to comply with government regulations about the collection and use of individuals’ data.

Of the program, bureaucratese-laden documents aside, the unwashed public has yet to be told.

Nobody can be certain exactly what, and how much, information the agency relies upon to assess the general public. It has a stifling amount of data at its fingertips: tax identification numbers, past travel itineraries, property records, physical characteristics, law enforcement, intelligence information and even credit scores. Surely, the list goes on.

If you and your genitalia are desired, you might receive a boarding pass with “SSSS” printed upon it. This will make it hard to break the ice with your fellow passengers. If you make the plane, that is.

Heretofore, the government has publicly relied upon a security protocol called Secure Flight. This program called for a passenger’s name, gender and date of birth to be compared with terrorist watch lists and/or no-fly lists.

The new beefed up version of interstate travel entails traveler’s passport numbers, just like at the international borders, as well as other identifiers used to access a web of databases managed by the Department of Homeland Security.

An anonymous official “emphasized that the main goal of the program was to identify low-risk travelers for lighter screening at airport security checkpoints, adapting methods similar to those used to flag suspicious people entering the United States.”

What’s considered a red flag by the TSA? According to the un-named agent:

“Anyone who has never traveled outside the United States would not have a passport number on file and would therefore not be subject to the rules that the agency uses to determine risk.”

The documents released by the TSA, however, admitted the agency was pre-screening all passengers in some fashion.

Aside from having a passport, the agency looks into things like an individual’s travel itinerary, length of stay abroad and type of travel document, like a passport or visa. The TSA also requires airlines to hand over a traveler’s passport number, even on domestic flights.

The TSA knows which passengers belong to frequent-flier miles, as well as past travel reservations, a type of record known as ‘passenger name records.’

The new, enhanced screening procedures parallel the TSA’s introduction of PreCheck, which, as it turns out, was more a distraction from the true TSA procedures than what it was stated to be: a convenience for travelers.

The TSA has harped on its goal of giving 25% of all passengers lighter screening by the end of 2014, meaning 75% of passengers are considered, at least, “low-risk” travelers. Are you one of them?

If so, you will enjoy repeated searches from here until our grave. Or until you leave the US. You can have no hopes before boarding of leaving your pants and jackets on, and your laptops in their bags. Oh, and not to mention your genitalia ungrazed.

Too unjust for you? Well, feel free to appeal. The Department of Homeland Security has instituted a Traveler Redress Inquiry Program. Yours will be among the approximately 13,000 inquiries the program receives every nine months.

Are you surprised by the over-reaching TSA policy? Don’t be. In a blog post, the TSA stated that the program isn’t new.

Instead of begging the TSA to stop behave itself, you should make sure you never have to encounter them again. Take the first step in untangling yourself from the collapsing USSA and its checkpoint police state by clicking here.
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise.
--- Surangama Sutra
“If we want everything to stay as it is, everything will have to change."
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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by seawolf180 » Fri Nov 01, 2013 11:53 am

Ripsigg wrote:G&J, I wonder if so many detest TSA thugs because of their presumption that everyone is a possible terrorist?

Yesterday, I passed through security in Urumqi, China. It's a restive part of China on the frontier with the stans and they take security very seriously....I can say it was the nicest airport security experience I have ever had. Yes, they made me take off my shoes and belt, but they were at least friendly. More importantly, they weren't idiots. They did a thorough search and had no problem with us taking on stuff for our newborn baby like formula and water(about 1.5 liters). They were joking and kind.....they did their jobs but they didn't treat us like terrorists. I think it was a key difference....their job was to search our bags and check for illegal items, not try to see if they could trick us into admitting that we were part of some weird plot.
In other words, they used criteria. Weren't politically correct. Oh Dear! Probably profiled you.
They are pretty good at what they do.
Nothing done by the USA Federal government, is done well anymore. Nothing.
They suck at Everything they do. They don't really care about consequences, they just keep their jobs and power, they are not accountable.
They are just following the lead of that inept narcisist in the White House.
Don't Tread On Me Either.

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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Fri Nov 01, 2013 12:01 pm

Anyone traveling in the next months, please report if they sense a change. Especially want to track any increase in SSSS boarding passes (I personally have never had one but this may soon change?).
There are two ways to be fooled.

One is to believe what isn't true;

the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Nov 01, 2013 3:52 pm

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:Anyone traveling in the next months, please report if they sense a change. Especially want to track any increase in SSSS boarding passes (I personally have never had one but this may soon change?).
SSSS boarding passes
What are those passes, definition please.
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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:00 pm

All this TSA screening is pre-checkin. When you checkin for your flight and the system has flagged you, when the agent prints out your boarding pass there will be a "SSSS" on it which indicates to the TSA screeners that you will get the full monty. From the articles, it sounds that now up to 75% of travelers may get this?

So the request for others to report in, and don't forget to ask for a kiss after the third-base feel out session.
There are two ways to be fooled.

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the other is to refuse to believe what is true.

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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Nov 01, 2013 4:20 pm

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:All this TSA screening is pre-checkin. When you checkin for your flight and the system has flagged you, when the agent prints out your boarding pass there will be a "SSSS" on it which indicates to the TSA screeners that you will get the full monty. From the articles, it sounds that now up to 75% of travelers may get this?

So the request for others to report in, and don't forget to ask for a kiss after the third-base feel out session.
Domo-Arigato, EEUU-san, will report.
I have a portion of last trip boarding pass and checked it since you mention the "ssss" but nothing shown on it.
So I hope not be included on that 75% class. I have gotten a LAN fared trip for Jan/04 will see then....
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Re: Victim of TSA badged flight attendants

Post by Riyko » Fri Nov 01, 2013 6:27 pm

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:Anyone traveling in the next months, please report if they sense a change. Especially want to track any increase in SSSS boarding passes (I personally have never had one but this may soon change?).
I'm flying within the US for Thanksgiving and Christmas, then Chile in January. I shall post here with my experience. I'll either get a pass or raise a red flag because I'm traveling with my daughter.
"por la muestra se conoce el paño"

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