prepping, for the super rich

Anything at all (keep it clean) goes here that does not fit in to any of the other forums.

Moderator: eeuunikkeiexpat

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Fri Mar 03, 2017 8:19 pm

but then where do I park my Lamborghini when the world ends?
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:59 am

cali_chile48 wrote:Some of you guys make simple things very complicated. We need food, water and shelter. Everything else is a bonus.

A well insulated house, some chickens and goats in a fishing village, a good rain water retention and purification system plus a well, a nice vegetable garden, a pile of firewood.....all of that is available for small change....but it's not a life for people who like to sit on their ass all day, nor those who expect to be served by others.

Growing up poor has its advantages. You don't expect to get by without working your ass off, and a simple game of dominoes with a good friend some good beer is all you need.
You know the other day, I started reading Vickter Frankle's "man's search for meaning" again.
Here it is for anyone that might be ambitious. Highly recommended.
https://archive.org/details/MansSearchF ... ng-English

I read it years ago when I was taking a classes on existentialism in Philosophy and holocaust history. The philosophy aside, what is fascinating is his annalists of the most essential elements that a human needs to survive, as he was a prisoner at Auschwitz (also a place every human should visit at least once in their life).

He goes in to great detail about what it is a human needs to survive at the absolute minimum. Of course a minimum of food, water, shelter; and, obviously, all in very short supply to the prisoners at Auschwitz.

However, beyond those basics, there is also a sort of minimal amount of 'meaning' required to survive. As a psychiatrist, he was able to document the differences between those that made it through aushwitz and those that did not. What caused them to give up.

After reading that, I would also recommend reading "ordinary men". The other side of the coin. It is about one of the Nazi extermination units, and the ordinary men that carried out these exterminations of the Jews, poles, and many others in Poland. They were not made up of elite SS, highly indoctrinated in to Nazi propaganda. In fact, often they were not even german, or were some rejects that would never make it in the regular german military.

Here is a copy:
http://hampshirehigh.com/exchange2012/d ... (1992).pdf

What is striking is how similar the psychology was between both victims and perpetrators of the crimes, and the coping mechanisms they both employed when faced with the horror of their circumstances. The dehumanizing nature of it.

My point is, with bringing this up, that I am constantly in our business bombarded with all sorts of wild "survivalist" techniques, ideas, books, schools of thought, whatever you want to call it.

However, if you want to understand real survival at it's ultimate extremes of human endurance, and often far beyond, you need to study the ultimate extremes. Not some fantasy mad max world. The real extremes. Start from there; then work your way towards what is required to improve your situation. As victor frankle describes in great detail, in terms of material things, simply a pair of shoes could make the difference between life or death in the sub-zero camps of poland. That is survival at it's most brutish, basic, and even beyond what Hobb's perhaps imagined to be the natural state of man.

But, as Frankle concludes, you can die just as easily in a penthouse apartment surrounded by servants in New York, as you can in Aushwitz, if your life has no meaning. Crawling in to a nuclear bunker by yourself and locking the door, is probably just going to be a one way trip to hell.

It is the quality of life that counts, more than the quantity. That takes far more planning and resources.

One of the most sort of eye-popping, thought provoking, 'oh, shit' moments I had about disaster planning was a conversation I had with my sister in law one time. This was after the 2010 earthquake I think, my wife and I were sort of still patting ourselves on the back for being mostly prepared for it.

So, we were talking about it to the family, being prepared with food, water, some other things. We asked her what they were going to do in the event of an emergency. She simply said, "we are going to your house".

That completely changed my priority prep list. I started by asking myself, 'who was I not going to turn away at that door in an emergency'?

The list got pretty long, pretty fast.

Regardless if you are just stashing a little bit of extra food and water, or building a nuclear bunker under your house; your survival, and most likely the most important thing you need to preserve, meaning in your life, is intimately linked with many other people's survival. So plan accordingly. The easiest way to do that, is help the people on that list plan.

So little by little, we have built up a rather extensive network of friends and family, to help each other out in an emergency. Sometimes helping them out comes in surprisingly basic and simple ways.

For instance, on my todo list this year is to take my nephews and niece, along with some of the adults, camping and fishing. They have never spent a single night in a tent or sleeping bag. They have never baited a hook. From that hopefully flows more fundamental survival lessons, like don't get your feet wet in the woods unless you have to. Don't take unnecessary risks in remote areas. careful about how much stuff you pack, you have to carry it. So on, and so forth. Things that having grown up camping, hunting, and fishing in remote areas, I sort of take for granted. I take them so for granted, I probably would not even occur to me to try and explain it to them in the abstract. You kind of got to do it.

So, anyway, priorities can be surprising.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

Andres
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 2696
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 3:09 am
Location: in transit

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by Andres » Sat Mar 04, 2017 11:43 am

I can empathize with that.
My daughter, who grew up in Sydney (albeit with a Chilean mother), started camping with me at a very young age. She developed the nouse, knowledge and wisdom, well before she was a teenager, to be able to survive in the bush or if TSHTF.
My step-sons, who grew up in Santiago and have a Chilean mother, at 14 years old, are bloody useless and would not survive in either situation. They have no tolerance for discomfort, no strength (muscular or of character), no stamina, no courage and no willingness to experience anything. They see no value in developing any skills which would increase their self-reliance (in or out of the bush).
My first thought, if something occurs, will be to ensure my daughter and me make contact.
Chile: My expectations are low. Very low.
I accept chaos. I'm not sure whether it accepts me.

User avatar
David_Bro
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:35 pm
Location: Los Angeles, California
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by David_Bro » Sun Mar 05, 2017 4:08 am

Haaaaa----the Chileans are ahead of you on this------
Britkid wrote:The motorcycle idea is a good one, but it's only really needed to escape from an immediate disaster like an incoming tsunami to New York City so a limited sort of use. By the way, that thing in the movies where the highway is gridlocked in one direction to escape the alien invasion or whatever, with one lone hero driving down the completely empty other side of the road to go in and fight the aliens...they always get that wrong. In reality, people would just start using the highway in both directions to get out of the city and no-one would be able to get in. You'd need the motorcyle to get IN not out. I have still not seen a movie use this obvious plot device yet.
From a quote early on in the topic-----it used to be that for, principally Semana Santa, coming back from Vina to Santiago---this would actually happen----drivers frustrated with the flow of traffic would just actually cross the line, even through the tunnel, back to Santiago-----the pacos where there to try and stop it but they would just get overwhelmed and traffic to Vina would just have to pull over and wait----this was back in the 80's but would usually start around the last day back at about 3pm to say 6pm before the force on the opposite side of the road would not be enough to discourage the westbound lanes to fade off the highway-----classic

###

User avatar
David_Bro
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 383
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 3:35 pm
Location: Los Angeles, California
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by David_Bro » Sun Mar 05, 2017 4:38 am

Interesting what the Admin has brought up----Never used to understand my pops who grew up in the depression and was by the time I came around a doctor---any appliance we had that was going to trash would first undergo a week dismantling in the garage to be fleshed out for nuts, bolts, screws, tubing and everything else---we had a small shop attached to the garage and it would all be stored along with everything else---bottles, cans etc---not a mess by any means but enough to serve you well until you got help or had to get out and even if it you to make something to get the family out with what you needed---and all of this with a full compliment of tools, electric and hand

Dad grew up on a farm, where much like my place in Chile was a 60 km trip to get anything you needed---so, I implemented the same idea but with somewhat of a more aggressive plan that included gas cans and a lot of canned food, milk etc(not to mention what you already have on the farm in the way of preserves, a water cistern, and obviously all the animals, seasonal crops etc...)----at the least it meant we could continue with any issue and not have to go to town for up to a month if not much more for any standard project we wished to start and complete-----even maybe 6 to 8 months or even a year for an emergency situation----

In the 2010 earthquake, we were fine and continued on like it did not even happen even with power off for a week and then on and off for several weeks after-----a little planning for the day to day operations of activities but nothing out of hand or too complicated beyond other projects we were doing anyway----but, I think its important to take into account the situational process on the ground for where you are----can you depend on neighbors and which ones for how much, which neighbors can you help and depend on later if you need it----where do supplies come from in regard to north or south, how often and what are natural resources for your region----wood, cement etc----in the south, wood is not so much and issue and can replace gas in the form of firewood for heating and cooking----in the north, not so much----

Even maps of the area so you can make it to the border if you had too----taken in time with a plan to make do until you have everything, it is NOT hard to do and if you plan it naturally, it comes very easy----I think too, knowing your plan and the situation, you can easily predict at what point in time you have to move to do what and its not such a hardship to move on things you would never think of if you did not know what to do or had no idea to do----it can be as complicated as having your house set to flip over to a generator if you had too with just a 30 second maneuver (we had this) or just living in Santiago and having a couple sheets of plywood on the side of the house to cover up broken up windows and doors or building an outside shelter if need be---

Maybe the trickiest part----its protecting what you have stored up and prepared for from others that have made no plan and are perfectly willing and ready to forcefully or by trickery, take what you have seen ahead and prepared for---I built my house with out building that have cover and command over the surrounding terrain---again, just simple planning


###

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:27 am

bro, dude, bro, that little button that says "enter" on your keyboard, it is there for a reason.

:boom:

a break or two in the text.


yea, I have wondered what percentage of the human population today knows how to even do the most basic things to survive without a seven eleven. Things like start a fire. Make a shelter. Finds some food (not pizza delivery). Even just 40 or 50 years ago, it was pretty common knowledge right next putting on your shoes.

Even among the new "prepper" movement, it is shockingly surprising how silly most of their prep ideas are. In fact, a lot of it is just commercialization to sell crap to people that do not even know what to do with it.

A very well meaning friend, that was getting a little prep bag together, gave me one of those high-tech springy fire starters. He bought two, as he was putting his kit together. I appreciate the gift, but I told him to wait until the next rain storm, go outside and try and light fire in the rain and the wind with that. It will be self-exploratory in about 5 mins why those are not very useful. yea, they create a spark, and yea you could light a fire with one on nice day, just not the best tool for the job when you have the option to buy a better tool. I told him buy a couple of good disposable bic lighters, and stick them in your bag next to the high-tech fire starter (a bic lighter, will last like 30 days easily with heavy use. buy a bright red one so you don't loose it in the grass). actually, for emergency fire lighting, when your bic lighter does not work, I like the ones that allow you to scrape off a little bit of magnesium. When everything is soaking wet, you want something that will still burn in a 50 mile an hour wind.

My advice to anyone that is serious about prepping, go camping once a year. a few days to a week should be good, but more is better. preferably away from any sort of campground. Use a primitive camp site. Everything you forgot to bring will be obvious, and all the stuff you brought that was a waist will also be obvious.

They had that prepper show a few years ago on history channel. I swear like 50% of the people looked like they had never camped out a night in their life, and the other 90% were so out of shape camping out at the local KOA might have been too dangerous for them.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Sun Mar 05, 2017 9:55 am

yea, on motorcycles, I gave that some thought a few years ago. I almost bought a dirt bike in fact, just for fun. I just don't find them practical. Limited amount you can carry. cross country, without trails, they are pretty useless. Highways, perhaps. definitely improved gas mileage when gas is in short supply, but that is only so helpful.

I think I would get a horse trailer and a couple of serious 4x4 (2 horses, 4 feet each). In southern Chile, they are really the only thing that would get you from point A to point B off road, due to the number of streams you have to cross, trees down over trails, and so on. I once went to look at a property up in the mountains for a client. We borrowed some horses from one of the local ranchers. I swear the horses spent more of the day in the air than on the trail, due to the number of downed trees we had to jump. That was besides fording rivers that not even the most snorkeled out 4x4 truck would have been able to cross, or trails that had been used so much by cows and horses that they had literally cut a groove in to the forest floor that was higher than the head of the horse. You had to put your feet up on the horses saddle as you went through.

Even on foot, in southern Chile you can only travel so far before the cold and fast moving streams will stop you.

A few years back there was that air plane that crashed on take-off from la junta. The plane crashed only a few km from the end of the runway. It took them over a week to located the survivors (we flew on that plane just a few months before). Even after they located them, it still took them another day to reach them due to the high water in the rivers. Another pilot friend of ours was on the salvage mission for that plane. They had to rope in and out via helicopter to get the motors and other things that were still in decent shape. There was essentially no ground access, except by horse.

so, yea, I guess a motorcycle would help, but don't get a big one. You most likely would need to carry it, if you ever left the road. Perhaps a mountain bike would be more useful.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

Britkid
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1721
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:59 pm
Location: Talagante area, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by Britkid » Sun Mar 05, 2017 11:41 am

My wife brought me one of those fancy little magnesium firestarters as a present, for use on my occassional slightly mad mountain trips. I figured I'd try it out at home first, but couldn't get it to do anything, even after at least half an hour of trying in zero winds and perfect light. I can get the sparks to repeatedly hit the magnesium shavings, but nothing happens, either it's a waste of space, or I'm just useless. Anyway, if the end of the world comes, I'm basically screwed.

User avatar
Space Cat
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1369
Joined: Thu Dec 04, 2014 9:20 pm
Location: Valdivia

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by Space Cat » Sun Mar 05, 2017 12:35 pm

admin wrote:yea, I have wondered what percentage of the human population today knows how to even do the most basic things to survive without a seven eleven. Things like start a fire. Make a shelter. Finds some food (not pizza delivery). Even just 40 or 50 years ago, it was pretty common knowledge right next putting on your shoes.
This guy definitely knows, we should rely on him when it's all gone. xP
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JX ... lZyD3nQdBA

User avatar
MikieO
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 1613
Joined: Sun May 13, 2007 2:41 pm
Location: USA

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by MikieO » Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:24 am

I made the effort to get to a club de tiro in Santiago where they put on IPSC matches (my old passion). The goal at the time was to get the membership card (+\_. $2000 for 2 yrs) then apply for permission to buy a Glock. This thread reminded me why I bothered (armed home invasion robberies in Santiago) and also why I stopped trying.
I mentioned that I liked shooting to my mechanic who was fixing the AC on my pickup, we shared experiences in a somewhat one sided fashion and nothing more was said. Imagine my surprise when a few days later I was offered a Mauser 98 in 7.62 NATO. I refused of course, not because I dislike Mausers (I have several in the US) but obviously because a gringo with an illegal firearm would be a jail pinata for a long time.
My workaround is simple. Air rifles have grown up again. Not the castrated 12 ft lbs toys of my youth in the UK but this sort of thing: http://articulo.mercadolibre.cl/MLC-442 ... e-9-mm-_JM
This happens to be a single shot but a chat with a dealer and one can legally own the likes of this:
http://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/Evanix_Ra ... /2750/6883
Of course its going to cost more and you'll want the pump seeing as the power will be off, but don't despair. You CAN defend your bunker in Maipu! :roll:
“Now, a lifetime of experience has left me bitter and cynical.” ~ Calvin & Hobbes

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Tue Mar 07, 2017 11:47 am

I am kind of surprised bows and cross bows are not more common, considering they can be bought without a license. They are sold everywhere, right next to the pocket knife displays in outdoor stores.

Then also, they take some skill to shoot yourself in the foot with, and what fun is that.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

User avatar
admin
Site Admin
Posts: 17768
Joined: Sat Aug 26, 2006 11:02 pm
Location: Frutillar, Chile
Contact:

Re: prepping, for the super rich

Post by admin » Wed Mar 08, 2017 8:36 am

Britkid wrote:My wife brought me one of those fancy little magnesium firestarters as a present, for use on my occasional slightly mad mountain trips. I figured I'd try it out at home first, but couldn't get it to do anything, even after at least half an hour of trying in zero winds and perfect light. I can get the sparks to repeatedly hit the magnesium shavings, but nothing happens, either it's a waste of space, or I'm just useless. Anyway, if the end of the world comes, I'm basically screwed.
Yea, really of all the fire starters they sell on the market, I would almost be more inclined to do the stick rubbing trick before depending on the sparky fire starters. which the whole rubbing the sticks together sucks, but it has at least some 50,000+ years of product testing over any fire starter on the market. something to be said for starting a small coal to work up to a bigger fire, even in bad conditions.

First line of defense, lot's of bic lighters. I would depend on the bic even over the couple of zippos I keep in my emergency kit. Constantly needing to be refueled, and so on.

Until I can start a camp fire with a star trek phaser, I am going to stick to a bic lighters unless forced to do it some other way.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

Post Reply