Brexit

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john
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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Thu Oct 13, 2016 8:49 pm

Billhere wrote:I don't regard Pot Noodles or Ben and Jerries as staples of the British diet so don't buy it, and as for Marmite a jar lasts twelve months in this house. I am the only who smears it on the toast and then eats it between pursed lips. If you haven't tried it, it is brown, and very salty, and if have it too thick you will have a thirst all day. There are no figures mentioned, but it appears ASDA (owned by Walmart) also came to some form of deal with Unilever.

My wife bought Hellmans Mayonnaise, another of Unilevers products in the dispute with Tescos, from Lidl's this afternoon at a price cheaper than the other supermarkets so I wonder just how real it all was.
Appreciate your input. I'm afraid I have tried Marmite. :)

Would be interesting to know if the Unilever price differentials, charged to Tesco and Lidl's, are the same pre and post dispute. Presumably, the primary reason Lidl's is able to consistently underprice the big chain supemarkets is because of lower overhead costs and by stocking fewer items. :?:
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

Billhere
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Re: Brexit

Post by Billhere » Fri Oct 14, 2016 5:54 am

Yes, my wife shops at Lidls's for the pricing because it is always cheaper than the other major supermarkets, and is located on the edge of an industrial trading estate so not in the best spot if you like. Their range is limited but then how many choices of something like baked beans or mayonnaise do you want. Lidl's might offer two, the majors several. Tescos is our nearest shop but we only go there rarely.

Also their fruit and veg is up to 50% cheaper, and they have just introduced an in shop bakery where their products and at least 1/3 cheaper than the others. My limited visits to Aldi (the other German chain) is similar. The bigger player supermarkets have been hit badly, and even their own range of foodstuffs are more expensive.

Both those supermarket chains are run by brothers who fell out some years ago if you believe the folklore, started up their supermarkets and are in competition with each other. The only difference I can see is that Aldi tend to build open, spacious new build premises, and Lidl's tend to stick to the low cost recycled shops. Where they are now used to be a DIY store. According to their staff they are notorious tightwads so that may account for the low prices.

Funnily enough Aldi tend to recruit British staff, Lidl's are from all over the place, Europe, Africa etc. Their graduate Management schemes are well paid, but I was told they wring every pennies worth out of them which would account for the ever changing staff.

Also Lidl's support our local model railroad club at our annual show with a donation towards the catering costs, so they are generally good eggs in my view ! The others didn't want to know.

john
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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Fri Oct 14, 2016 3:15 pm

Billhere wrote:Yes, my wife shops at Lidls's for the pricing because it is always cheaper than the other major supermarkets, and is located on the edge of an industrial trading estate so not in the best spot if you like. Their range is limited but then how many choices of something like baked beans or mayonnaise do you want. Lidl's might offer two, the majors several. Tescos is our nearest shop but we only go there rarely.

Also their fruit and veg is up to 50% cheaper, and they have just introduced an in shop bakery where their products and at least 1/3 cheaper than the others. My limited visits to Aldi (the other German chain) is similar. The bigger player supermarkets have been hit badly, and even their own range of foodstuffs are more expensive.

Both those supermarket chains are run by brothers who fell out some years ago if you believe the folklore, started up their supermarkets and are in competition with each other. The only difference I can see is that Aldi tend to build open, spacious new build premises, and Lidl's tend to stick to the low cost recycled shops. Where they are now used to be a DIY store. According to their staff they are notorious tightwads so that may account for the low prices.

Funnily enough Aldi tend to recruit British staff, Lidl's are from all over the place, Europe, Africa etc. Their graduate Management schemes are well paid, but I was told they wring every pennies worth out of them which would account for the ever changing staff.

Also Lidl's support our local model railroad club at our annual show with a donation towards the catering costs, so they are generally good eggs in my view ! The others didn't want to know.
Sounds like Lidl is the ideal store for your food shopping needs. Indeed, how many choices does one need?

Actually, the owners of Aldi and Lidl are not related...you may be thinking of Puma and Adidas, which were founded by two German brothers. BTW, Trader Joe's the US grocery store chain (choice for many Americans, particularly the more affluent millennials) is owned by Aldi.

Smart business acumen on the part of Lidl. :)
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

HybridAmbassador
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Re: Brexit

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Oct 14, 2016 4:27 pm

john wrote:
Billhere wrote:Yes, my wife shops at Lidls's for the pricing because it is always cheaper than the other major supermarkets, and is located on the edge of an industrial trading estate so not in the best spot if you like. Their range is limited but then how many choices of something like baked beans or mayonnaise do you want. Lidl's might offer two, the majors several. Tescos is our nearest shop but we only go there rarely.

Also their fruit and veg is up to 50% cheaper, and they have just introduced an in shop bakery where their products and at least 1/3 cheaper than the others. My limited visits to Aldi (the other German chain) is similar. The bigger player supermarkets have been hit badly, and even their own range of foodstuffs are more expensive.

Both those supermarket chains are run by brothers who fell out some years ago if you believe the folklore, started up their supermarkets and are in competition with each other. The only difference I can see is that Aldi tend to build open, spacious new build premises, and Lidl's tend to stick to the low cost recycled shops. Where they are now used to be a DIY store. According to their staff they are notorious tightwads so that may account for the low prices.

Funnily enough Aldi tend to recruit British staff, Lidl's are from all over the place, Europe, Africa etc. Their graduate Management schemes are well paid, but I was told they wring every pennies worth out of them which would account for the ever changing staff.

Also Lidl's support our local model railroad club at our annual show with a donation towards the catering costs, so they are generally good eggs in my view ! The others didn't want to know.
Sounds like Lidl is the ideal store for your food shopping needs. Indeed, how many choices does one need?

Actually, the owners of Aldi and Lidl are not related...you may be thinking of Puma and Adidas, which were founded by two German brothers. BTW, Trader Joe's the US grocery store chain (choice for many Americans, particularly the more affluent millennials) is owned by Aldi.

Smart business acumen on the part of Lidl.
BTW, Trader Joe's the US grocery store chain (choice for many Americans, particularly the more affluent millennials) is owned by Aldi.
Oh I thought Trader Joe's owned by Al Gore...
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john
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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Fri Oct 14, 2016 6:34 pm

HybridAmbassador wrote:

BTW, Trader Joe's the US grocery store chain (choice for many Americans, particularly the more affluent millennials) is owned by Aldi.

Oh I thought Trader Joe's owned by Al Gore...
The first two letters are the same though. :wink:
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

john
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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Thu Oct 27, 2016 9:38 pm

Interesting new poll results...

What would make Leave voters change their mind about Brexit?
https://yougov.co.uk/news/2016/10/27/wh ... -mind-abo/
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

Billhere
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Re: Brexit

Post by Billhere » Fri Oct 28, 2016 7:58 pm

A little more information might help. I am afraid many got swept along by Boris and his friends, and by Nigel Farage and his UKIP party, who seem to have imploded in the last couple of weeks. They seem to change leaders or potential leaders at about the same rate that I change my socks.

There is no doubt about it the whole thing was badly handled by both sides right from the start, the assumption being that the result was going to be rather different to what actually happened.

The whole thing was about as badly handled as the headline photo in that article. It shows a shop closing down. Yes indeed, it was the British Home Stores, a bit of an institution in this country, which was sold to a greedy, coniving millionaire who seems to have asset stripped the firm, and then sold it for £1 to a bankrupt failed entrepreneur. In the meantime the company pension went from some millions in the black to over £571 million in the red. Said owner took over £400 million in profits, bonuses and anything else you can think of before selling it off. All that is in his wifes name who shares his property in Monaco, a tax haven.

So you could say that that photo has as much relevance to Brexit as the blustering we heard by those Brexiteers who changed their minds after the event, disapeared for a few weeks and then bounced back as if nothing had happened leaving a lot of very bewildered people wondering what on earth they had voted for.

It might start of bite when the price to of tea goes up, as has been threatened by a major producer just today.

john
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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Fri Oct 28, 2016 8:34 pm

Billhere wrote:A little more information might help. I am afraid many got swept along by Boris and his friends, and by Nigel Farage and his UKIP party, who seem to have imploded in the last couple of weeks. They seem to change leaders or potential leaders at about the same rate that I change my socks.

There is no doubt about it the whole thing was badly handled by both sides right from the start, the assumption being that the result was going to be rather different to what actually happened.

The whole thing was about as badly handled as the headline photo in that article. It shows a shop closing down. Yes indeed, it was the British Home Stores, a bit of an institution in this country, which was sold to a greedy, coniving millionaire who seems to have asset stripped the firm, and then sold it for £1 to a bankrupt failed entrepreneur. In the meantime the company pension went from some millions in the black to over £571 million in the red. Said owner took over £400 million in profits, bonuses and anything else you can think of before selling it off. All that is in his wifes name who shares his property in Monaco, a tax haven.

So you could say that that photo has as much relevance to Brexit as the blustering we heard by those Brexiteers who changed their minds after the event, disapeared for a few weeks and then bounced back as if nothing had happened leaving a lot of very bewildered people wondering what on earth they had voted for.

It might start of bite when the price to of tea goes up, as has been threatened by a major producer just today.
Bill, thanks for providing your perspective. I understand Morrison's has raised the price of Marmite by 12% and that a number of supermarkets have raised prices on many other Unilever products.
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

Billhere
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Re: Brexit

Post by Billhere » Fri Oct 28, 2016 9:02 pm

I wouldn't know, the nearest Morrison's is fifteen miles away from us, so we don't go there, and we only shop for specific items at the likes of Sainsburys and Tescos.

My wife continues to shop at Lidls where prices have not risen, or at Costcos where some items are considerably cheaper than the traditional larger supermarket chains anyway, as well as being a bit better quality in my opinion.

Things are starting to go up, petrol is about £1.16 ($1.41) a litre today, and seems to rise weekly.

I am afraid if anybody thought we were just going to leave and carry on just as before never really thought it through, it was the immigration issue that swung it really. Just an interesting aside I was reading that in Rumania over 71,000 have emigrated so far this year into other parts of the EU, so much so that refugees from Syria etc are now taking on the more mundane jobs there because there is nobody to do them !

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Re: Brexit

Post by john » Sat Oct 29, 2016 12:09 am

Billhere wrote:I wouldn't know, the nearest Morrison's is fifteen miles away from us, so we don't go there, and we only shop for specific items at the likes of Sainsburys and Tescos.

My wife continues to shop at Lidls where prices have not risen, or at Costcos where some items are considerably cheaper than the traditional larger supermarket chains anyway, as well as being a bit better quality in my opinion.

Things are starting to go up, petrol is about £1.16 ($1.41) a litre today, and seems to rise weekly.

I am afraid if anybody thought we were just going to leave and carry on just as before never really thought it through, it was the immigration issue that swung it really. Just an interesting aside I was reading that in Rumania over 71,000 have emigrated so far this year into other parts of the EU, so much so that refugees from Syria etc are now taking on the more mundane jobs there because there is nobody to do them !
Lower prices is undoubtedly the principle reason why Lidl and Aldi have continued to increase their year-over-year market share at the expense of the major supermarket chains.

While higher consumer prices are apparently connected to the Brexit decision it doesn't explain the increase in petrol prices.

Indeed, the decision to vote Leave was more emotional than rational. Interesting comments about Romanian emigration and its consequences.
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

Billhere
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Re: Brexit

Post by Billhere » Sat Oct 29, 2016 5:11 am

[quote="john
Lower prices is undoubtedly the principle reason why Lidl and Aldi have continued to increase their year-over-year market share at the expense of the major supermarket chains.

While higher consumer prices are apparently connected to the Brexit decision it doesn't explain the increase in petrol prices.

Indeed, the decision to vote Leave was more emotional than rational. Interesting comments about Romanian emigration and its consequences.[/quote]

Tescos and Sainsbury have large superstores, and have land already bought to build more. The plan was for seven between them for next year according to the radio the other day. These have all been cancelled. Aldi and Lidl on the other hand have applications in for a further one hundred stores around the country. That may be the difference in that the larger stores are going out of fashion and people are preferring the smaller more convenient type, many of which are a bit easier to get to than the larger stores, normally located on the outside of town and therefore involving a car journey.

As for fuel, who can say, it was on the way up before the value of the pound fell, and I think will shortly reach its peak of a couple of years ago of £1.30 ($1.59) a litre, and keep going. Good job the use of our family cars are for social use only now rather than commuting any sort of distance for work.

I agree with your last comments. On the tv last night was survey that 25% of a random sample of Poles inb the South of England showed that they were thinking of leaving the UK.

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Re: Brexit

Post by HybridAmbassador » Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:32 pm

Billhere wrote:[quote="john
Lower prices is undoubtedly the principle reason why Lidl and Aldi have continued to increase their year-over-year market share at the expense of the major supermarket chains.

While higher consumer prices are apparently connected to the Brexit decision it doesn't explain the increase in petrol prices.

Indeed, the decision to vote Leave was more emotional than rational. Interesting comments about Romanian emigration and its consequences.
Tescos and Sainsbury have large superstores, and have land already bought to build more. The plan was for seven between them for next year according to the radio the other day. These have all been cancelled. Aldi and Lidl on the other hand have applications in for a further one hundred stores around the country. That may be the difference in that the larger stores are going out of fashion and people are preferring the smaller more convenient type, many of which are a bit easier to get to than the larger stores, normally located on the outside of town and therefore involving a car journey.

As for fuel, who can say, it was on the way up before the value of the pound fell, and I think will shortly reach its peak of a couple of years ago of £1.30 ($1.59) a litre, and keep going. Good job the use of our family cars are for social use only now rather than commuting any sort of distance for work.

I agree with your last comments. On the tv last night was survey that 25% of a random sample of Poles inb the South of England showed that they were thinking of leaving the UK.[/quote]
As for fuel, who can say, it was on the way up before the value of the pound fell, and I think will shortly reach its peak of a couple of years ago of £1.30 ($1.59) a litre, and keep going. Good job the use of our family cars are for social use only now rather than commuting any sort of distance for work.
Billhere, is your family vehicle a Diesel power? I read all over EU, the Diesel powered cars is in decline?
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