Welcome to the Failure Age!

Anything at all (keep it clean) goes here that does not fit in to any of the other forums.

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john
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Welcome to the Failure Age!

Post by john » Sat Nov 22, 2014 1:17 pm

My younger daughter send me the following article without comment. Hmmm? Definitely worth a read!

Welcome to the Failure Age!

In this economy, losers will be the biggest winners.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/16/magaz ... =Email_r=0
One must care about a world one will not see.
--- Bertrand Russell

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ExpatBob
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Re: Welcome to the Failure Age!

Post by ExpatBob » Sat Nov 22, 2014 3:37 pm

War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength.

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admin
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Re: Welcome to the Failure Age!

Post by admin » Sat Nov 22, 2014 7:23 pm

On the one hand that article was an interesting read, but on the other hand I am not sure it really said anything about anything. I think there was some sort of thesis to it, but not sure. Something like 'the world is changing'. not sure how insightful that is, but anyway...

one of the reasons I am against the whole idea of programs like Chile start-up, is that a start up needs to be allowed to fail as well as succeed. Giving corporate well fair to a small business with a bad idea, is a a bad idea. The idea that Chile was actively importing bad ideas (the good ones would have made it without the program), was just moronic. It is the business equivalent of the soccer games where all the kids are winners, or more like, a soccer game where the losing team get's the trophy.

What is it like 1 in 7 new businesses fail, and that is not a new problem; but, to get solid sustainable businesses you need to let them fail, fail early, and fail big. Not throw artificial life support systems at them, before anyone even knows if they are viable. The business might not be viable, but failed start-ups, do produce a few wiser and more experienced managers and owners that can put that experience to work on the next project that might have a better chance at making it. It also helps quickly sort out those that should not be running their own businesses at all. It is not for everyone.
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frozen-north
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Re: Welcome to the Failure Age!

Post by frozen-north » Sat Nov 22, 2014 7:43 pm

admin wrote:
I think there was some sort of thesis to it, but not sure.
I am not sure either what the writer was getting at, but what bothered me most was the dumping together of unrelated facts as if that made it sound more impressive.
By the 1970s, the impact of computers was greatest in lower-skilled, lower-paid jobs. Factory workers competed with computer-run machines; secretaries and bookkeepers saw their jobs eliminated by desktop software.
I don't remember this wonderful desktop software from the 1970's.
Celebrated corporate-research departments at Bell Labs, DuPont and Xerox...

Corporate leaders weren’t stupid. .... Economic stability allowed millions more people to forgo many of the risk-mitigation strategies that had been in place for millenniums. Family size plummeted. Many people moved away from arable land (Arizona!). Many young people, most notably young women, saw new forms of economic freedom when they were no longer tied to the routine of frequent childbirth.
How does birth control fit into his narrative?

Ripsigg
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Re: Welcome to the Failure Age!

Post by Ripsigg » Mon Nov 24, 2014 1:21 am

admin wrote:On the one hand that article was an interesting read, but on the other hand I am not sure it really said anything about anything. I think there was some sort of thesis to it, but not sure. Something like 'the world is changing'. not sure how insightful that is, but anyway...

one of the reasons I am against the whole idea of programs like Chile start-up, is that a start up needs to be allowed to fail as well as succeed. Giving corporate well fair to a small business with a bad idea, is a a bad idea. The idea that Chile was actively importing bad ideas (the good ones would have made it without the program), was just moronic. It is the business equivalent of the soccer games where all the kids are winners, or more like, a soccer game where the losing team get's the trophy.

What is it like 1 in 7 new businesses fail, and that is not a new problem; but, to get solid sustainable businesses you need to let them fail, fail early, and fail big. Not throw artificial life support systems at them, before anyone even knows if they are viable. The business might not be viable, but failed start-ups, do produce a few wiser and more experienced managers and owners that can put that experience to work on the next project that might have a better chance at making it. It also helps quickly sort out those that should not be running their own businesses at all. It is not for everyone.
I didn't think that the purpose of Startup Chile was to build successful startups. I thought the idea behind it was to help bring an entrepreneurial culture to Chile. $40,000 for 6 months is peanuts and because of the particulars of temporarily locating to Chile very little of that money is destined for actual investment. I always saw the program as one to foster innovation.

Supporting small business is a win-win. You might call it corporate welfare but I don't. I see no issue in providing office space and tax credits to startups. The real issue is what communities are supporting, innovation or business success. I think the article was trying to make the point that innovation and business success do not always go hand in hand. Communities that want to foster and promote innovation can provide the right kind of tools that can increase the odds of business success and when they intersect, a community can reap the benefits. At my university, if you have an idea you can take it to the incubator and get advice and assistance that may eventually be small funding, office space, etc.

Anyone observing startups over the last 20 years should be able to recognize that the only difference between a good idea and a bad idea is success. With the extremely high rate of failure among tech startups, calling something a bad idea doesn't make you a prognosticator. A true prognosticator is someone who can predict which "bad" idea is truly a good idea.

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