Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

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Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by no country for young men » Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:37 am

Looking for comments on seaweed harvesting as a business.

Market: seaweed for culinary use, primarily in Asia, for nutraceuticals and as food additives.

Any companies doing this (wild harvesting or mariculture) in Chile?

Is seaweed used in significant quantities in Chilean cuisine (or any other Latin American cuisine)?

How regulated is harvesting plant life from the sea?

How far does private ownership extend? (e.g. to high tide line, different for open ocean vs. estuaries, etc.)

Are fishermen generally independent operators?

Are most estuarine systems clean in terms of pollution?
------------------------

Shoot holes in it please.

Thanks.

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Fri Feb 04, 2011 1:55 am

Chileans use cochayuyo and nalca.... Cochayuyo is tubular. I personally hate it. Makes me gag. Don't know if the seaweed used in Chile food wise would fly in Japan.... I would think it would be fairly cheap to harvest in Asia. As for using it in other ways I don't know. I do know they sell cochayuyo capsules..... Supposedly as a slimming agent....
This article:
http://www.radiobiobio.cl/2010/08/18/ex ... -en-talca/
seems to imply that they are already exploiting cochayuyo for the Asian market to the point of it being in short supply. The Japanese basically vacuum the sea and use everything. So I suppose seaweed is processed as well.

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by nwdiver » Fri Feb 04, 2011 2:53 pm

Several forms of alga are harvested commercially in the south for human consumption and alginates. They use enhancement not direct culture for the Gracilaria forms. Not big business but done at an artisanal level it adds to the fisher folks incomes.
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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by bearshapedsphere » Fri Feb 04, 2011 3:22 pm

Nalca is a rhubarb-like stem of a (land) plant. Perhaps you meant luche? I don't have answers to the rest of these questions, but we eat cochayuyo, and when washed well and prepared, it has a dried-reconstituted-mushroom type texture, kind of slippery. Luche people put in soup, but I like it rinsed and dried and crumbled over rice.
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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by PenquistaDeCorazon » Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:15 pm

bearshapedsphere wrote:Nalca is a rhubarb-like stem of a (land) plant. Perhaps you meant luche? I don't have answers to the rest of these questions, but we eat cochayuyo, and when washed well and prepared, it has a dried-reconstituted-mushroom type texture, kind of slippery. Luche people put in soup, but I like it rinsed and dried and crumbled over rice.
Duh.... My bad. U r right. I used to eat Nalca in Coyhaique..... Luche is what I meant to say..... Never touch the stuff.... thanks :D

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by regioncentralX » Fri Feb 04, 2011 4:41 pm

Cochayuyo in short supply? Doesn't seem like it on the central coast as it continues to be sold very cheap. Stuff washes up on the beach and I've seen a Chilean or two find a dried one and munch on it.

Many years ago on a relatively expensive muti-day small boat fiord-island tour as we were cruising along the shore of one of the small isolated islands off of Chiloe, I saw the stuff being collected and drying on the rocks for eventual export to Japan.

As for eating, the stuff is high in trace minerals that many modern diets lack and is full of glutamate which can be used for flavor enhancement in soup bases and such.
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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by maxine » Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:28 pm

Can't you use algae to produce bio diesel?

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by nwdiver » Fri Feb 04, 2011 8:44 pm

The name algae commonly used for small unicellular organisms and alga (the singular) commonly used for the large multicellular forms. It is several of the tiny unicellular forms that produce oils that can be converted into bio diesel, not the large marcopytes that produce nori (filamentous form), cochayuyo (a large bull kelp) and luche (a gracilaria).
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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by no country for young men » Sat Feb 05, 2011 2:56 pm

Sounds like other than some drying racks in one location, no one has seen any seaweed cultivation operations as one would see in Japan - large areas set off for growing, harvesting and drying.

Dud or opportunity?

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by no country for young men » Sun Feb 06, 2011 11:23 pm

Thanks. Good help.

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by no country for young men » Sun Feb 06, 2011 11:27 pm

patagoniax wrote:
maxine wrote:Can't you use algae to produce bio diesel?
Not so long ago I did some minor work for the Chilean Ministry of Foreign affairs on an aspect of this very topic. It involves the use of certain micro-organisms found in Antarctica to produce not just any old biodiesel, but a type that features an essential low-temperature antifreeze characteristic. When the same organisms are brought to a more temperate location, they lose the ability to produce this feature for the biodiesel. The short potential growing season on the Antarctic peninsula limits the amount of biodiesel that can be produced in this manner, but there is some possibility of using the organisms to not just generate a portion of the needed fuel for base operations, but also to consume some of the waste products that the base produces.

English language version of a summary http://www.inach.cl/InachWebNeo/CONTROL ... ploy/6.pdf

BIODIESEL: A GREEN ALTERNATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION IN ANTARCTIC BASES
Principal investigator: Pedro CID-AGÜERO, Dirección de Programas Antárticos, Universidad de Magallanes.

I still can't get them to stop referring to researchers as "investigators" but oh well. Welcome to Chile.

Looked through the doc, must appreciated.

And another step off topic. Wondering since you participated in this report and live way down there. do you know where is the krill fishery and does Chile participate in it?

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Re: Harvesting Ocean Products like Seaweed

Post by no country for young men » Mon Feb 07, 2011 1:00 am

patagoniax wrote:[Some economic data for you http://www.sea-world.com/ifop/exportaci ... _algas.htm]
$US1M/month for kelp.

Guessing this was a Chilean effort rather than established by Japanese companies?

off topic a bit:

I am getting the feeling so far that a lot of export was set up by Chileans.

Timber, fresh fruit, wine, all Chilean entrepreneurs?

Copper and other mining... pals of Nixon I guess, but I assume these are mostly now Chilean dominated?

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