Security Concerns

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HybridAmbassador
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by HybridAmbassador » Thu Feb 01, 2018 4:49 pm

David_Bro post_id=181411 time=1517461218 user_id=20845]
No one has said anything about a big dog or dogs----we had two but you have to train them to only eat from you and out of their own dish as bad guys will just poison meat and through it over the fence-----don't think that you are not being cased all the time----bad guys and even neighbors will watch your routine and hand it off to whomever so its simple to watch your schedule and habits and that is more than half the battle, domestic help is an issue as well with knowing your routine-----The roof is the generally the weakest point in a Chilean house so its usually kids they drop in and then unlock the door or through an unlocked or un barred window on the second floor-----

[/quote]
The roof is the generally the weakest point in a Chilean house so its usually kids they drop in and then unlock the door or through an unlocked or un barred window on the second floor-----
Yeah, I dig that. Once visited EEUU down in San Antonio area. From high up his place ventured onto his balcony overlooking the port area. Looked down and seen many houses roofed with zinc panels. Those panels are secured by nails and very easy to pull those metal panels off and drop in to the houses.
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bobserb
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by bobserb » Thu Feb 01, 2018 6:22 pm

Yeah, I dig that. Once visited EEUU down in San Antonio area. From high up his place ventured onto his balcony overlooking the port area. Looked down and seen many houses roofed with zinc panels. Those panels are secured by nails and very easy to pull those metal panels off and drop in to the houses.
[/quote]

Those panels are secured by screws that look like this:
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hlf2888
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by hlf2888 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:41 am

There are opportunistic crimes in every country. I would be much more afraid of the angry American shooting into a crowd or the angry teenager slaughtering his classmates, or the angry president starting a nuclear war than anything here.

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fraggle092
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by fraggle092 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:51 am

Gloria wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:54 pm
Armed guards? Still won't work. What's needed is a true Charles Bronson to "teach them a lesson they'll never remember" :lol:
Armed private guards are not permitted in Chile anyway. Apart from Transportes de Valores,firms like Brinks and Prosegur.
Just as well.....
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Dosedmonkey
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by Dosedmonkey » Sun Feb 25, 2018 6:59 pm

Bollards were fitted outside most shops in the United Kingdom in the 90s after ram raids became the normal. I couldn't believe it when I came here and they didn't even have them in front of cash machine entrances and petrol garages, although that's mostly changed. So its a logical affordable step to make.

As for security lighting, it does deter tremendously, especially when your neighbours don't have any. Who will they prefer to rob from. I fitted a lot of additional lighting, some sensors, and I never got broken in to despite some of my neighbours in the condominium did. I also had a couple of dogs, which add to your defence level. More layers you have, less likely they will want to steal from you. The organised groups will tag walls with spray paint near properties saying what security a property has. If you get tagged inform the police.

There was a law suit out on one house in my condominium because they went the full hog and got some big fencing around their house, isolating themselves from the rest of the condominium.

As for robberies of cars when entering a property, one of my neighbours in Pedro Fontova was killed a few years ago, she got out the car not realising the guys had gotten through the gate before it closed, she got entangled in her seat belt, and dragged down the road. Always be vigilant id your in a city.

I also remember someone parked their car out the front of the apartments to just quickly grab something, come back 30 minutes later and their car was gone. Not such a big deal, but may as well have used the car park.

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Re: Security Concerns

Post by admin » Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:30 am

fraggle092 wrote:
Thu Feb 01, 2018 1:07 am
tiagoabner wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 10:12 pm
CAT-5 cables go for USD $35 per 1000ft/300m, so $0.12 per meter. Even at a 100% import prices mark up, that's $0.25 per meter, or $250 per kilometer. With all due respect, if you're monitoring a condo large enough for CAT-5 prices to be a factor, then you should have a much higher security budget to even begin with, considering the reported crime rates.
How are you going to run all that cable, string it up among the trees? Or tie-wrap it to fences?
Since this is a security system perhaps running the cables in metallic conduit or even burying them would be better.
But direct burial and outdoor grade cable is considerably more expensive that the prices you quote, and conduit isn't cheap either. That's where the installation costs come in, labour as well as materials. Dont forget the PoE switches, distribution boxes and cabinets,and IR or conventional illuminators either. And backhoe rental.
CAT-5 has a range limit of about 100 meters, before it needs a repeater. Although I have seen runs longer than that, seem to work.

Wireless is faster, easier, cheaper to maintain in an outdoor environment anyway.
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fraggle092
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by fraggle092 » Mon Feb 26, 2018 9:51 am

admin wrote:
Mon Feb 26, 2018 7:30 am
[Wireless is faster, easier, cheaper to maintain in an outdoor environment anyway.
I wondered when somebody would bring that up...
Professional cameras, like this one dont even include wifi. At around USD $800 a pop, its not because they can't afford to.

Speed is not an issue, even megapixel cameras only run at around 5Mb/s these days. More important is QoS.
Wireless is "bursty" and has latency (Good white paper from Axis)
Real-time video systems don't like that, especially where TCP connections are involved, (that is also why voip RTP uses UDP packets btw) WiFi is also prone to interference, deliberate or accidental, and has well-known security issues. It was never meant to be a long-range system. The accepted way to implement a larger professional system is via fibre optic with local media converters.

You dont have to look too far in Chile to see examples of this, most town centre camera systems are done this way. Regardless of what type of video connection is used, still need to get power to the camera and its supplemental illumination if required. Battery power, however elaborately sourced, decreases reliability.

My point is that for anything larger than a domestic environment, this type of surveillance can't be done on the cheap.
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Dosedmonkey
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by Dosedmonkey » Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:56 am

If you got to run power to the camera, isn't wiring it easier in houses. Obviously industrially you'll have power sources all over your property anyway.

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fraggle092
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Re: Security Concerns

Post by fraggle092 » Tue Feb 27, 2018 11:00 am

Dosedmonkey wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:56 am
If you got to run power to the camera, isn't wiring it easier in houses. Obviously industrially you'll have power sources all over your property anyway.
My original reply was to do with cctv in a condominio where distances are greater and power may not be available.
A wired domestic installation using PoE is by far the best way to go for reliability.

Its much easier in smaller or self-contained installations, for instance PoE switches allow cameras to be powered via 48volts through the ethernet cable, so no separate power run is needed. I run wifi APs and voip phones the same way. One cable does it all, data and power.

As for domestic, anything goes. Cheap and easy is what people want. WiFi, battery power, etc.
Pan para hoy y hambre para mañana IMO.
But that type of installation doesn't scale up at all, that is what I was trying to get across.

One less obvious advantage of using PoE is that cheap Chinese IP cameras tend to hang. The only way to reboot them is to power cycle, not so easy when the offender is mounted outside, two stories up under the roof eaves....as opposed to cycling the port power through the switch web page or even just momentarily disconnecting the ethernet cable. Been there....
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