Prefab Homes

Buying, Selling, Building, Tax issues, anything regarding real estate or properties in Chile.
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copfish
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Post by copfish » Sun Oct 21, 2007 3:08 pm

Thanks for the address of Sodimac. I actually had been in one in La Serena and in Santiago , looks like a Home Depot but less organized but still had most everything.

I think I read in one of the posts that steel stud use is now being used which does solve the crooked, undry lumber issue and they're not hard to use.

I plan to use a shipping container on site to avoid thief and dry lockup storage. I use several here and just drop one near the power pole and keep a small air conditioner that keeps the humidity low. Afterwards they make nice storage space for the car when gone and still lots of room for other things.

RWS
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Post by RWS » Sun Oct 21, 2007 8:44 pm

copfish wrote:. . . . I plan to use a shipping container on site to avoid thief and dry lockup storage. I use several here and just drop one near the power pole and keep a small air conditioner that keeps the humidity low. Afterwards they make nice storage space for the car when gone and still lots of room for other things.
May I ask how you obtained a shipping container? (I assume you're talking about one of those huge, twenty- to forty-foot-long boxes used for international maritime shipment.) I anticipate arriving in Chile in February of 2009 but not bringing most of my possessions (by volume, chiefly books) until a year later. Having one here, then there, could prove very useful for me.

Thanks!

copfish
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Post by copfish » Sun Oct 21, 2007 11:07 pm

You can just buy one. They come in several sizes depending on your needs. Also they come in Steel which is the cheapest and most common. Aluminum which is more money and Fiberglass. I have used all of these type's. As far as sizes the most common are the 40 foot long containers, next is 20 footers, the 10 foot ones but these are hard to find but still they are out there. Price... well for the last 40 footer in steel I paid $2800. delivered to my location which was 85 miles from the port. It was watertight and had only a little rust here and there. I sandblasted this one and painted it with coal tar epoxy and this will last about 15 years with no worries. The sandblasting was $1100. and the coating was $950. so I have some money in it and did the work myself ,but its totally lockable, dry, and big.

You should have no problem in finding one anywhere. In the states they can be found in the auto trader or other classifieds. Just make sure you find a place that has hundreds of them to choose from and you can get a better unit at a better price. Also make sure it not a leaker, cause it will cost money to repair and unless you can weld and blast and paint it better to spend a little more up front.

The reason I sandblasted the last one I bought was its going on a small island I have and its saltwater so I wanted little maitanance and one that is steel is also heavy and I'm placing it only 4 feet off the ground on concrete poured piers in an area that gets some flooding. The island is a little remote and fiberglass burns and aluminum is valuable as scrap so thats why I went with steel too as I have had some vandalizum.

This one will also have a gabled roof put on (metal roof) so I can catch rain water for irrigation and for two solar panels that will supply a little power for thing like small pumps etc.

Oh, these containers also have real nice hardwood floors, usually oak and can be belt sanded and clear coated to look great.

They also make refrigerated containers also and they sell them without the refrigeration units. The advantage usually is that they are insulated very well and have aluminum floors with slots for water to drain off of when used in transporting cold stuff.

I have a friend that has one of these ex-refrigerated one's on a work barge and uses part of it as an office and uses a 12000 btu a/c unit and it will freeze you out, thyats how well they are insulated.

RWS
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Post by RWS » Sun Oct 21, 2007 11:58 pm

Very interesting, Copfish!

I'd suppose that shipping lines would accept and move the packed container as readily as they would their own. As you point out, the container could prove useful in Chile as, in essence, a prefabricated storage building.

Again, thanks for information that I wouldn't otherwise have had.

Excalibur
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Post by Excalibur » Mon Oct 22, 2007 3:54 pm

RWS wrote: I'd suppose that shipping lines would accept and move the packed container as readily as they would their own. As you point out, the container could prove useful in Chile as, in essence, a prefabricated storage building.
Yes, they would.

The combination of internationally accepted standard sizes, their structural strenght, their generous volume ( especially the 40' )
and their general practicality, make them very useful indeed, both as "storage boxes", and for all sorts of other purposes as well.

On top of that, they are available in the millions, all over the world, so they are not difficult to get hold of, or sell, when the time comes, after they have served their intended purpose.

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Post by admin » Mon Oct 22, 2007 5:53 pm

I typically see advertising for one or two companies in the Sunday papers in Chile that sell containers, including ones converted to like portable offices and such. No idea what they go for, but will see if I can track one down and call them for a quote.

copfish
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Post by copfish » Mon Oct 22, 2007 8:37 pm

RWS
I wonder if when you do ship your stuff to Chile would you indicate that the container was yours? maybe not if they don't ask, also wonder what the import tax would be on a container? I'd keep your reciept when you purchase it in case there is tax due.

copfish
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Post by copfish » Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:03 pm

I had a friend that used two 20 ft. containers (steel) and filled them with everything to build a house and shipped them to Nicaragua (corn island) and set them apart 12 ft. and built on top of the two containers his vacation home. It was really cool and he used local stone to build on the outside of the containers to make it look like the home was built on a stone first floor. He shipped a dune buggy in the container also and when he was back in the states he just locked up the containers and had a neighbor keep an eye on the place. I'll look for a photo of it. By keeping 12 ft. between the containers he had a nice shaddy place to work and made a nice carport. He had turned me on to the shipping containers about 15 yrs ago and I've used them on many projects. He first saw someone that had used several of them stacked on each other and used as an office and home in Orlando FL. I'm sure that many people across the world have make interesting use of them also.

Another friend buried one on his land and uses it as a tornado shelter. They do have many good uses and are very durable, naturally, and they can be made to look nice with little work.

Shipping companies have no problem coming to your place and snatching it up and delivering it to Chile or anywhere else. I have one time needed a crane service to come out to load it onto the truck to get it to the port, but usually no problems.

Normally a 40 footer will max out around 70,000.lbs. including the container and some a little more a some a little less depending on the type.

RWS
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Post by RWS » Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:41 pm

Copfish, I want to thank you for much interesting (and, doubtless, eventually useful) information.

I suppose that my goods total not more than 20,000 lbs. (books are heavy!), but, regrettably, I doubt that I can cram all into a twenty-foot container. As a thirty-footer doesn't exist, I suppose that I must use a forty-foot one.

At least I've the consolation of knowing I could put the thing to good use afterward!

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Post by RWS » Mon Oct 22, 2007 9:45 pm

P.S. -- Good advice, Copfish, about keeping proof of ownership and cost of acquisition. Not that I've any enthusiasm for accumulating more stuff! -- RWS

Excalibur
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Post by Excalibur » Tue Oct 23, 2007 9:29 am

copfish wrote:RWS
I wonder if when you do ship your stuff to Chile would you indicate that the container was yours? maybe not if they don't ask, also wonder what the import tax would be on a container? I'd keep your reciept when you purchase it in case there is tax due.
There is a simple way to find answers to these questions, and it is tocontact an international shipping company; they will provide quotationsand general advise to anyone interested in shipping a container abroad,with the hope of securing a future customer, but one does not need to have any particular commitment with any of them, in order to ask for information in order to take a decision about a future shipment.

Because this is what they do for a living, they know all the technicalitiesconcerning import and export, and all the relevant taxes and duties to be paid at the other end, on a country by country basis, so they can basically help with any aspect involved.

Normally a shipping company would have an agent at the country ofdestination, with whom they would liaise, who takes care of all the customs formalities and then deliver the container to the desired address and, because the containers would normally be the property of a shipping line, they would leave them on site for a certain amount of time, for it to be unloaded, and then pick it up and return it to whatever shipping line owns it, but in the case of a privately owned container, they would just deliver it, and that would be it.

Best thing to do, in my opinion, is to get quotations from 3 or 4 differentshipping companies, not just in order to compare prices, in order to get the best deal, but also to ensure that if one of them overlooks some aspect of the shipment ( especially with regard to import duties or documentation ) someone else might not, so that one knows exactlywhat is required, before going ahead, and avoid any kind of last minute surprise, because this document is missing, or that declaration wasn'tdone properly, etc.

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Post by RWS » Tue Oct 23, 2007 9:58 am

Excellent advice, Excalibur, particularly concerning the importance of obtaining competing quotations from shippers in part to assure that all necessary components of the move (physical transfer, documentary compliance, etc.) have been covered.

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