Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;)

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audeo13
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Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;)

Post by audeo13 » Mon Feb 06, 2012 5:09 pm

Thought I'd post quickly in case anyone was wondering... I know a while back there had been some discussion on this and whether the rumours were true, and they are. You can apply for a temporary visa using common-law status if your significant other is Chilean. We didn't actually mean to do it (We quite enjoy our visa runs to the land of steak and honey lol) but we miscounted and accidentally let my boyfriend's tourist visa run out. Went to the extranjeria in Llolleo to see what we needed to do and the main boss lady herself helped us and insisted we'd be much better off filing for my boyfriend's temporary visa with me signing a notarized document that I was willing to support him while here lol. It's funny because he brings in more $ than me as he's a semi-pro poker player. Anyhow, in terms of showing my income, I just downloaded my banking statements from my Canadian account for the last 6 months (there wasn't much in terms of savings, and an average of $1500 to $2000 going in and out monthly) provided two copies of that, two copies of his passport pages and the 4 passport size photos that they ask for (no idea why, from what I saw they use it to staple to his application, that's it).

The application was authorized in less than a month. They asked me for one more notarized letter stating that we lived together, etc. and after I gave them that, it took a couple days to get the official visa in his passport, which we then took to the PDI who gave us another form which we took to the Registro Civil and applied for his Cedula (ID). They said come back next week to get it, which we did and registered with the PDI the same day. All told, it took just a little over a month and a half and that was because I wasted time.

What's funny is that we're moving back, so we didn't even really need it, but it saves us the trouble of having to do any visa runs for the next little while. We have a friend who's staying with us and is also moving back and he was particularly disgusted by the ease with which this all went down since he's had nothing but trouble since coming to Chile and got screwed out of his last paycheck from a dodgy employer, the works. Them's the breaks I guess.

Anyhow, thought I'd post in case anyone was curious about this or had any questions. Cheers.
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wiscondinavian
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by wiscondinavian » Tue Feb 07, 2012 2:05 am

Where is your significant other from? Australia? I know that Australians tend to get some special visas here because of their open immigration system...

As far as I know, nothing like this exists for Americans... but if your partner is American, I guess I'm wrong!

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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by audeo13 » Tue Feb 07, 2012 9:54 am

He's Canadian, and as far as I recall, nationality didn't really play a factor. We had the department boss helping us because the usual girl was out and I have a feeling had he been American it wouldn't have mattered since she called us American a few times and I had to correct her that we're Canadian. Hard to say, but more than anything it seemed to come down to my notarized statements... Llolleo's extranjeria is also ALOT easier to deal with than others.
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by carica » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:17 am

I've also heard of the same deal in Valparaíso a few years back. In this case the "couple" in question wasn't even a couple. It was a Chilean man and a German woman, and the Chilean was a friend of hers who signed the notarized document stating that he was financially responsible for her. I don't know if Extranjeria knew that they weren't really together or not, but the temporary visa was thus easily achieved.

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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by admin » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:19 am

I would tend to say this is a happy screw-up in your favor rather than a systematic policy shift. Screw-ups are very common these days at immigration. screw-ups in the applicants favor not so much. systematic is even harder to come by. But perhaps they got their act together on the common-law status. Will check to see if they got anything official, before a bunch of gringos go out trolling for a new Chilean girlfriend / boyfriend.
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by StrawberryHeartsForever » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:35 am

Could I ask you how much you paid for the visa? The price for the temporary residence visa is horrendous for Brits at the minute, and I am stuck in a rut as I am finding it hard to get a job so can not afford the visa at present, but without the visa, almost impossible to get a job. I am being supported by my partner at the minute and he is my common law partner, but we don't want to get married just to get the visa if that makes sense. If we were married, the price drops from around US $1500 to $15. Crazy! Any advice would be welcome. Thanks.

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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by zer0nz » Tue Feb 07, 2012 11:37 am

StrawberryHeartsForever wrote:Could I ask you how much you paid for the visa? The price for the temporary residence visa is horrendous for Brits at the minute, and I am stuck in a rut as I am finding it hard to get a job so can not afford the visa at present, but without the visa, almost impossible to get a job. I am being supported by my partner at the minute and he is my common law partner, but we don't want to get married just to get the visa if that makes sense. If we were married, the price drops from around US $1500 to $15. Crazy! Any advice would be welcome. Thanks.
and it all starts :), there you go admin!

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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by audeo13 » Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:06 pm

We paid $65.000 clp but I should point out that this temporary visa stated that I would cover my partners expenses in whole, so it didn't authorize him to work in the country (which honestly, he would never bother trying to work for the crappy wages offered here, makes more playing poker online even if he does yell at the monitor a few times a week :lol: ). She said after the year was up and he applied for his permanent residence, he would obtain work authorization with that. We didn't really care since we want to leave, it just turned out that this ended up being cheaper/more expedient than paying the fine for letting his tourist visa lapse and then going on a visa run two more times before leaving. BTW, she knew we'd decided to leave permanently and still suggested this as a course of action. Said if we changed our minds when we were back in the land of cold and wanted to come back soon, we could apply for an extension on his temporary visa at the consulate in Canada.

Approximately a week after our application was submitted, the PDI came to the house to interview us and verify that we did, indeed, live together and were an actual couple. There was no real warning, they called the cell phone and asked for my boyfriend and told him that they would be stopping by in about an hour. They were very nice, polite, interviewed him and explained that once the application was approved (and they saw no reason it wouldn't), we'd just have to register his new visa with them, get his ID and register that with them as well. Very painless and the head guy in the Extranjeria department at the PDI was the one who came to the house to interview us, so whenever we went to the office he recognized us and made a point of helping us himself. Amazing how easy it to get things done in this country when the officials decide they like you. Totally f*cked, mind you, but welcome to Chile. Can't say I'm sad to go.

@StrawberryHeartsForever do you have no skills you can use to work online? Honestly, I could never justify working here and dealing with the crap that gets dished out after having grown up working in Canada and the US. I know there are shitty employers everywhere... I suppose I was always lucky to have decent bosses and a decent to above average wage more often than not back home, then again, I also worked my ass off so more than earned both my salary and my boss' appreciation. Work ethic is somewhat lacking in this country and from what I've seen, since it's not a familiar concept, you won't necessarily be rewarded for raising the bar. Still though, the pay here is abysmal more often than not and foreigners usually get shafted in their contracts. YMMV but were I you, I'd look into any possible telecommuting options for companies back home if you have any skills in that vein.
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Tue Feb 07, 2012 1:51 pm

So a creative redefinition of "cónyuge" as the TE-1 form specifically states
(En este caso se entenderán por vínculos la relación de hijo, padre, madre o cónyuge de chileno)
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by StrawberryHeartsForever » Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:17 pm

@StrawberryHeartsForever do you have no skills you can use to work online? Honestly, I could never justify working here and dealing with the crap that gets dished out after having grown up working in Canada and the US. I know there are shitty employers everywhere... I suppose I was always lucky to have decent bosses and a decent to above average wage more often than not back home, then again, I also worked my ass off so more than earned both my salary and my boss' appreciation. Work ethic is somewhat lacking in this country and from what I've seen, since it's not a familiar concept, you won't necessarily be rewarded for raising the bar. Still though, the pay here is abysmal more often than not and foreigners usually get shafted in their contracts. YMMV but were I you, I'd look into any possible telecommuting options for companies back home if you have any skills in that vein.[/quote]

Thanks, I will have a look into that for sure.

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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by admin » Tue Feb 07, 2012 3:50 pm

Approximately a week after our application was submitted, the PDI came to the house to interview us and verify that we did, indeed, live together and were an actual couple. There was no real warning, they called the cell phone and asked for my boyfriend and told him that they would be stopping by in about an hour. They were very nice, polite, interviewed him and explained that once the application was approved (and they saw no reason it wouldn't), we'd just have to register his new visa with them, get his ID and register that with them as well.
interesting.

The thing that I would point out to the audiance at home however is that if this is now working, then there might still be a real dif between two common law gringos applying and a gringo and Chilean applying. Even if they accept that, then you will need to produce the income for support. It sometimes takes a while for them to stretch the policy to cover other situations.

We have had cases of people with residency sponsoring other family members such as in the case of a parent or mother in law.
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Re: Temporary visa through common-law status - si se puede ;

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:03 pm

As far as I can determine, audeo13 can confirm, this was a TE-1 deal so a gringo/gringo application would not apply. I read this as an expansion of what a "family" member is especially if a Chilean person takes financial responsibility for that "family" member.

YMMV.

And yes, the Gobernación in Llo Lleo as other gov services in San Antonio are a lot more laid back and friendlier than Santiasco or extensions of that dual classist-flaite POS.
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