Climate changing in Chile

General topics related to Living in Chile
Britkid
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Apr 15, 2019 12:08 pm

Mem, I did some research about SUV safety also and there is some evidence that modern SUVs are safer. The main issue with SUVs, and the reason they only give a perceived but not actual safety advantage, is because any advantage gained by their robustness and large size, is counteracted by their high centre of gravity which causes them to tip over in road accidents and start flipping over. A 2-tonne chunk of metal doing cartwheels is ridiculously dangerous for everyone inside and outside the car. However, it seems that the manufacturers became aware of this and that modern versions have improved this somehow.

So, statements like the one I made above about SUVs "offering little or no net protection to the inhabitants of your own car" are sweeping generalizations. If you do specific research for the model you are planning to buy, you may find some SUVs do offer an overall protection level compared to sedans.

But I still think that this is at the expense of other road users. So I don't agree that "unibody chassis SUVs are not only safer for the occupants but also for the occupants of the other vehicle in a crash". If you're saying that "unibody chassis SUVs" are relatively safer than other SUVs, I can take your word for that. But I can't believe it's safer for me to have a "unibody chassis SUVs" smash into me than a smaller car which is more my argument. Maybe you can share the research.

We do live on dirt roads but only for the last half mile to the house and they are good quality dirt roads. If we sold the SUV, we might lose up to a minute of time from having to drive slowly every time we take a trip out. And occasionally we drive on worse dirt roads and potholed roads. So the SUV case is strong here than US, UK, Europe. However I think we're making too many excuses. The positive side of not having an SUV is a lot of money saved on permiso de circulacion, purchase cost of car, petrol cost.

Julito
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by Julito » Mon Apr 15, 2019 12:39 pm

Electric SUV. I saw the pickup version too somewhere on the net the other day. It has the same incredible performance specs.

https://www.autotrader.com/car-reviews/ ... 4979899394

Britkid
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Apr 15, 2019 1:42 pm

Interesting - 400 mile range for an electric SUV! The only electric SUV in Chile that I know of, the Mitsubishi Outlander, can do about 20-25 miles (it's a PHEV so you are back on regular gas after that distance unless you charge it again before you get home).

A few notes of caution though:
---Small, untested company.
---Claims it will have this car late 2020, no surprise if that goes later.
---Journalists were not even allowed to open the doors and look inside the prototype (a bit suspicious), let alone drive it.
---The only way they can get that range for an SUV is by having a very large battery. That will be heavy and very, very expensive.*
---No chance we'll see this car in Chile any time soon.
---High-end electric SUVs are no better for the environment than your average old petrol sedan, after allowing for the environmental impact in the construction of the car (which is worse for cars with batteries or that size) and the emissions needed to produce the electricity - unless you live in somewhere with a low carbon grid, like France or California, or you are charging the car with solar panels.
---Also stylistically this car looks out of date before it is even launched. Has the lines of a 4 by 4 from the 1990s.

I don't think Tesla needs to be too worried.

EDIT: *Just noticed that they do actually have some prices listed in the article: "$72,500 for the base battery version, while the large battery versions will rise to about $90,000" - the large battery refers to the 400 mile range.

Well at those prices I've about as much chance of affording that car as I have of flying to the moon.

at46
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by at46 » Mon Apr 15, 2019 2:24 pm

Speed freaks clamouring after an electric car should just get themselves an electric scooter. More fun without any consequences. Normal people should familiarize themselves with LPG vehicle technology and start asking for it here in Chile https://gazeo.com/up-to-date/news/2015/ ... ,8607.html

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admin
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by admin » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:49 pm

Britkid wrote:
Mon Apr 15, 2019 12:08 pm
Mem, I did some research about SUV safety also and there is some evidence that modern SUVs are safer. The main issue with SUVs, and the reason they only give a perceived but not actual safety advantage, is because any advantage gained by their robustness and large size, is counteracted by their high centre of gravity which causes them to tip over in road accidents and start flipping over. A 2-tonne chunk of metal doing cartwheels is ridiculously dangerous for everyone inside and outside the car. However, it seems that the manufacturers became aware of this and that modern versions have improved this somehow.

So, statements like the one I made above about SUVs "offering little or no net protection to the inhabitants of your own car" are sweeping generalizations. If you do specific research for the model you are planning to buy, you may find some SUVs do offer an overall protection level compared to sedans.

But I still think that this is at the expense of other road users. So I don't agree that "unibody chassis SUVs are not only safer for the occupants but also for the occupants of the other vehicle in a crash". If you're saying that "unibody chassis SUVs" are relatively safer than other SUVs, I can take your word for that. But I can't believe it's safer for me to have a "unibody chassis SUVs" smash into me than a smaller car which is more my argument. Maybe you can share the research.

We do live on dirt roads but only for the last half mile to the house and they are good quality dirt roads. If we sold the SUV, we might lose up to a minute of time from having to drive slowly every time we take a trip out. And occasionally we drive on worse dirt roads and potholed roads. So the SUV case is strong here than US, UK, Europe. However I think we're making too many excuses. The positive side of not having an SUV is a lot of money saved on permiso de circulacion, purchase cost of car, petrol cost.
I keep meaning to buy some small compact car decales to put on the bumber of my Toyota FJ Cruiser every time one bounces off it, to keep track of the number of compact cars it has "compacted". Three so far (two with me, one with the previous owner), but I am sure there are probably a few others out there that are looking to try and pick a fight with it.

Irony is, two of the three that hit it, while the FJ was parked or stopped.They were pretty much totaled for the attempt. From what i am told, the one that did hit the bumper disintigrated, while only leaving a minor scratch on the bumper.

as for survivability, so far I have only found a few cases of people dying in an FJ cruiser, and seems all were trapped inside when they caught on fire. not the actuel impact. Frame on body, designed with big apillars to be rolled when off roading.
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41southchile
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by 41southchile » Wed May 29, 2019 3:36 pm

So the supposed front that was supposed to deliver 30 mm of rain to Santiago , the first real rain of the year, dissapeared and only a few drops fell. This is becoming a trend now, supposedly going to be a wet winter? If it continues like this Santiago could be heading for their driest year ever, wonder what June and July will bring?
https://www.emol.com/noticias/Nacional/ ... la-RM.html
Comuna Loncotoro Lakes Region Chile

thisisreallycomplicated
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by thisisreallycomplicated » Wed May 29, 2019 11:54 pm

41southchile wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 3:36 pm
So the supposed front that was supposed to deliver 30 mm of rain to Santiago , the first real rain of the year, dissapeared and only a few drops fell. This is becoming a trend now, supposedly going to be a wet winter? If it continues like this Santiago could be heading for their driest year ever, wonder what June and July will bring?
https://www.emol.com/noticias/Nacional/ ... la-RM.html
We got it here in Coquimbo. I think this is the first time I got caught in the rain since I've been here.
“Now it’s conspiracy – they’ve made that something that should not even be entertained for a minute, that powerful people might get together and have a plan. Doesn’t happen, you’re a kook, you’re a conspiracy buff!” – George Carlin

thisisreallycomplicated
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by thisisreallycomplicated » Thu May 30, 2019 5:16 pm

So today the sun was shining, and there were hardly any clouds at all. But it was raining in my yard.
“Now it’s conspiracy – they’ve made that something that should not even be entertained for a minute, that powerful people might get together and have a plan. Doesn’t happen, you’re a kook, you’re a conspiracy buff!” – George Carlin

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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by admin » Thu May 30, 2019 7:52 pm

IMG-20190530-WA0001.jpg
Attachments
IMG-20190530-WA0000.jpg
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by admin » Thu May 30, 2019 7:53 pm

chile is not tornado alley, but they have a few.
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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by admin » Thu May 30, 2019 7:55 pm

what is it with the 8th region?

they have the best natural disasters.
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From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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Re: Climate changing in Chile

Post by admin » Thu May 30, 2019 7:57 pm

in the videos is it interesting to watch those cranes turn towards the tornado and follow it.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
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