electric vehicles in chile

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Britkid
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Re: electric vehicles in chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Jan 21, 2019 12:54 pm

EDIT: This post is out of date. See next post instead.

I went to one of the electric charging points on Copec's own map of them posted in my previous comment to find nothing there and workers confirming nothing there. I went back to the map and they've removed various points that were on there before including the ones needed to get to Concepcion. It looks like someone jumped the gun a bit with the announcement. The announcement if you read it looks like all the points are operational but certainly in at least one case and perhaps others that's not so. So, unclear to me at this point if you can or cannot drive to Concepcion with an electric car. If anyone stops at any Copecs between Concepcion and Santiago, I'd be curious if you see any actually in existence in real life or do they only exist in the PR announcement. I'm guessing the announced ones are at the very least coming soon (within months).
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

Britkid
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Re: electric vehicles in chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Feb 18, 2019 3:24 pm

Someone has now driven from Santiago area to Concepcion and back with an electric car.
Link below has the story in a series of mini video blogs at each stop that might take up to an hour or so to watch all of them.

https://clubautoselectricos.blogspot.co ... LLhzjSr2K0

I'll sum up the key points here though from the video:

On the way from Santiago to Concepcion, everything worked smoothly.

On the way back, there was a problem with a power cut at San Carlos which meant the fast charger couldn't be used until the power came back. The power cut was for the whole area, and meant the fast charger could not be used. However while the power was out, they let him use the mains electricity to charge via generator (it seems that with generator they were able to power a regular electric socket but not the fast charger). It looks like, had there been a power cut all day, he still would have been able to charge overnight and move on the next day. (If the fast chargers don't work, you can still charge an electric car from a regular electric socket, it just takes many hours, perhaps even overnight, instead of some minutes in the fast charger).

There was a second problem with a "fuera de servicio" on the fast charger at San Fernando.If I understood correctly, he charged the electric car from a regular socket here as the fast charger wasn't working. As a result, he had to wait longer to get a smaller amount of charge, and got just enough to reach the next charger, and then left. This would have been to avoid waiting hours and hours to get a full charge at a slower speed. Hope this is making sense.

When he arrived at the electric charging points, there was no one standing near them to assist him in the process, but he was able to get someone when needed. This clearly would have been a tricky trip for someone that didn't speak Spanish.

The fast chargers take 30-40 minutes for a full charge.

Overall, on the way south he probably took a fraction longer than a petrol trip, and on the way back quite a bit longer.

Most of the chargers were for free (he paid at Chillan), but that is just for now that they are free. I think they are all going to charge, but for starters they are allowing some free usage.

The cost is 230 pesos/ kwH for the fast chargers - that is about double the price of regular electricity. That means that when you are driving between Santiago and Concepcion, or anywhere with these fast motorway chargers, you are paying about half the price per mile for fuel as if you drive a petrol/gas car.

(When you have an electric car and are charging at home for example from a regular socket, it is about 75% less pesos per mile as you are using cheaper electricity at a more normal price.)

To pay at the Copec Voltex fast chargers, you have to have a cell phone app and you need an internet connection on your phone to be able to pay. That means if you ran out of credit/data allowance, or had no signal, or had no battery, you would be quite screwed. I am not sure what you would do in this situation. Perhaps they would still let you charge up from the regular socket and you might have to stay hours and hours or overnight? You can't pay by cash or credit card which honestly is just dumb. I hope they change that.

It looks like there are 2 parking spaces next to each electric charging point. I assume that means 2 cars can charge at once.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

Britkid
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Re: electric vehicles in chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Feb 18, 2019 4:27 pm

Britkid wrote:
Thu Jan 10, 2019 1:51 pm
Thanks for sharing this. Good news. The real news here is that you can now drive from Santiago to Concepcion with an electric car, which wasn't possible before.

The other noteworthy thing is that these are fast chargers. 30 minutes or so.

There is one place on the drive with 98km between charging points which is between Chimbarongo and San Rafael and a similar distance (just under) between Chillan and Concepcion. So you need >100km range to be able to do this.

You can see the map here: https://ww2.copec.cl/voltex

It would be nice if Copec could announce their plans for the next few years. I'm still waiting to find out when you can drive anywhere between La Serena (or maybe Valle Elqui) and Puerto Montt (or maybe Chiloe) with an electric car.
I noted above that, on the drive between Santiago and Concepcion, there is never more than 100km between charging points, and therefore a car with >100km range should be OK. However, I didn't realize that most or all of the charging points are only on one side of the autopista, and can't be accessed from the other side. I think in the video he said 180 kilometres is the maximum gap, allowing for this, so you need a car with 200km+ really to drive to Concepcion.

Otherwise it might be possible to drive past the charging point on the other side, look for a retorno, go back, charge, head off in the wrong direction again, look for a retorno again...which is impractical..only works as an emergency backup plan.

At one point in the video he says something about 144 charging points planned by the end of the year, covering from Arica to Punta Arenas. I am not sure where he's getting that from. I'll ask him on facebook and maybe add more info later if he replies.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

Britkid
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Re: electric vehicles in chile

Post by Britkid » Mon Feb 18, 2019 6:06 pm

I asked him for his source on the charging points all over Chile in this year, and he shared this tweet from Ministry of Energy

Energía
‏Verified account @MinEnergia
¡Este año, alcanzaremos las 150 electrolineras a lo largo de todo el país! Sigamos sumando #MásElectromovilidad para Chile
https://twitter.com/MinEnergia/status/1 ... 0236802051
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

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Re: electric vehicles in chile

Post by admin » Tue Feb 19, 2019 9:32 pm

thought this might be relevant to the discussion:

chile's export of lithium surpassed gold in 2018:

https://www.latercera.com/pulso/noticia ... as/534663/
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