Hunting

General topics related to Living in Chile
The wanderer
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Re: Hunting

Post by The wanderer » Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:51 am

Yes i thought of doing exactly that, it'd be useful to hire them to get a rundown.
There is an Outfitter there that helps with getting your own firearm in, i just thought its a bit ridiculous that they let you bring in a firearm but not let you buy one.

Jamers41
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Re: Hunting

Post by Jamers41 » Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:56 pm

The wanderer wrote:
Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:51 am
Yes i thought of doing exactly that, it'd be useful to hire them to get a rundown.
There is an Outfitter there that helps with getting your own firearm in, i just thought its a bit ridiculous that they let you bring in a firearm but not let you buy one.
I have read quite a bit about the topic of firearm legislation here in Chile (not so much about hunting), and while I certainly don't consider myself an expert or anything like that, from what I've read basically everyone will agree that while it's not really simple and requires fun amounts of paperwork, it's far more recommendable to acquire a firearm here versus trying to import one into Chile.

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nwdiver
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Re: Hunting

Post by nwdiver » Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:32 pm

Jamers41 wrote:
Thu Mar 08, 2018 1:56 pm
The wanderer wrote:
Thu Mar 08, 2018 2:51 am
Yes i thought of doing exactly that, it'd be useful to hire them to get a rundown.
There is an Outfitter there that helps with getting your own firearm in, i just thought its a bit ridiculous that they let you bring in a firearm but not let you buy one.
I have read quite a bit about the topic of firearm legislation here in Chile (not so much about hunting), and while I certainly don't consider myself an expert or anything like that, from what I've read basically everyone will agree that while it's not really simple and requires fun amounts of paperwork, it's far more recommendable to acquire a firearm here versus trying to import one into Chile.
After you are a permanent resident, and acquiring from abroad is not too difficult, you just have to follow the rules........having pituto helps also........
It's all about the wine.

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admin
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Re: Hunting

Post by admin » Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:49 pm

Tourist and temp residents can not own or posses fire arms. Whatever you are reading on some guide's web site is a recipe for a trip to jail.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

Jamers41
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
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Re: Hunting

Post by Jamers41 » Fri Mar 09, 2018 5:52 pm

admin wrote:
Thu Mar 08, 2018 7:49 pm
Tourist and temp residents can not own or posses fire arms. Whatever you are reading on some guide's web site is a recipe for a trip to jail.

I'm not sure if this is directed at me or the OP, but in case it wasn't clear, I was not referring to tourists or temporary residents.

The wanderer
Rank: Chile Forum Tourist
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Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:24 am

Re: Hunting

Post by The wanderer » Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:37 pm

Neither was i, i was saying a guide and organise for you to bring one in temporarily while on your trip. Anyways a firearm isn't a big issue for me I'm quite content to use a bow (and strangle ducks) lol. What I'm more concerned about is the amount of wildlife and availability of land to hunt on.

The wanderer
Rank: Chile Forum Tourist
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2018 6:24 am

Re: Hunting

Post by The wanderer » Sun Mar 11, 2018 7:09 am

For anyone else that might want to know:
Under Chilean law, wildlife belongs to the state, but hunting rights on private land remain reserved to their owners. Hunting is allowed only on a person’s own land, or on other’s land with the permission of the owner. Indigenous communities have ownership over ancestral lands where they may use natural resources for their livelihoods and subsistence.

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