Zero Waste in Chile

General topics related to Living in Chile
picalena
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
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Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2012 11:59 pm
Location: la novena

Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by picalena » Fri Dec 29, 2017 4:41 pm

I've done the Villarrica ascent. It is pretty significant, so you do want to be pretty fit to go up. Really fit, actually. I would not at all recommend trying to do it without a guide. There is plenty of danger to be found going it alone. After the eruption, it is also likely that things have changed quite a bit in terms of how and where to ascend.

In mid-December there will be scads of people going up with various operators. It will seem somewhat disorganized, but they do have a system. For the most part, everyone is going up the same way, so you have to keep that in mind. Even if you start with the lift, it is a fair part of the day to summit and get back down again, and you have to wait on other groups and take turns at every point. We did it late November and had to be at the tour operator before daylight, and I think it was easily 5 pm or later when we got back to the van. There were some short rests, but they were driving us pretty hard to get up there.

The most disappointing part is actually at the top. The fumes are quite noxious and dangerous, and there isn't a lot of room. So once you are up there, the operators are trying hard to get the descent going again. Only time for a photo or two, and then putting on your gear for the butt slide down. I can't imagine you would be able to dawdle up there for an eclipse.

As far as bullshit excuses, a few months after we went up, a Mexican hat descended unexpectedly one day in the summer, which is a very dangerous situation. Multiple people died with several different tour operators that day. A number of problems contributed, including, I think, tying people together so that when one went several went, and using cell phones instead of walkie talkies that would have allowed everyone to be on one frequency to share information. In other words, separate groups were unable to communicate conditions to others on the mountain. It was horrible. That is why they are skittish now, and with good reason. A number of operators are very bad, so frankly, I would rather they chicken out than press ahead when they have no clue what they are doing. They also sometimes make bullshit excuses when it is clear that tourists that said they were fit are not going to be able to make the summit in enough time to safely get back down. I have been told that Brazilians are the worst about saying they are in shape and then being obviously incapable.

pl
A woodsman was once asked, “What would you do if you had just five minutes to chop down a tree?” He answered, “I would spend the first two and a half minutes sharpening my axe.” - Dubious source on the internet

scandinavian
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 329
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2010 5:55 pm

Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by scandinavian » Fri Dec 29, 2017 6:14 pm

I did it in summer 2004. We were allowed to ski down after the summit. That was also quite dangerous - several skiers were not very experienced and visibility was very low. I don't think the allow that anymore? And climbing the volcano with skis on the back was pretty exhausting...

Julito
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 180
Joined: Sun Apr 19, 2015 5:39 pm
Location: Villarrica

Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by Julito » Fri Dec 29, 2017 10:42 pm

The Chilean ex military guy I mentioned was instructing the US military in mountaineering so perhaps he's polishing some of the guide skills in that department too.

Britkid
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
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Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:59 pm
Location: Talagante area, Chile
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Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by Britkid » Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:06 pm

Interesting comments about the volcano, I didn't see those last comments in December. I've had my fair share over the years of arguing with guides (not in Chile) when I want to go to the summit and they usually want to go back.

Anyway, I came back to this old thread to reply to the point about the plastic bags.Thanks Space Cat for telling me about the Jumbo bags manufactured by Basulip - (see photo on page 2). Which I went and bought at the weekend (I don't go out to Jumbo very often). I am also pleased that there are 50x70 sizes as well because that is what I need for the smaller bathroom bags.

According to Basulip (email to me): "Las Biobolsas Basulip son Biocompostables, elaboradas en base a Almidón de Maíz. Para lograr que se degraden sin dejar residuos tóxicos, el producto debe estar en contacto con el medio ambiente (sol, lluvia, humedad, viento, tierra)." Almidón de Maíz is corn starch according to google. That sounds pretty good. Better than the bioplastics that are another type of synthetic plastic that just breaks up into smaller pieces of plastic.

According to the text on the bag, the products will decompose in 6 months, although when I called Basulip they said that this factors in time spent at the store and in the home, I think they idea is for 6 months after it hits the landfill having already been through some wear and tear. Anyway, I cut some pieces of the bag and left them in various locations to see what happens to them (if anything). If a landfill is sealed up however, nothing really biodegrades for a lot longer.

The bags cost about 2600 or 2700 for 10 or 11, which is expensive compared to 1600 or 1700 for the same amount of regular bags in Jumbo which can be had at nearer 1000 in other places.

The bags are also transparent, so I don't know how people feel about being able to see all the rubbish when you carry it to the bin and leave it in the outside bin.

However the good thing about the transparency of the bags is that I will be able to take them to the supermarket and use them for the bread, fruit etc.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

Britkid
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
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Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:59 pm
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Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by Britkid » Thu Mar 08, 2018 12:24 pm

Found this old thread from 2008 about recycling in Chile:
viewtopic.php?f=38&t=1484
Very interesting to see how much things changed in 10 years. Also, some of the posts of 2008 were quite wise, almost prophetic, in their expectations of what would happen in the future.

I saw in Sodimac a poster and it said no plastic bags will be given by them througout Chile from the 1st April.

The Zero Waste Chile facebook group is pretty active at the moment by the way.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

AnciaVagar
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
Posts: 118
Joined: Mon Sep 05, 2016 4:52 pm

Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by AnciaVagar » Thu Mar 08, 2018 5:48 pm

Recycling costs energy which produces pollution and is expensive in Chile. How does one balance waste versus emissions and expense?

Britkid
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
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Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 6:59 pm
Location: Talagante area, Chile
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Re: Zero Waste in Chile

Post by Britkid » Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:56 pm

Well environmentally speaking the best is not to buy something in the first place, failing that at least re-use, failing that at least recycling is better than landfill. Recycling something is better than landfill because although it does use a fair amount of energy and resource I think it's usually less than producing a new product.

But a zero waste lifestyle is better than recycling. People living a true zero waste life style have hardly any rubbish/trash at all, even recycling. That's ultimately the direction that I'm going to head in eventually perhaps.
In 2014/2015 I blogged about my life in Chile. http://web.archive.org/web/201601121940 ... age_id=268

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