graffitti in Chile

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graffitti in Chile

Post by admin » Thu Sep 07, 2006 10:38 pm

This was so good, I had to place it in the thorn tree.

chinook wrote:
I have never been comfortable in larger cities, and really don't care for them, but I have to admit that Concepcion was pretty fair (and I don't speak the language as well as I'd like - more on that later). The only thing that bummed me out in Concepcion was the propensity for graffitti ... my guess is that with the change in the political climate, folks aren't worried about "disappearing" for acts of civil disobedience, or just plain speaking their minds. Yes, the country is quite safe (I took long walks in Concepcion late at night, by myself,
My response:
What I have seen across Latin america is that cost of spray paint relative to the local income. Chile is a rich country in the Americas, thus kids can afford paint. If you go to more rural areas, small towns and such, the amount of urban art goes down.
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chinook
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Post by chinook » Fri Sep 08, 2006 2:11 am

Hey Admin (and anyone else who might pipe in on this topic) - I really don't mean to "pick" on Chile about the graffitti. Like I said, I really enjoyed my visit - even while in Concepcion, and I don't do well in larger cities. There was certainly graffitti, but in good truth probably not larger volumes than a person might find in any large city, anywhere in the world. What struck me was that most of the graffitti that caught my eye was often on park statues and monuments. A little distracting.

And I have to agree that outside of larger population centers (like Concepcion), in smaller towns the presence of graffitti tended to disappear - folks tend to have particular good pride in their local communities. Coyhaique was a gem! As was Puerto Aisen.

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kind of understand

Post by admin » Sat Sep 09, 2006 5:59 am

Sorry about moving that post. On the flip side, that Chile's problems are in such a state that this relatively minor issue is what came to mind should be taken as a good sign.

I think a good deal of it has to do with the taggers are just so dam fast that people have kind of given up trying to remove it or cover it up.

There also something to be said for small town crime. If you do something wrong, it will beat you home to mom. You still see it in the small towns, just not plastered everywhere.

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Post by MikieO » Mon May 28, 2007 2:15 pm

Hi all, I was just reading the Valparaiso Times (hope it's OK to post address here) and on the one hand was surprised to see that graffiti is SO prevalent yet not surprised to see it arrived with hip hop. IMO, taggers should have a bounty on their heads, here in Ca we've had our garage door tagged twice. As for gay freedom, they have quite enough already (again IMO).
http://www.valparaisotimes.cl/content/view/96/1/

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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by MikieO » Mon May 25, 2009 2:20 am

I've been looking at these devices as a way to combat graffiti at the beach
http://www.themosquitodevice.com/5.html
then I started thinking that this is actually a business opportunity. The cost is pretty steep (for Chile) but so is having the stonework sand blasted. It'll also shift skateboarders, a win win! :mrgreen:
A little hand wringing here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfuMEGMersE
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mardy
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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by mardy » Mon May 25, 2009 10:08 am

Like most I hate tag type and ugly graffitti, but I must say I have also seen some FANTASTIC artwork done on walls..even in Villarrica. There are a number of walls where the owners have commissioned graffitti artists to decorate their otherwise drab grey wall and WOW! Unfortunately you get the good with the bad and the bad is ugly. Throughout our drive holiday of Chile my son often commented on some of the amazingly decorative graffiti and I have to admit some of it was quite amazing. In Australia they have actually also starting encorouging graffiti artists to decorate buildings rather than mess them up...it allows them to display their artistic ability in a controlled manner and has helped reduce dramatically the truly ugly stuff.

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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by admin » Mon May 25, 2009 12:35 pm

yea, sometimes the original wall was uglier than even the ugliest graffiti.
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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by Vicki and Greg Lansen » Mon May 25, 2009 12:48 pm

Still though...I hate seeing gobs of graffiti on walls, and on buildings. And I was thinking that capitalizing on it is bull. Defacing public and private property is not acceptable. To see this stuff, while some is interesting, bothers me, in that you just shouldn't be scratching and painting up someone elses property and there it is right in your face. Then, I got to thinking, it's really no different than all the ugly, in your face billboards and ads...except someone, or some corporation had the advertising money to put the stuff up. Just defacement in exchange for money. But if I owned one of these homes I see spray-painted, I would be completely pissed. I know Charles mentioned that the amount of graffiti is relevant to the disposable income, and he might be absolutely right, but respect for other peoples property and creative outlets and education might be another factor. Why should one person who has paid their dues in the art world have to struggle to get his or her art shown, while others flaunt laws and socially acceptable norms to plaster their art all over other people's property? Someone spray painting on another person's vehicle would be an outrage. Why is spray painting on someone's real property not the same? Is this an "If you can't beat them - join them" solution?

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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by mardy » Mon May 25, 2009 1:11 pm

I agree with your point, but do beleive if both parties are in agreeance with the application then why should we complain. Graffiti is sometimes used in error when infact it is actual wall art that can have a cosmetic improvement. I too would be well pissed if someone painted on my wall without my permission, but on the other hand I would be more than happy to recruit an artist to paint a talented mural on my wall for all to enjoy.

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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by MikieO » Mon May 25, 2009 2:00 pm

I had new gates built for the house this year, I guess the new white paint was too tempting and they got tagged by some scumbag with a spraycan. I've just paid a lot of money to have persianas (roll up shutters) installed to protect the windows and have no reason to believe that they will be treated with any additional respect. In asking the manufacturer about graffiti prevention/removal, they have no answers as the paint has a good bonding agent to the powder coating.
I had the idea to coat the outside surface with synthetic motor oil to deny the raw surface to the taggers and we have done this. A neighbour 3 doors away has a persiana that was tagged, permanently. I'd post the pic but don't know how.
In any event, I didn't know that in addition to the difficulties of finding good construction help here I'd be trying to outfox vandals. I'm thinking that the mosquito device along with a motion sensor will probably be the best investment I can make until I'm in Chile full time and get a dog.
And as for the "art" aspect, if it's been requested, fine but otherwise it's vandalism and should carry a mandatory 6 months on a cleanup crew and a big fine. We'll see how much disposable income they want to use on spray paint after that. :mrgreen:
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Chuck J 3.0
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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by Chuck J 3.0 » Mon May 25, 2009 2:10 pm

Need a few heads on pikes, metaphorically speaking. Examples made of a few miscreants, wide coverage of their embarrassing punishments on TV, etc. Part of the answer would be parents or guardians having to pay the city for clean up for their 'artist' children. Garnish a few of Pop's paychecks and see how juniors life becomes a living hell at home. Mom and Pop can't afford it? OK, first offense Junior spends 10 hours a day the next 30 days cleaning up graffiti around the city as part of a crew in orange jumpsuits supervised by cops. Progressively more harsh punishments for repeat offenders, that will quickly separate out the bored kids from the hardcore graffiti idiot types. The bored kids will at some point get a clue and stop. The hard core will get an early intro to the penal system.

Also need a special detail to combat it. I think all new cops fresh out of cop school should spend six months or a year working anti-graffiti as a first assignment. I know that right now there is probably little to zero actual anti-graffiti programs going on. Just a matter of making it a higher priority, having to will to do it and applying pressure where its needed. It's a quality of life issue. But if it doesn't bother people enough to do anything about it......

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Re: graffitti in Chile

Post by Laura55llc » Mon May 25, 2009 3:44 pm

MikieO and Chuck are calling for...more regulation? :D
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