Rain harvesting system

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Joanne
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Rain harvesting system

Post by Joanne » Wed May 01, 2013 12:48 am

Hello,

I am seriously considering having a rain harvesting system built, preferably underground to accumulate water from the washing machine, basins and shower and then reuse it in the garden. The house has already been built so this might be more of a mission than doing it from scratch.

Or if we have to dig up half the house I would opt for a tank system attached to the gutters of my roof to accumulate rain water. Has anyone else in Chile looked into this? Or spoke to a company that could do it? I can't find any companies online offering their services within Chile. Outside of Chile of course I am spoilt for choice.

Insight??

thisisreallycomplicated
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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by thisisreallycomplicated » Wed May 01, 2013 1:09 am

Joanne wrote:Insight??
This sounds a lot like plumbing. In Chile. Have you considered doing it yourself? If you hire someone, I'd be really careful that it gets done right the first time. Especially if it's going to be buried under your house.
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nwdiver
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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by nwdiver » Wed May 01, 2013 1:24 am

If your graywater is separated from your blackwater to somewhere in the house, you then plumb the kitchen sink and dishwasher to the black water and run the graywater through a filter into a storage tank. You can then use for irrigation or run it back into the toilets and out the blackwater system. A pair of 30 gal sand filters works best for filtering. You could also run rain into it but that involves gutters off the roof and I have never seen gutters for the roof in the Central Valley ;)
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ExpatBob
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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by ExpatBob » Wed May 01, 2013 4:51 am

I'd say just hire the folks who do septic tanks to put in a solid tank without leech field.

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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by Vicki and Greg Lansen » Wed May 01, 2013 9:23 am

I had no need for a rain-harvesting or gray water reclamation project when we built our place in Patagonia. Water everywhere, most of the time. However, my Pop, who lives in Colorado found himself in a progressively water starved area with severe rationing of water. He was able to, fairly easily, reroute sink, washing machinge and bathwater to a containment tank. He also collected from rain spouts which I realize are not standard in some places in Chile. I am now in Panama where gutters are not usual, but we MADE our own using large PVC pipes with a cut-through length wise at a slight angle and slipped onto the corregated roofing material.

A good place to start researching is: http://greywateraction.org/greywater-recycling

Good luck!

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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by admin » Wed May 01, 2013 12:28 pm

I am doing a separate grey water / black water systems not to save water (in the south, lot's of water around), but to reduce the load on the black water septic system. One of the big problems with septic systems are people dumping things like bleaches and other antibacterial soaps in to the system, essentially killing off the bacteria. Full septic systems are more expensive to build, install, and maintain. Most of the water going in to traditional black water system is water that does not need to be (as) treated. I am also adding a double septic tank on the black water system to both increase efficiency of the system, but add reduancy to the system. Fixing a septic system is something I don't ever want to have to do.

I have a reserve backup water tank, and also will have a second tank that will collect rainwater. The idea is to have a few sources of water available, if the water from the community is out (depends on an electric powered pump that runs a couple times a day, and we have all seen the electricity go away after the earthquake for more than a day). I don't really plan to use it for house water, except in an emergency (there are some health and building permit issues that would create, so leaving it as an undocumented backup system for irrigation).

metal and plastic rain gutters can be bought at sodimac.

I was at a friends farm. The owner had dug a very large pond on the farm to collect rain water. The reason was simple. In the event of a fire, the fire department would not be able to get sufficient water to the house in a rural area. I have seen it happen first hand, just across the street from the lake. So, as I was trying to figure out what to do with drains from the roof and foundation, I realized I have a nice low spot in the yard for a pond that could also serve that function (also a fourth source of water in an emergency, and the rain water storage tank can be used during the few weeks in the summer when there is no rain to keep it full). So, that is where the water is going to be collected.
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hlf2888
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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by hlf2888 » Wed May 01, 2013 12:57 pm

in building our house, I asked the contractor to seperate the pipes from kitchen and bathroom from toilet. He did it, called it agua servido. Guess others have done this. So the aqua servido goes to the garden area and I can direct it to whichever tree or planting area needs it the most. I change the hose daily to water another part. Just ask for instalacion de tubos para agua servido for those who are working with a maestro. .

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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by Vicki and Greg Lansen » Wed May 01, 2013 1:23 pm

hlf2888 wrote:in building our house, I asked the contractor to seperate the pipes from kitchen and bathroom from toilet. He did it, called it agua servido. Guess others have done this. So the aqua servido goes to the garden area and I can direct it to whichever tree or planting area needs it the most. I change the hose daily to water another part. Just ask for instalacion de tubos para agua servido for those who are working with a maestro. .
Good advice for someone building from scratch. Good for you!

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Re: Rain harvesting system

Post by Putenio » Wed May 01, 2013 3:41 pm

We built a rain recovery barn - aluminum roof, gutters from Sodimac modified to fit big filter system we brought in from the US, and pipe it (4" pipes, 110) to 2 10k liter tanks on 6' concrete pads in an enclosed area with a 1.75 pump on an automatic to a 1200L tank atop a 9m steel tower. We searched for local products and only had to source the filter system (volume capacity & filtration - sometimes it rains buckets here). We use it for everything and the independence it provides from the local system is worth it. It's the primary system for the main living spaces here. 20K liters insures a dry February is not a big deal, though we still have to pay attention to water consumption. We just picked up a book on rain recovery, probably off of Amazon.com, and took it step by step.
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