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Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 8:52 am
by tiagoabner
admin wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:47 am

no shit sherlock, you do a massive amnesty, handing out temporary residency, then guess what? after a year or so, all of them are eligible for permanent residency; and, they all come due at about the same time.

They don't understand that temporary residency is required to qualify for permanent residency.
There are currently time schedule websites for all steps of the process due to how packed immigration agencies are.

As an anecdote, I applied for my temporary residency visa on May and it was approved in November, almost exactly 6 months after the application date.

Then I needed to get a time to stamp the Visa on my passport. There are no times available and I was put on a wait list, and I ended up waiting 3 weeks to be able to stamp my passport.

That's not the end of the saga, though. I've requested a time to register my visa with PDI, and they also didn't have times available. It has been almost a month, and they still haven't assigned me a time. Hopefully they'll do it soon.

Even then, I won't be done, as I'll need to get my ID card. Come to think about it, this could all be done at a one-stop shop, where the immigrant did all of this shit at once. It's not like if any of these steps were optional anyway. But that's me thinking from an efficiency point of view.

I wonder if Chile started to offer expedited visa processing for a premium fee, and then used these resources to update their immigration infrastructure. Say, USD 1000 for a 2-weeks processing time and USD 5000 for 3-days processing time. They should be able to get at least USD 1 million per year, and probably much more. An efficient management team can use those funds to greatly improved their systems... But oh, this is Chile. Nevermind, then.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:02 am
by admin
tiagoabner wrote:
Sat Dec 21, 2019 8:52 am
admin wrote:
Fri Oct 18, 2019 9:47 am

no shit sherlock, you do a massive amnesty, handing out temporary residency, then guess what? after a year or so, all of them are eligible for permanent residency; and, they all come due at about the same time.

They don't understand that temporary residency is required to qualify for permanent residency.
There are currently time schedule websites for all steps of the process due to how packed immigration agencies are.

As an anecdote, I applied for my temporary residency visa on May and it was approved in November, almost exactly 6 months after the application date.

Then I needed to get a time to stamp the Visa on my passport. There are no times available and I was put on a wait list, and I ended up waiting 3 weeks to be able to stamp my passport.

That's not the end of the saga, though. I've requested a time to register my visa with PDI, and they also didn't have times available. It has been almost a month, and they still haven't assigned me a time. Hopefully they'll do it soon.

Even then, I won't be done, as I'll need to get my ID card. Come to think about it, this could all be done at a one-stop shop, where the immigrant did all of this shit at once. It's not like if any of these steps were optional anyway. But that's me thinking from an efficiency point of view.

I wonder if Chile started to offer expedited visa processing for a premium fee, and then used these resources to update their immigration infrastructure. Say, USD 1000 for a 2-weeks processing time and USD 5000 for 3-days processing time. They should be able to get at least USD 1 million per year, and probably much more. An efficient management team can use those funds to greatly improved their systems... But oh, this is Chile. Nevermind, then.
That is probably a pretty good idea. It could filter out also the poor economic refugees.

just crank up the fees and crank up.the fines. you want to stay in the country illegally, well there is a fine for that too, multiply by 10x for each breach.

like Europe does it. Can not recall exactly, but believe I paid like 1,000 euros for my student visa to the dutch government.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:04 am
by admin
they could probably at least bring the flood of fake work contracts to halt. got a real company that needs a real employee, pay up.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 11:25 am
by admin
The venezuelans are still trying to get in to chile via bolivia.

https://www.biobiochile.cl/noticias/int ... anso.shtml

so this wanker is in complete poverty, but hey why not have two more kids in peru in an attempt to get residency; if that does not work, go over to bolivia to beg on the street.

definitely not the rocket scientist chile is looking for.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 11:51 am
by mem
I second the motion to allow increased fees for expedited Visa service. So many times...so many times I wish I could have just plopped down a million or 2 pesos to get things moving at intendencia.

Good on you tiago for saying what we are all pining away for

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 1:28 pm
by Donnybrook
On a too brief visit a couple of years ago, son needed to do PDI/Registro Civil renewal of cedula. Over Christmas and New Year too It was before appointments for PDI (although that doesn't seem to be working much better than queueing at 3 am).Made an appointment for Registro Civil, which was working well and got someone to do the PDI for him. Cost $100. Best money ever spent. Btw, they are no longer doing it since the appointments came in. So I think a lot of people would pay for fast track and it doesn't have to cost a fortune and would unclog the system.

I think the US green card application is around US$400 and that lasts a year. If it isn't done in the time, another payment the same.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 2:17 pm
by tiagoabner
mem wrote:
Sat Dec 21, 2019 11:51 am
I second the motion to allow increased fees for expedited Visa service. So many times...so many times I wish I could have just plopped down a million or 2 pesos to get things moving at intendencia.

Good on you tiago for saying what we are all pining away for
Yeah, and I believe it may actually be cheaper to pay the fee for most well paid professionals.

IE: imagine a doctor coming from, say, Argentina to work on Chile. It might be cheaper to pay USD $5000 to have it all sorted out in a few days then to wait months without being able to work.

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:18 am
by admin
interesting bloomberg article on migration flows and chile, in light of the social unrest.

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/arti ... ing-crises

Re: chile's migration crisis

Posted: Mon Dec 30, 2019 3:03 pm
by 41southchile
admin wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 9:18 am
interesting bloomberg article on migration flows and chile, in light of the social unrest.

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/arti ... ing-crises
Interesting article, "Damage here worse than Venezuela" the Venezuelan woman said, "but here you can turn on a light and it works, water comes out of the tap still", it kind of sums it up really , and Chileans displaying their true colours in the last few months.
Its like the comments from the Argentinans early on in the unrest, "no matter what we think of our politicians or system we will protest for sure, but we wont burn down our country or loot from our neighbors " (or words to that effect) . I guess Chile is different from its neighbors after all.