chile's migration crisis

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hlf2888
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by hlf2888 » Fri Aug 25, 2017 12:40 am

eeuunikkeiexpat wrote:Fluoride in the tap? Cell towers and the fanatical reliance on CIA sponsored/investments/ownership of Facebook/Twit/YouTube/WhatsApp/etc.? The growth in reliance on processed foodstuffs?
I totally agree that the masses are being manipulated everywhere, probably in most countries. And the methods that you mention make exquisite sense. It seems that most of the independent thinkers are on well water and far from cell towers and processed foodstuffs. Don't forget the ubiquitous chemtrails. They are the most difficult to avoid.

passport
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by passport » Fri Aug 25, 2017 12:46 am

Any sign of Pinera - buddy boy David Rockefeller - Soros triangle?

Julito
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by Julito » Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:21 am

An interesting thread. Putting the politics aside, there are some positives. Haitians are becoming more and more visible down South and the impression I'm getting is they're hard workers and grateful for the opportunity to work. We were in a Temuco seafood distribution outlet late last year and apart from the owner and the foreman all the employees were Haitian. Why? For the above reasons, plus they don't steal and they come to work every day as expected.

A large supermarket in Villarrica has recently employed 8 of them and they're not extras, they've replaced Chilean workers. So there seems to be a growing awareness among employers that Haitians are harder workers, and possibly less likely to go on strike when productivity issues arise.

I watched one on a shovel the other day and he was right into it, working fast to get the job done.

And this morning I saw one pushing a wheelbarrow, quickly, enthusiastically. As to their skills, perhaps there're some decent tradesmen amongst them. And they're not all uneducated. I know of one around here with a computor science degree.

A month or so ago I was at a party where there was a young couple with their baby daughter, he Haitian with passable English and good Spanish, his wife attractive, upper middle class, university educated and excellent English. So it seems the young Haitian blokes are starting to pull the Chilean birds too :)

frozen-north
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by frozen-north » Fri Aug 25, 2017 1:07 pm

Julito wrote:
Haitians .... the impression I'm getting is they're hard workers and grateful for the opportunity to work.

I watched one on a shovel the other day and he was right into it, working fast to get the job done.

And this morning I saw one pushing a wheelbarrow, quickly, enthusiastically.
May be they haven't seen their first paycheck yet. :)

HybridAmbassador
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by HybridAmbassador » Fri Aug 25, 2017 2:54 pm

frozen-north wrote:
Julito wrote:
Haitians .... the impression I'm getting is they're hard workers and grateful for the opportunity to work.

I watched one on a shovel the other day and he was right into it, working fast to get the job done.

And this morning I saw one pushing a wheelbarrow, quickly, enthusiastically.
May be they haven't seen their first paycheck yet. :)
Ha,ha,haa, then when the Haitianos see the pile of Chilean Pesos, they could be dancing in joy or, amazed to see the "pocos pesos" in their hands..! Either way, much,much better than life in Port Au Prince...
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Gloria
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by Gloria » Fri Aug 25, 2017 3:43 pm

frozen-north wrote:
Julito wrote:
Haitians .... the impression I'm getting is they're hard workers and grateful for the opportunity to work.

I watched one on a shovel the other day and he was right into it, working fast to get the job done.

And this morning I saw one pushing a wheelbarrow, quickly, enthusiastically.
May be they haven't seen their first paycheck yet. :)
:lol: :lol:
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tiagoabner
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by tiagoabner » Fri Aug 25, 2017 6:39 pm

Haiti's yearly annual income averages at $350, with an average of $409 when considering only urban areas. Data is a bit outdated (Source: http://www.haitioutreach.org/wp-content ... istory.pdf), but is consistent with the World Bank data found here: http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/haiti/overview

Living in Chile can be expensive, but if you live in an "immigrant warehouse" or ultra-budget shared place, they can make a living and still have money left to send back home. Just for the sake of comparison, let's assume the $409 figure is correct. That means a monthly wage of roughly $34, or 8% of a Chilean minimum wage. It's certainly not comfortable and they will not have a great time, but it's still probably much better than back home.

There is a lot of financial sense in working here, sending some money back home to help their families make ends meet and then get their manman, papa and timouns to Chile. Haiti is still for the most part a devastated country, there's nothing holding them back. Once the whole family is here, they can share a house far from downtown, but still within public transportation range. With 2 people working in a household and doing extra hours and/or side jobs, they can easily make a very decent living, even for those that have no skills, or much more for those that do have them. They're not going to get rich, but they're going to have a decent life.

What reason would they have to go back to this?

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Julito
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by Julito » Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:22 pm

Exactly, I'm from one of the most multicultural countries in the world where half the population was either born overseas or their parents were, Australia. All my life I've witnessed the growth and diversity immigrants have contributed to the development of the country through their willingness to work their arses off to get ahead. And if in their willingness to work they blitz the locals, too bad.

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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by Julito » Fri Aug 25, 2017 11:55 pm

....and Australia's first huge influx of immigrants was post WW2. They'd lost everything, were as poor as church mice, had bugger all English, lived anywhere they could afford and started working, hard. So they were no different to the Haitians arriving here today, economic immigrants willing to work.

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by eeuunikkeiexpat » Sat Aug 26, 2017 1:34 am

Except developing (still Latin) Chile is not rich/richer (Anglo) Australia and can't even come through for their own "lazy" population.

Again, everything based on "at the restaurant or store as a client" visit or I talked to and saw "xxxx" as an outsider with means and not the reality of where most are ending up and the perceptions of the locals and what that will mean for the expats (also "extranjeros") already established here.

Really, I hope you are correct (as I am already invested here with a lot of time but thankfully not with real estate yet TG), but Chile was not a black country 16 years ago and now it will be and that kind of change might be too much for this previously homogenous country to deal with if things go downhill for the economy.
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Julito
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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by Julito » Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:32 am

Developed countries weren't always rich and they didn't become developed by accident. Chile's ongoing struggle to develop even after 400 years of European settlement can only be slated to one thing, culture. Which suggests it was settled by the wrong combination of European tribes. With a similar population and a much longer history of settlement it should by now be more developed than New Zealand.

A few hundred thousand in a population of 18 million is a drop in the bucket. All countries developed or not have economic downturns, it's cyclicle. And if the "lazy" lose out to the motivated, that's what happens everywhere.

Tell us where "most are ending up". Is it actually most, or just some? It's early days yet but what I'm seeing around Villarrica is only positive.

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Re: chile's migration crisis

Post by bobserb » Sat Aug 26, 2017 10:49 am

Julito wrote:....and Australia's first huge influx of immigrants was post WW2. They'd lost everything, were as poor as church mice, had bugger all English, lived anywhere they could afford and started working, hard. So they were no different to the Haitians arriving here today, economic immigrants willing to work.
You can't equally regard every immigrant group .Have you ever heard of criminal immigrant gangs of German,Swiss,Swedish origin in US or Australia?But there are dangerous Haitian criminal gangs in US,despite they are plenty of jobs.Pattern likely to be repeated in other countries.Look at this interesting conversation and video"-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqdObNwHyFI
''
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Originally Posted by 9TheCityOfAngeles9 View Post
yes Haitian's are cut throat especially down there in Florida . i know a few haitians around here they are just like americans then i know 1 or 2 that you can tell their from Haiti . But i heard Zoe Pound is crazy down there in FLA . Are they the ones running the show down there ?
Sort of, it's basically alot of different haitian and american gangs down there. Zoe Pound is probably the most notorious of the haitian gangs, but I dont know if there running the show. In certain parts of Miami, Zoe Poun has control over, but diffirent areas have different gangs, battling it out. But there are MANY, MANY, MANY, different Haitian gangs in south florida other then zoe pound, some of them are affiliated with zoe pound, most others are just there own sets. There is Haitian Zulus, Zombie Boyz, SAP, Btown Boyz, Top 6, San Castle Boyz, Ace Clique, Monroe Heights boyz, Tru Haitian Boyz, E unit, 22ave boys, John Does, Vondas, Cloud9, Boobie Boyz, those are some of the gangs in south florida.
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