Can you afford to live in Chile????

Chile Investment, how to invest in Chile, what to watch out for when investing, economic issues, currency exchange in Chile, and more.
frozen-north
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby frozen-north » Wed Jul 26, 2017 10:30 pm

Britkid wrote:
In my experience, Chileans don't seem to like just having money sitting in the bank. It seems like a waste to them. People in the lower classes will spend all their money month to month,


There could be different reasons for different people. For some there might be so little money left after expenses that it makes no difference whether they save it or not. On the other side you have people of every income level that just spend everything they earn.

It was explained to me that the people would travel with only the absolute minimum money needed on them, and wouldn't have money for even a cheap hotel. Keep in mind you could get hotel rooms for $2/ night which is way less than the train fare, and still you've get people sleeping in the train station overnight with their kids.



Any idea of what type of income these families had? May be they would rather keep those $2 for food?

bobserb
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby bobserb » Thu Jul 27, 2017 11:36 am

Yesterday prices at ''feria libre''- bananas,apples,kiwi,oranges - US $ -0.40 a pound.Avocado-$ 0.80 ,potato-$ 0.15,tomato $ 0.50,onion $ 0.20....If you shop in JUMBO, multiply by 3.

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tiagoabner
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby tiagoabner » Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:12 pm

I have moved to Chile with my wife last December and I have shared some thoughts at another thread, so I will drop my 2 cents here.

$50000 in savings looks like a very fair and reasonable value for anyone who comes to Chile without a job. It will let you get a decent living for $2000 per month with enough money to get back home if needed.

In my specific case, I didn't come with anything close to that sum, but I already had a contract for a remote position in an American company. As such, we already had a stable source of income. We set a monthly budget of $2000 per month to allow for us to save money and to enjoy the country while we are here and our monthly expenses came up to be around $1350 to $1500 per month. So we spent less than what we expected and that allowed for us to do some small trips here and there. We could certainly live with $1500 per month, or even less if we lived in the middle of nowhere, but we didn't want to lower our standards.

Budgeting for a move abroad is a matter of how you want to live, how much you want to pay and how much money you have available.

There are multiple living standards in every city. Haitians living in warehouses that have been split into improvised bedrooms will have a very low living standard, but it is also very cheap. Then there is the remote apartment that, while still being nice, is a bit too far to be really practical unless you don't need to work. There's then the middle-class buildings, then Las Condes flats and finally large Lo Barnechea houses.

Every option has a different price, so it is up to you to budget for the living standards you want to have and then sticking to the budget. Financial planning isn't something most schools teach, so most people don't know what to do with their money and that is what causes confusion about how to budget.

I think it has been mentioned here previously, but the real way to measure your financial health is based on your spare money. What is your desired living standard? How much it costs in cities A, B and C in countries X, Y and Z where you want to live? How much are you going to earn in each one of these places? The amount you have left every month is the way to measure how healthy you are financially, assuming you compare the same living standards.

This seems to be really basic, but most people simply overlook this while budgeting and that seems to be what causes frustration all around. Yes, you can get the same living standards in Santiago for way less than in, let's say, New York or Perth. However, your spare money will probably be much less if you don't get a job that requires skilled work or if you don't have a source of income disconnected from the Chilean work market.

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admin
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby admin » Thu Jul 27, 2017 10:45 pm

Nice coverage.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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hlf2888
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby hlf2888 » Fri Jul 28, 2017 10:19 pm

admin wrote:When i have time, i might come back and tell the long story of how i was a complete failure in my first pass at chile (mas o menos), under the above criteria, and then some, considering i had all exta resouces and support most foreigners will never have.

I check everyday for this story, hope you have time soon...

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eeuunikkeiexpat
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby eeuunikkeiexpat » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:33 pm

hlf2888 wrote:
admin wrote:When i have time, i might come back and tell the long story of how i was a complete failure in my first pass at chile (mas o menos), under the above criteria, and then some, considering i had all exta resouces and support most foreigners will never have.

I check everyday for this story, hope you have time soon...

This would indeed be a story worth telling as in my experience of 16 years, those who failed in Chile and vowed to return, never came through with the vow.
Generally, just a SPAM KILLER. You are on your own in this forum. My personal mission here is done.

BUT when necessary, by way of ridicule and truth revelation we shalt do war.

--eeuunikkeiexpat

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tiagoabner
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby tiagoabner » Sun Jul 30, 2017 11:51 pm

I'm also curious about Admin's story.

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admin
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby admin » Mon Jul 31, 2017 10:51 am

Well, fail is not exactly the right term. More like I never came to Chile with the intention of succeeding. I was leaving ASAP. I came to visit my brother. Did not really see anything here for me; I was quickly bored with Chile. My problem was, after spending several years in Central America and Mexico, I just did not see any opportunities or a whole lot of adventure.

In real developing countries, everything is broken or just never existed. So they are flush with opportunities. As an old partner in central america use to say, "in latin america you don't need a new idea, you just need a good idea". Yea, there are opportunities in Chile, but you have to put in a relatively large investment in time and money to make them work vs the neighboring countries. I simply was not interested in working that hard at it, when I knew that somewhere in south america there was a pile of opportunities.

Then I met my wife. We decided we were going to leave Chile, go to school in Europe. She insisted however before I judge Chile, I needed to see the south. In the south of Chile I seen opportunity. Santiago had nice shiny everything, but the south was just getting going. Still, we went to Europe for year. China for year. At about that point, I realized I was tired of traveling. I had been bouncing around for nearly 12+ years, none-stop.

It was after China I sort of come to appreciate Chile. I realized the opportunity that Chile presents, is stability. Once you build something, you generally get to keep it. In the rest of latin America, and much of the World, there is about a 10-20% chance you get to keep what you build, before someone comes along and takes it away (e.g. mafia, corruption, copycats, governments, etc).

At that point, we were ready to invest the time to make Chile work. So we came back to Chile, and went south. It was not easy by any stretch, but it worked out. I think we came back from China with like $1000, and burned through that very quickly. Everything else we had to figure out along the way. Yea, we had family, but they were of pretty limited help, and honestly we did not want them involved in our projects. Probably one of the better moves was keeping the family at arms reach. Chilean families will to want to be very helpful, but in a too many cooks in the kitchen sort of way. Most friends and family thought we were crazy, and should just go get a nice stable job in Santiago. We would probably still be dying a little bit every day, "at that nice stable job in Santiago" and have never gotten anywhere with it.
Spencer Global Chile: Legal, relocation, and Investment assistance in Chile.
For more information visit: https://www.spencerglobal.com

From USA and outside Chile dial 1-917-727-5985 (U.S.), in Chile dial 65 2 42 1024 or by cell 747 97974.

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hlf2888
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Re: Can you afford to live in Chile????

Postby hlf2888 » Mon Jul 31, 2017 11:10 pm

thanks admin... love changes everything


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