Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby JHyre » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:38 pm

Oh some of us did indeed give and now find it best to pursue our inalienable rights and preserve our wealth away from a certain geographical locale.

The storm cannot be avoided like it could have 10 years ago so now the best some of us can do is preserve what we have and contribute to rebuilding after the dust settles.


I hear you without being quite to that point, just yet. Of course, tomorrow may be different, and today I could be wrong.

Problem with waiting for dust to settle....that can take a long, long time. I'm presently thinking of lapse between say, fall of Rome and the Renaissance. That sort of waiting period would thoroughly cornhole one's schedule.

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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby regioncentralX » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:42 pm

JHyre wrote:
Oh some of us did indeed give and now find it best to pursue our inalienable rights and preserve our wealth away from a certain geographical locale.

The storm cannot be avoided like it could have 10 years ago so now the best some of us can do is preserve what we have and contribute to rebuilding after the dust settles.


I hear you without being quite to that point, just yet. Of course, tomorrow may be different, and today I could be wrong.

Problem with waiting for dust to settle....that can take a long, long time. I'm presently thinking of lapse between say, fall of Rome and the Renaissance. That sort of waiting period would thoroughly cornhole one's schedule.

John Hyre

True, thus the spirit of pursuing of Happiness at the most basic level and perpetuating the concept as rebuilding day may never come in our lifetime. In the grand scheme of human history, it would not be the first Dark Age or probably the last one.
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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby JHyre » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:44 pm

And then when I move somewhere else, I'll do the same.


I think others could be forgiven for interpreting such sentiments as opportunistic, and lacking a certain conviction. It seems to portray the "give" side as unserious and lacking in oomph, with much more interest in "getting", whilst others do the heavy lifting, and bailing out when it appears others may not be willing to carry their (and perhaps your) weight.

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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby carica » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:47 pm

Really JHyre? I have some cynical with a side of cynical to sell; I know you're buying!

No, it just means that I'm in a career where I move sometimes, and look to maintain the same social (moral) agreement in each place. Welcome to the globalized world.
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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby JHyre » Tue Apr 10, 2012 3:47 pm

True, thus the spirit of pursuing of Happiness at the most basic level and perpetuating the concept as rebuilding day may never come in our lifetime. In the grand scheme of human history, it would not be the first Dark Age or probably the last one.


A very Latin sentiment - going native? :) But also why Latins achieve less in the way of building, and suffer more self-inflicted Dark Ages. I'll take the old-fashioned stiff upper lip Lockean approach, with a dash of Latin thrown in to actually enjoy the fruit of one's labor.

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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby john » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:18 pm

I think moral ambiguity may arise if one's extended family and close friends are left behind to 'face the music'. While my personal reasons for living in Chile have no direct connection with an impending (or not) Armageddon in the USA, I often reflect on how future socio/economic changes there might adversely affect the lives of my daughters, son-in-law, grandchildren, and close friends. I actively participate in USA civic affairs by continuing to vote in local, state and federal elections and by contributing financially to a number of social and charitable causes that I deem beneficial.
One must care about a world one will not see.
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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby California South » Tue Apr 10, 2012 4:26 pm

John, that's very "you". I would have expected no less. We may have dissimilar politics, but you. like many others here on this forum, walk your talk.
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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby john » Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:10 pm

California South wrote:John, that's very "you". I would have expected no less. We may have dissimilar politics, but you. like many others here on this forum, walk your talk.


Appreciate your kind sentiments!
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Re: Reasons to be an expat in Chile

Postby JHyre » Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:10 pm

From an email written by Vinzenzo Sciarretta to David Kotok:

For the downside from history we return to Vincenzo's email to me:

"Dear David,

"I invite you to read the last few sentences of the below article from The Lessons of History, by Will and Ariel Durant. It is about how the destruction of the Roman Empire through the taxation channel made people 'slaves,' in other words how serfdom emerged. This is my number one fear for Italy, but I guess France is making the same mistakes, just starting from a lower debt level. You can also find an online version of the book, thanks to Google.

"Rome had its socialist interlude under Diocletian. Faced with increasing poverty and restlessness among the masses, and with the imminent danger of barbarian invasion, he issued in A.D. 3 an edictum de pretiis, which denounced monopolists for keeping goods from the market to raise prices, and set maximum prices and wages for all important articles and services. Extensive public works were undertaken to put the unemployed to work, and food was distributed gratis, or at reduced prices, to the poor. The government – which already owned most mines, quarries, and salt deposits – brought nearly all major industries and guilds under detailed control. 'In every large town,' we are told, 'the state became a powerful employer, standing head and shoulders above the private industrialists, who were in any case crushed by taxation.' When businessmen predicted ruin, Diocletian explained that the barbarians were at the gate, and that individual liberty had to be shelved until collective liberty could be made secure. The socialism of Diocletian was a war economy, made possible by fear of foreign attack. Other factors equal, internal liberty varies inversely with external danger.

"The task of controlling men in economic detail proved too much for Diocletian's expanding, expensive, and corrupt bureaucracy. To support this officialdom – the army, the courts, public works, and the dole – taxation rose to such heights that people lost the incentive to work or earn, and an erosive contest began between lawyers finding devices to evade taxes and lawyers formulating laws to prevent evasion. Thousands of Romans, to escape the tax gatherer, fled over the frontiers to seek refuge among the barbarians. Seeking to check this elusive mobility and to facilitate regulation and taxation, the government issued decrees binding the peasant to his field and the worker to his shop until all their debts and taxes had been paid. In this and other ways medieval serfdom began."


Interesting that this little gem should appear in my inbox (from John Mauldin's newsletter) just after the discussion here. The more things change....

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