Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby El pescado » Sun Mar 25, 2012 9:00 am

Very good observation NCFYM! Thanks for bringing this to light as same idea hit me about 5 years ago. I had lost a substantial amount of money in the real estate bubble, could not find a job to save my life, and was just recently married to a Chilena. So what did I do? I moved to Chile. My parents were still in pretty good health and traveling like snowbirds do so I really was not that concerned about them. 5 years with parkinsons & diabetes can start to take a toll on am 80 year old man which is about the only main reason I am wanting to go back. That and education is cheaper and I really dont want my boys growing up with concrete walls, fences, security alarms blasting all hours of the day & night and bars on the door/windows

I am only wanting to be there to spend a few remaining years with him and then return to Chile and return the reins to the Chilena. If she wants to stand in line to pay the water bill, thats her decesion! :idea:

Thanks again NCFYM! it really gave me something to think about.
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby fahrvergnugen » Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:02 pm

El pescado wrote:Very good observation NCFYM! Thanks for bringing this to light as same idea hit me about 5 years ago. I had lost a substantial amount of money in the real estate bubble, could not find a job to save my life, and was just recently married to a Chilena. So what did I do? I moved to Chile. My parents were still in pretty good health and traveling like snowbirds do so I really was not that concerned about them. 5 years with parkinsons & diabetes can start to take a toll on am 80 year old man which is about the only main reason I am wanting to go back. That and education is cheaper and I really dont want my boys growing up with concrete walls, fences, security alarms blasting all hours of the day & night and bars on the door/windows

I am only wanting to be there to spend a few remaining years with him and then return to Chile and return the reins to the Chilena. If she wants to stand in line to pay the water bill, thats her decesion! :idea:

Thanks again NCFYM! it really gave me something to think about.



Question: WHY do you live in Santiago? Have you ever ventured further South? And if so why not try to make a life where you can actually breathe the air?
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby Gloria » Sun Mar 25, 2012 4:21 pm

no country for young men wrote: True the band is still playing and the lights are still on but the ship is doomed and up close it is going to be ugly by the lifeboats.

True words were never spoken so candidly. We felt the noise and tremors of the financial quake coming and we decided to get out of the way. Everyone thought we were nuts, that we didn't know what we were talking about but we refuse to listen and against all odds we left our families and memories behind. Almost 4 years later, we made our own little paradise.No regrets but lots of hard work.
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby peregrine77 » Mon Mar 26, 2012 4:38 pm

Life is a series of compromises. Having lived in possibly the most safe and beautiful part of So. Cal. for 43 years I must agree with fahrvergnugn. The changes I see
when I leave the scenic Oregon coast where we have called home for 18 yrs. to visit family are unimaginable. You can cut the ambient anger now present with a knife, if they will still allow you to own one there.
Another issue ignored by the main stream media, owned and contolled by a few old wealthy families, completely ignor the radiation from Fukushima that many of
us with high tec radiation monitors are measuring. Extreemly high counts in Seattle, Boise, Vermont, Toronto had readings of 2200 counts per minute!! Back ground radiation levels on the coast are 31 CPM, +/-. We have detected with two seperate divises on one rainy day
903 CPM!!! In about a year aprox. 25 million tons of flotsam the size of California will arrive on our beachs. Welcome home!
-
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby El pescado » Mon Mar 26, 2012 5:33 pm

fahrvergnugen wrote:
El pescado wrote:Very good observation NCFYM! Thanks for bringing this to light as same idea hit me about 5 years ago. I had lost a substantial amount of money in the real estate bubble, could not find a job to save my life, and was just recently married to a Chilena. So what did I do? I moved to Chile. My parents were still in pretty good health and traveling like snowbirds do so I really was not that concerned about them. 5 years with parkinsons & diabetes can start to take a toll on am 80 year old man which is about the only main reason I am wanting to go back. That and education is cheaper and I really dont want my boys growing up with concrete walls, fences, security alarms blasting all hours of the day & night and bars on the door/windows

I am only wanting to be there to spend a few remaining years with him and then return to Chile and return the reins to the Chilena. If she wants to stand in line to pay the water bill, thats her decesion! :idea:

Thanks again NCFYM! it really gave me something to think about.



Question: WHY do you live in Santiago? Have you ever ventured further South? And if so why not try to make a life where you can actually breathe the air?



I am here because I married a Chileana and she thought it would be best(with the help of my in-laws) to return to Chile after living a few years in Florida. Of course when I married her, she was still living with her parents and her parents did almost everything except pay the plane tickets for us to move down here.

I am not much of a city boy and i have been a far south is LA. I would love to move south when I move back but everyone asks me how will you live? Where will you work? How will you provide for your family? like the only way you can make it is if you live in Santiago.
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby admin » Mon Mar 26, 2012 5:39 pm

Once you go expat, you never can really go back.


You know that post did an excellent job of summing it up. You really do pass a point of no return. The most foreign country I have been to in my life was the United States in the last 10 to15 years.
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby murf » Mon Mar 26, 2012 9:34 pm

no country for young men wrote:Once you go expat, you never can really go back.

That is what I was told by a permanent ex-pat Brit around my fifth year in east Asia. In about the only time I had a serious conversation with this man, he pulled me in his office, shut the door and told me it was time for me to go home. From 40 years of watching expats, he thought that for most, once you are outside for more than five years, you can never really go home.

I ignored the advice and went home after 11 years. A mistake. I have never "fit in" again. Not with the friends who stayed behind, not really even with family who travel widely, are multilingual and do business outside the US regularly.

I don't know what is different, I do know many other expats who have had trouble reintegrating and whether the too late rule is five years or seven, I don't know either. (Might be a good question for others like Px and G&J who have never gone home.)

At least in my case, it wasn't that the foreign settings were "better" than what I had left or returned to - Asian countries have a number of shortcomings and where I live in the States is very attractive.

It's just a matter of not feeling at home anymore. I think you should consider this before assuming that you can just move home and life will go on as if you didn't leave.

---------------------------------

Here's a second thing to consider. I returned to the US on biz trips on average 3 times a year. In retrospect, the gaps were just long enough to discern changes which one might miss if living full time in the US - kind of like a jumpy old movie at 15 frames per second. Most of these changes I saw were not in a favorable direction, from the coarsening of the culture to manias for war and financial bubbles.

I don't think the locals were as aware of what was happening as regular visitors were - or maybe it was just the warm welcome by US customs at 6 AM after 30 hours of travel....

Now, I think the rate of change has accelerated to the point where one can see these changes without leaving town. We are in a Quickening; it feels like a non-linear change process and I fear an event horizon right around the bend. I feel like a Jew in Munich in 1937... I am still looking out and it kind of shocks me to read about people returning voluntarily. True the band is still playing and the lights are still on but the ship is doomed and up close it is going to be ugly by the lifeboats.

If the US goes down one of the many rabbit holes up ahead, will you regret having returned or pat yourself on the back for looking around Chile for an alternative first?

At least buy a RT ticket on that side before you go.. for insurance.


I left Ireland for the US in 1986 and returned in 1995. I stuck it for three months before bailing for London.
I found that in the US, I was a foreigner and when I returned to Ireland, a misfit or "Yank". In the last 12 years I've been there three times, for two weddings and a funeral. I'd like to leave the states and was in the process of making serious plans three years ago when fate stepped in (in the form of health issues).
I suppose that expats also find it difficult to settle in one place after the initial move.
"Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans"
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Re: Reasons to grok....

Postby greg~judy » Mon Mar 26, 2012 10:40 pm

murf wrote:
no country for young men wrote:Once you go expat, you never can really go back.

That is what I was told by a permanent ex-pat Brit around my fifth year in east Asia. In about the only time I had a serious conversation with this man, he pulled me in his office, shut the door and told me it was time for me to go home. From 40 years of watching expats, he thought that for most, once you are outside for more than five years, you can never really go home.

I ignored the advice and went home after 11 years. A mistake. I have never "fit in" again. Not with the friends who stayed behind, not really even with family who travel widely, are multilingual and do business outside the US regularly.

I don't know what is different, I do know many other expats who have had trouble reintegrating and whether the too late rule is five years or seven, I don't know either. (Might be a good question for others like Px and G&J who have never gone home.)

At least in my case, it wasn't that the foreign settings were "better" than what I had left or returned to - Asian countries have a number of shortcomings and where I live in the States is very attractive.

It's just a matter of not feeling at home anymore. I think you should consider this before assuming that you can just move home and life will go on as if you didn't leave.

ok, that IS a good question for g~j...
a simple, succinct, concise reply = no, we can't go back.
not sure at what point (how many years "away") such a realization (epiphany?) occurred?

have you ever read "stranger in a strange land"
(btw - you should)
once you do, you can grok the concept of "can't go back"...

no place is w/o flaws, everywhere there will be compromises...
it's when we/you can only realize the huge "costs" of "going back"
(not only the tangibles, but those so, so many intangibles...)
it will appear far less desirable to ever go "home" again - so, why bother?
one just needs to grok this - no worries (ever) about "home"...!
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby fahrvergnugen » Tue Mar 27, 2012 3:53 am

peregrine77 wrote:Life is a series of compromises. Having lived in possibly the most safe and beautiful part of So. Cal. for 43 years I must agree with fahrvergnugn. The changes I see
when I leave the scenic Oregon coast where we have called home for 18 yrs. to visit family are unimaginable. You can cut the ambient anger now present with a knife, if they will still allow you to own one there.
Another issue ignored by the main stream media, owned and contolled by a few old wealthy families, completely ignor the radiation from Fukushima that many of
us with high tec radiation monitors are measuring. Extreemly high counts in Seattle, Boise, Vermont, Toronto had readings of 2200 counts per minute!! Back ground radiation levels on the coast are 31 CPM, +/-. We have detected with two seperate divises on one rainy day
903 CPM!!! In about a year aprox. 25 million tons of flotsam the size of California will arrive on our beachs. Welcome home!
-


Do you have any radiation data from SoCal? This is freaking me out...
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby California South » Tue Mar 27, 2012 12:03 pm

fahrvergnugen, I stumbled on this right after the Fukushima disaster (lived in SoCal at that time).
This guy is in Santa Monica, and has had disturbing readings - explore his site a bit.
http://www.enviroreporter.com/2011/03/e ... n-station/
Also, may I heartily recommend this forum, sponsored by U of C Berkeley/Dept of Nuclear Engineering:
http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/forum/218
You will find very passionate sentiments here (including one very obnoxious shill), both pro and con nuke power, and good debate on both sides. Check out the postings of "BC". He doesn't seem to have an agenda and has contributed great information.
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby no country for young men » Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:18 pm

peregrine77 wrote: Extreemly high counts in Seattle, Boise, Vermont, Toronto had readings of 2200 counts per minute!! Back ground radiation levels on the coast are 31 CPM, +/-. We have detected with two seperate divises on one rainy day
903 CPM!!! In about a year aprox. 25 million tons of flotsam the size of California will arrive on our beachs. Welcome home!
-


Here's my wife's blog covering Fukushima.

http://ex-skf.blogspot.com/

She has two recent posts on Fukushima radiation pollution on the west coast. (I just posted links to articles on another allchile.net thread, on the seaweed biz.)

It appears that the worst hit areas on the west coast were central and southern California during an unusually strong rainstorm in March 2011.

(I don't think CPS readings jumping during rain or snow events are necessarily indicative of Fukushima pollution by the way.)
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Re: Reasons to move back to the U.S.

Postby no country for young men » Sat Mar 31, 2012 6:31 pm

fahrvergnugen wrote:
Do you have any radiation data from SoCal? This is freaking me out...


Wouldn't freak out over CPS (counts per minute) readings... when other measurements are available with more information for consideration of health issues.

Ya wanna get freaked out? Read my wife's blog on Fukushima: http://ex-skf.blogspot.com. Be glad you don't live the land of the setting sun - or should it be sat sun.

See my recent post under seaweed biz on allchile.net for recent studies on SoCal radiation levels from Fukushima.

Px in previous post lists two sites where Fukushima pollution impacts were measured. I will comment on those in a reply to his post.
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