What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby RG1981 » Fri Jul 08, 2011 9:19 am

It seems to mean something different everywhere in the world...I was considering studying at the U of Chile, but I'm not sure how the "licentiate" degree they offer will translate back home. In the US the term is described as...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Licentiate#United_States

But I wanted to study English literature and composition and not law, which results in a "licentiate". How would I put this on my resume in terms that an American company would understand?
RG1981
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 5:52 pm
Location: Recoleta, Santiago

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby seawolf180 » Fri Jul 08, 2011 4:50 pm

Im wondering if a student with a high school diploma (and SAT scores) can use that to get into universities in Chile.
Outside in Chile
seawolf180
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 576
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:49 pm
Location: Pichilemu

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby rocksana » Mon Jul 11, 2011 3:42 pm

I think it is equivalent to a Master's degree, although after Licenciatura normally Master degrees are offered (used to be a bit redundant).
Universidad Catolica was trying to start a Bachelor's program, so they removed some of the core courses, but I lost track with what was going on these last 5 years.

In your resume you would write 'equivalent to xxx degree in the U.S.A.'
User avatar
rocksana
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: Imatra, Finland /Ås, Norway/ Santiago, Chile

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby Riyko » Wed Jul 13, 2011 1:53 pm

seawolf180 wrote:Im wondering if a student with a high school diploma (and SAT scores) can use that to get into universities in Chile.


If you can, you'd most likely need ACT scores and not SAT scores (most universities are starting to fade out the SAT scores, i know because all of the uni's i've applied to in the States say ACT only :evil:)
"por la muestra se conoce el paño"
User avatar
Riyko
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 96
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2008 11:27 pm
Location: Somewhere on a Jet!

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby RG1981 » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:18 pm

Thanks for the info guys...did anybody here study at U Chile? Any feedback or advice? Will it be hard for me to get in because I'm foreign or will they take into account that I've already been here for 3 years and go easy on me?
RG1981
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Tue May 31, 2011 5:52 pm
Location: Recoleta, Santiago

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby comegalletas » Thu Jul 14, 2011 12:10 am

RG1981 wrote:Thanks for the info guys...did anybody here study at U Chile? Any feedback or advice? Will it be hard for me to get in because I'm foreign or will they take into account that I've already been here for 3 years and go easy on me?


I´m a chilean undergrad business student (which is known here as Ingeniería Comercial).
Go check the english websites of the universities, they normally have a different way to get in for foreigners, which sometimes doesn´t involve doing the PSU test, including many of the good ones, public or private. Some of them may accept you right away, just be careful about the quality of where are you going.

What field of study do you wanna follow?
comegalletas
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:13 pm

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby seawolf180 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 3:26 pm

comegalletas wrote:
RG1981 wrote:Thanks for the info guys...did anybody here study at U Chile? Any feedback or advice? Will it be hard for me to get in because I'm foreign or will they take into account that I've already been here for 3 years and go easy on me?


I´m a chilean undergrad business student (which is known here as Ingeniería Comercial).
Go check the english websites of the universities, they normally have a different way to get in for foreigners, which sometimes doesn´t involve doing the PSU test, including many of the good ones, public or private. Some of them may accept you right away, just be careful about the quality of where are you going.

What field of study do you wanna follow?


Hope you don't mind me butting in on your thread, but this could be helpful to families in general too.
My situation;
My daughter has lived both here and in the US. She is in 11th grade (Tercer Media) in both countries. She will finish in the US hopefully in the next year, but her heart is in Chile and she wants to come back and study here first. She is totally belingual, and wants to take advantage of that to study a carrer in interpreting, or something related. I'm not sure what the best school would be for her to apply to, if one stands out in that area. Any thoughts on that?..anybody.
Also, I hope you are right that a high school diploma from her high school in the US, and test scores will be enough to get her in. I don't want her to get hung up finishing her also.
Before I start contacting admissions at different schools I'd like to have a clue.
Outside in Chile
seawolf180
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 576
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:49 pm
Location: Pichilemu

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby comegalletas » Thu Jul 14, 2011 4:17 pm

seawolf180 wrote:Hope you don't mind me butting in on your thread, but this could be helpful to families in general too.
My situation;
My daughter has lived both here and in the US. She is in 11th grade (Tercer Media) in both countries. She will finish in the US hopefully in the next year, but her heart is in Chile and she wants to come back and study here first. She is totally belingual, and wants to take advantage of that to study a carrer in interpreting, or something related. I'm not sure what the best school would be for her to apply to, if one stands out in that area. Any thoughts on that?..anybody.
Also, I hope you are right that a high school diploma from her high school in the US, and test scores will be enough to get her in. I don't want her to get hung up finishing her also.
Before I start contacting admissions at different schools I'd like to have a clue.


As an example, check the special admission system for UdeC (public U). They do have something for people that did high school elsewhere.
http://admision.udec.cl/?q=node/10#2
http://admision.udec.cl/?q=node/82

Same for UTFSM: http://www.utfsm.cl/admision/admision_e ... extranjero

This is a PDF for UAndes, a private one: http://www.uandes.cl/comunicaciones/adm ... anjero.pdf
comegalletas
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:13 pm

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby nwdiver » Thu Jul 14, 2011 4:45 pm

Here are is the info in English for Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

http://www.uc.cl/english/prospectus/
It's all about the wine.
http://chilecopadevino.com/
User avatar
nwdiver
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:45 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC and Chile where ever it's Summer

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby seawolf180 » Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:32 pm

Thanks for the leads
Outside in Chile
seawolf180
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 576
Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 6:49 pm
Location: Pichilemu

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby rocksana » Fri Jul 15, 2011 8:50 am

patagoniax wrote: Licenciado is usually a bachelor's degree equivalent in Chile. Magister is the Chilean term for equivalent to a North American Masters.

The following wikipedia item is not bulletproof but potentially useful



Yes, agreed. But I meant something more in the sense of 'homology vs analogy'.

A LIcenciatura degree does not include a major and a minor, but only one subject, so when comparing a Licenciatura and a BAchelor's degree, you end up with way more credit hours for the major subject.
I don't know how it is for social sciences but for natural sciences normally we can apply directly to a PhD program after Licenciatura. All the cases I know, including my own, were the same. We translated Licenciatura as Bachelors and then we had to take the qualifier exam earlier than usual because we had already taken the graduate level courses during the LIcenciatura, so in the end the Licenciatura degree was taken as a Masters degree (cases in USA, Canada, Germany and France).

I found LIcenciatura more similar to a German Diploma than Bachelors.
But on the other hand Chilean Universities do offer Master degrees, so it is a kind of weird system and I remember at Catolica they were trying to make it more similar to a Bachelor's by removing some core courses and (maybe?) adding other less relevant courses from other areas. But I have no idea whether they did it or not, it was in the plans a few years ago, then I lost track.

I kind of like the idea of having the chance of studying different subjects that count toward your degree (major and minor), with the Licenciatura, you are allowed to take other courses from other careers but they do not count as credit hours.
On the other hand, you end up with a pretty solid base with the Licenciatura, so both systems have positive sides.

The good thing that the chilean system has (or used to have?) is that you pay a fixed amount for the career you are studying, and not per credit hour, so if your GPA is good you can have permission to take more credit hours and enroll in courses from other careers, even though they will not count as valid credit hours. Also there used to be a way to study two careers at the same time, and you only pay the most expensive one.
User avatar
rocksana
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Sat Jul 17, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: Imatra, Finland /Ås, Norway/ Santiago, Chile

Re: What is a "licenciate" degree?

Postby comegalletas » Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:10 pm

rocksana wrote:I don't know how it is for social sciences but for natural sciences normally we can apply directly to a PhD program after Licenciatura. All the cases I know, including my own, were the same. We translated Licenciatura as Bachelors and then we had to take the qualifier exam earlier than usual because we had already taken the graduate level courses during the LIcenciatura, so in the end the Licenciatura degree was taken as a Masters degree (cases in USA, Canada, Germany and France).

I found LIcenciatura more similar to a German Diploma than Bachelors.


Interesting. I'm about to get my Licenciatura next year, but the university doesn't give you much attention in terms of homologation and stuff except when you prepare for the Título with the thesis. What could I do? I´d like to get this on the fast track, I don´t like the fact that careers in Chile are so long.
comegalletas
Rank: Chile Forum Citizen
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:13 pm

Next

Return to Jobs in Chile and Work Related Issues in Chile

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users